International Arbitration

  • November 23, 2022

    Investors Left Hanging As Europe Balks At Modernizing ECT

    The fate of the Energy Charter Treaty remained in limbo last week after European Union member states were unable to agree on whether to modernize the controversial trade pact, leaving the bloc in an awkward position as it looks to woo the investors expected to finance its climate ambitions.

  • November 23, 2022

    Energy Investors Indicted In Luxembourg Over $506M Award

    Two Moldovan oil and gas investors who won a $506 million arbitral award against Kazakhstan nearly a decade ago have been indicted in Luxembourg in connection with their attempts to enforce the allegedly fraudulent award, according to documents filed in Texas federal court.

  • November 23, 2022

    Infrastructure Co. Says Mogul Can't Escape $40M Award

    A Brazilian company has asked a New York federal judge to enforce a $40.7 million arbitral award against a Brazilian business mogul it accuses of hiding assets offshore, pushing back on the mogul's argument that the court lacks jurisdiction.

  • November 23, 2022

    Milbank Adds Int'l Arbitration Atty From King & Spalding

    Milbank LLP said it has hired a former King & Spalding LLP partner with an array of experience in high-profile international arbitrations.

  • November 23, 2022

    Seafood Importer Fears Fish Will Go Bad, Seeks Faster Ruling

    A Texas fish importer asked the U.S. Court of International Trade to expedite its case that the U.S. illegally blocked its shipment, arguing it will suffer economic harm from its fish going bad and being excluded from the U.S. market.

  • November 23, 2022

    Judge Transfers £270M Microsoft Antitrust Suit To CAT

    The U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal will take the reins of a £270 million ($325 million) antitrust lawsuit which accuses Microsoft Corp. of stifling the resale market for its software licenses, a High Court judge has ordered.

  • November 23, 2022

    Mishcon Lands Arbitration Pro From Eversheds Sutherland

    Mishcon de Reya LLP has continued to build its international arbitration team with the hire of a specialist in construction, energy and transport disputes from Eversheds Sutherland.

  • November 22, 2022

    Turkey-Owned Bank Immune From Prosecution, Justices Told

    Turkey says the state-owned lender Halkbank cannot face federal charges over allegations that it helped Iran evade U.S. sanctions, telling the U.S. Supreme Court that the case against the financial institution is a "demeaning move" for eschewing the principle of state immunity from prosecution.

  • November 22, 2022

    US Says Ukrainian Money Laundering Suit Should Proceed

    The U.S. government urged a Florida court on Monday to uphold a magistrate judge's findings that a money laundering lawsuit involving a pair of Ukrainian bankers and a Kentucky office building is not time-barred.

  • November 22, 2022

    ECJ Rules Money-Laundering Law Infringes Right To Privacy

    Europe's highest court ruled Tuesday that amendments to a European Union directive that requires member states to make information on the beneficial owners of corporate entities accessible to the public interfere with the right to privacy.

  • November 22, 2022

    Reed Smith Adds Dechert Cross-Border Litigator In LA

    Reed Smith LLP is expanding its global disputes team by adding a Dechert LLP cross-border litigator as a partner in its Los Angeles office.

  • November 22, 2022

    Insurers Likely To Take Hit From Ships Trapped In Ukraine

    Marine insurers could start being confronted with claims early next year over vessels valued at up to $1 billion that are trapped in Ukrainian ports, a division of Allianz warned Tuesday.

  • November 21, 2022

    Modernized ECT In Jeopardy As EU Member States Jump Ship

    The European Commission has asked to postpone a vote on the modernization of the Energy Charter Treaty after European Union member states said Friday they were unable reach a majority in favor of reforming the controversial trade pact.

  • November 21, 2022

    Saudi Heirs' Atty Rips Special Master In Falsified Article Spat

    A Seattle attorney representing Saudi heirs in a fight with Chevron over an $18 billion arbitral award has lodged objections to a special master report calling for sanctions over an article he had fabricated, arguing that the recommendation "recklessly disregards any and all statutes, case law or procedural rules" that exculpate him.

