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International Trade

  • May 25, 2018

    Trump Strikes Deal With ZTE, Roiling Capitol Hill

    President Donald Trump announced late Friday that he has struck an agreement with Chinese telecom giant ZTE Corp. to restore its access to the U.S. market, openly defying lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who had urged the White House to take a hard line on the company following its illicit sales to Iran and North Korea.

  • May 25, 2018

    US-Canada Wine Row: Contentious Notes, Uncertain Finish 

    The Trump administration on Friday asked for a World Trade Organization panel to examine its complaint against Canadian wine rules that have allegedly kept U.S. wine off grocery store shelves in British Columbia, moving the dispute to a more contentious phase after talks to settle the fight fell through.

  • May 25, 2018

    Iran Nuclear Deal Withdrawal Will Prompt Private Disputes

    While it’s unlikely that the U.S. would lose an investor-state claim initiated as a result of its withdrawal from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, the headaches for non-U.S. companies that began doing business in Iran after the deal was implemented could be just beginning, experts say.

  • May 25, 2018

    CIT Says Commerce Dept. Can Use Thai Data In Solar Probe

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Friday sustained the U.S. Department of Commerce's use of Thai data to determine the value of scrapped solar modules in a dispute stemming from the anti-dumping investigation of certain crystalline silicon photovoltaic products from China.

  • May 25, 2018

    Auto Industry Is Lukewarm On Trump's New Trade Probe

    The nation's leading automakers gave a tepid response to President Donald Trump's decision to probe the national security risks of imported cars, underscoring the highly contentious nature of the administration's latest trade enforcement salvo.

  • May 25, 2018

    CIT Hands US Default Judgment Against Clothing Importer

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has awarded the federal government more than $80,000 in a default win against a New York-based importer for lying about the country of origin for its imports of women's apparel from China.

  • May 24, 2018

    Car Wars: Trump's Latest Flex Will Test Bounds Of Trade Law

    President Donald Trump’s newly launched probe of national security threats posed by car imports has sent shockwaves through the trade bar and teed up a clash over the scope of an already controversial Cold War-era law that has emerged as a linchpin for the administration's trade enforcement regime.

  • May 24, 2018

    Iranian Banker Scores Bail In $115M Sanctions-Dodging Fight

    A Manhattan federal judge on Thursday agreed to the pretrial release of the Iranian chairman of a Maltese bank as he faces charges of evading U.S. sanctions on Iran by funneling $115 million in Venezuelan construction funds through American banks, following a protracted fight over a $34 million bail package.

  • May 24, 2018

    Chinese Co.'s Suit Over GSK Probe Tied To US, 3rd Circ. Told

    A pair of consultants who alleged that they landed in a Chinese prison after GlaxoSmithKline LLC duped them into investigating an innocent whistleblower told the Third Circuit on Thursday that they meet the “domestic injury” requirement for filing a federal racketeering claim because their business is closely tied to the United States even though it is located in China.

  • May 24, 2018

    Chinese Auto Parts Co. Challenges Anti-Dumping Rate

    A U.S. subsidiary of Chinese auto parts giant Wanxiang Group Corp. has challenged a U.S. Department of Commerce ruling saying that heavy tariffs applied to its wheel hub assemblies, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade that it should have been assigned the same zero rate as its parent company.

  • May 24, 2018

    Beijing Blasts Canada For Blocking Sale Of Construction Co.

    China's foreign ministry pushed back Thursday against Canada's decision to block a Chinese buyer's CA$1.51 billion ($1.16 billion) takeover of construction company Aecon Group Inc., suggesting that the move was motivated by politics and not national security concerns and calling for a fair playing field for foreign investors.

  • May 24, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Partly Reverses CIT Ruling On Door Handle Duties

    The U.S. Department of Commerce must reconsider whether certain aluminum kitchen appliance door handles imported from China by Whirlpool Corp. are shipped as “finished merchandise” and therefore elude tariffs on aluminum extrusions, a split Federal Circuit panel determined on Wednesday.

  • May 23, 2018

    WTO Boss Sees Sector-Specific Trade Talks Picking Up Steam

    World Trade Organization director-general Roberto Azevedo said Monday that he has seen "real momentum" in the WTO's efforts to craft new rules on e-commerce and commercial fishing following its pivot from large-scale trade talks to sector-specific consultations.

  • May 23, 2018

    BigLaw Feels The Heat In FARA Enforcement Push

    Behind the scenes, law firms are scrambling to stay in the government’s good graces after the Foreign Agents Registration Act was used to indict President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman.