  • November 21, 2022

    Ex-Dentons Atty Can't Get Redo Of Order Requiring Arbitration

    A California appeals court on Friday summarily denied a rehearing request after ordering a former Dentons LLP partner to arbitrate claims he was unjustly fired over a disputed $34 million contingency fee in New York.

  • November 21, 2022

    Seized Cash Rise Linked To 'Controversial' Orders, RPC Says

    The amount of money seized in forfeiture orders by U.K. enforcement agencies has nearly doubled in the last year, according to data published Monday by law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain, who said a "controversial" enforcement strategy allows authorities to easily seize the funds.

  • November 21, 2022

    Hotelier Sues Former Qatari PM Over €51M Loan Repayments

    A hotelier has sued former Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani over a €51 million ($52.3 million) loan tied to an options agreement for shares in several luxury hotels including The Berkeley and Claridge's.

  • November 18, 2022

    Coinbase Clients Rip 'Patently Unfair' Arbitration Agreement

    A pair of Coinbase customers say the cryptocurrency exchange cannot force them to arbitrate a lawsuit over allegedly misleading marketing tactics, arguing that the company's arbitration agreement is "rife with" provisions that disadvantage clients and protect its financial interests.

  • November 18, 2022

    Angolan Co. Asks Justices To Keep $1.1B Contract Suit In US

    An Angolan energy company challenging the loss of $1.1 billion in government contracts pushed the U.S. Supreme Court to have its case litigated stateside, saying U.S. courts have jurisdiction over General Electric, which is accused of forging documents to taint the company's reputation.

  • November 18, 2022

    Lloyd's Says Property Owner Must Arbitrate Over Ida Damage

    Insurance company Lloyd's underwriters say a property owner can't file a suit against the company following unpaid damages from Hurricane Ida because it did not follow the proper procedures to file a claim and now must go through arbitration.

  • November 18, 2022

    Ukraine Reparations Planners Call On Int'l Arb. Attys For Help

    The architects of a yet-to-be-formed international mechanism to administer Ukrainian reparations claims against Russia issued a call on Friday for international arbitration practitioners to consider what they can do to help the effort, as they participated on a panel during a conference at Fordham University.

  • November 18, 2022

    EU Eyes Tight Rules On Using Enviro Terms For Fund Names

    The European Union's securities watchdog proposed on Friday that funds with climate-friendly and socially responsible names avoid misleading consumers over the nature of their investments in a bid to crack down on "greenwashing."

  • November 17, 2022

    Guatemala Says Israeli Co. Can't Escape $1.8M Award

    The Republic of Guatemala has reaffirmed its bid for a default ruling in a New York federal court case seeking to enforce a $1.8 million arbitration award against a no-show Israeli energy company, asserting it has properly served IC Power Asia Development Ltd. with the suit.

  • November 17, 2022

    Libya Defends Inconvenient-Forum Defense In Award Fight

    Libya has urged the Second Circuit not to revisit its precedent holding that courts can dismiss litigation to enforce a foreign arbitral award if a more convenient forum is available, as it fights to reverse a lower-court order enforcing a $20.7 million arbitral award against it.

  • November 17, 2022

    Nigerian Energy Co. Loses Award Challenge In $2B Loan Fight

    An English court has tossed a challenge by Nigerian energy conglomerate Aiteo against an arbitral award asserting a tribunal's jurisdiction over a claim brought by lenders against the company in their dispute seeking money owed under a $2 billion loan.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funders Seek Transparency In Disclosure Debate

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    Litigation funders want to correct the record on calls for funding disclosure in the name of transparency, as this purported justification obscures the disclosure's adverse effects — prejudicing plaintiffs' cases and discouraging the assertion of meritorious legal claims, say Dai Wai Chin Feman and William Weisman at Parabellum Capital.

  • 5 Principles For Better Professional Development Programs

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    The pandemic and ensuing "great resignation" have resulted in a more transient legal work force, but law firms can use effective professional development programs to bridge a cultural gap with new associates and stem associate attrition, says Matthew Woods at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Practice With Passion

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    First Circuit Judge Gustavo Gelpí recalls how Suffolk University Law School's Joseph Glannon taught the importance of the law as both a tool and a profession, and that those who wish to practice law successfully must do so with love, enthusiasm and passion.

  • Questions To Ask Before Making A Lateral Move As Partner

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    Law firm partners considering lateral moves should diligently interview prospects — going beyond standard questions about compensation to inquire about culture, associate retention and other areas that can provide a more comprehensive view, says Lauren Wu at VOYLegal.

  • New Indictments Reflect DOJ's All-Tools Approach To China

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recently announced charges against 13 individuals allegedly working on behalf of the Chinese government reflect a refinement of law enforcement’s role in countering national security threats, and an aggressive effort to disrupt China's long-standing practice of conducting intelligence operations on U.S. soil, says David Aaron at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Argue Open-Mindedly

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    Queens College President Frank Wu reflects on how Yale Kamisar’s teaching and guidance at the University of Michigan Law School emphasized a capacity to engage with alternative worldviews and the importance of the ability to argue for both sides of a debate.

  • ABA's No-Contact Rule Advice Raises Questions For Lawyers

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    The American Bar Association's ethics committee recently issued two opinions concerning the no-contact rule — one creates an intuitive and practical default for electronic communications, while the other sets a potential trap for pro se lawyers, say Lauren Snyder and Deepika Ravi at HWG.

  • 4 Key Skills For An Effective Attorney Coaching Conversation

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    As BigLaw firms are increasingly offering internal coaching as one of many talent strategies to stem ongoing lawyer attrition, Stacey Schwartz at Katten discusses how coaches can help attorneys achieve their goals.

  • Perspectives

    How Civilian Attorneys Can Help Veterans

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    With legal aid topping the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' annual list of unmet needs of veterans facing housing insecurity, nonmilitary volunteer attorneys can provide some of the most effective legal services to military and veteran clients, say Anna Richardson at Veterans Legal Services and Nicholas Hasenfus at Holland & Knight.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned That Culture Shapes Law

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    U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff of the Southern District of New York considers how a class with Jerry Cohen at Harvard Law helped him understand culture and history’s influence on jurisprudence, and how even seemingly settled law can evolve — all while espousing a more humanistic approach to teaching that restored Judge Rakoff's pride in being a lawyer.

  • Foreign Discovery Tips After Justices Tapered Statute's Scope

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    While U.S.-style discovery in foreign arbitration remains foreclosed in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ZF Automotive v. Luxshare decision, proceedings involving foreign governments may still qualify in international tribunals, and firms with U.S. interests should be wary of agreeing to provisions that could expose them to one-sided U.S. discovery, say Joseph Myles and Lionel Lavenue at Finnegan.

  • UAE's UK Reciprocity Order Is Good Start, Not Rubber Stamp

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    While a recent United Arab Emirates directive instructing Dubai courts to accept certain English court judgments is a step toward UAE-U.K. enforcement reciprocity, foreign orders and awards must still satisfy additional criteria in UAE onshore courts before being eligible for enforcement, say Rebecca Kelly and David Waldron at Morgan Lewis.

  • 9 Legal Ethics Considerations In Natural Disaster Preparation

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    Since natural disasters like Hurricane Ian do not relieve lawyers of their ethical obligations to clients, law firms should focus their preparedness efforts on specific areas crucial to continuity of representation and ethics compliance, like business and communications contingency planning, record redundancy and more, says Mark Hinderks at Stinson.

  • Series

    My Favorite Law Prof: How I Learned To Put Law Into Practice

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    Massachusetts U.S. Attorney Rachael Rollins looks back at how Judge Charles Spurlock's trial advocacy class at Northeastern University School of Law challenged her to apply what she had already learned about civil and criminal procedure, evidence and criminal law to solving real-world problems.

  • UK Arbitration Review Makes Sensible Case For Status Quo

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    The U.K. Law Commission's recent consultation paper recommends only minor updates to key areas of the Arbitration Act 1996, showing the commission's clear preference to hold to the established standards under which London became one of the most popular seats of international arbitration, say Ruth Byrne and Elysia-Elena Stellakis at King & Spalding.

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