  • May 23, 2018

    As Foreign Agent Disclosure Soars, Reform Efforts Bog Down

    With the Foreign Agents Registration Act in the spotlight, some members of Congress are facing big challenges in their quest to add teeth to the law.

  • May 23, 2018

    Foreign Lobbyists Step Into Light After Manafort Downfall

    “Ridiculous” is how Paul Manafort's attorney has described his client's charges under a loosely followed foreign lobbying law, but a Law360 analysis shows that throngs of Washington influencers are now emerging from the shadows to comply.

  • May 23, 2018

    Trump Eying New Security-Based Tariffs On Imported Cars

    At the direction of President Donald Trump, the U.S. Department of Commerce late Wednesday launched an investigation that may result in new duties on imported cars using the same national security statute that cleared the way for the administration’s steel and aluminum levies earlier this year.

  • May 23, 2018

    Akin Gump Partner To Testify At Manafort Trial

    Attorneys for Special Counsel Robert Mueller confirmed Wednesday in D.C. district court that they intend to call Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP partner Melissa L. Laurenza to testify at the trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

  • May 23, 2018

    What Attys Need To Know About The Evolving CFIUS Bill

    Lawmakers are busy adjusting proposed legislation that aims to modernize the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, editing language that covers issues like intellectual property transfers, judicial reviews and proximity in real estate transactions. Here, Law360 reviews what lawyers need to know about how the potential changes could alter the CFIUS process.

  • May 23, 2018

    Atty's FCA Suit Over Alleged Chinese Steel Pipe Scam Tossed

    An Illinois federal judge threw out a False Claims Act lawsuit against a company that imports steel pipe from China after finding Wednesday that the relator’s claims were already part of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection administrative penalty proceeding.

Expert Analysis

  • The Many Challenges Facing Venezuela Bribery Suit: Part 2

    Richard Cooper

    Resolution of the standing issues raised in the U.S. bribery suit brought by Venezuela’s state-owned oil company PDVSA may have implications not just for this case, but for whether PDVSA may be bound by the Venezuelan government to any future debt restructuring, say Richard Cooper and Boaz Morag of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • The Many Challenges Facing Venezuela Bribery Suit: Part 1

    Richard Cooper

    The documents filed thus far in the U.S. bribery suit brought by Venezuela’s state-owned oil company PDVSA make clear that the standing issues in this case are complicated. The case also presents questions as to whether it will have implications for financial creditors of PDVSA and the republic, say Richard Cooper and Boaz Morag of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP.

  • Opinion

    There Is Middle Ground For US Lawyers On AML Regimes

    Matthew O'Hara

    The American Bar Association continues to oppose legislation that would impose certain European Union and U.K. anti-money laundering requirements on U.S. lawyers. The ABA should further consider its approach to this issue as there is a viable middle ground that protects privileged communications and confidential information while advancing the interests of the legal profession, says Matthew O’Hara of Freeborn & Peters LLP.

  • Trump Tariffs May Violate Investment Treaty Protections

    Javier Rubinstein

    Foreign companies affected by the America First tariffs should consider the extent to which such tariffs may violate their rights under applicable investment treaties or free trade agreements, and thus may provide them with recourse in international arbitration for the harm they have suffered, say Javier Rubinstein and Lauren Friedman of Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • What Cos. Need To Know About China’s New Market Regulator

    Katherine Wang

    As part of a sweeping government restructuring plan announced last month, China is merging a range of government agencies into the new State Market Regulatory Administration. Multinational companies doing business in China must pay close attention to how functions within the newly consolidated agency will be organized, say attorneys with Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Finance-Savvy Millennials Are Shifting Business Of Law

    Michael Perlich

    The impact of millennials has already been felt within the legal community by our eagerness to embrace new technologies. One way that we will have potentially even more impact lies in our willingness to embrace new ways of developing business and financing law, says Michael Perich of Burford Capital LLC.

  • Opinion

    Attorney-Client Privilege Is Alive And Well

    Genie Harrison

    The FBI raid of the office of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer set off a firestorm of controversy about the sanctity of the attorney-client privilege, epitomized by Trump's tweet that the "privilege is dead." But attorney-client privilege is never taken lightly — I have battle scars from the times I have sought crime-fraud exceptions, says Genie Harrison of the Genie Harrison Law Firm.

  • Roundup

    Dissolving Practice

    Dissolving Practice

    In this series, experts discuss the unique aspects of closing a law firm, and some common symptoms of dysfunctionality in a firm that can be repaired before it's too late.

  • Series

    Dissolving Practice: How To Fix A Dysfunctional Law Firm

    Larry Richard

    I am often asked, “When there are one or more partner departures, what can a firm do to prevent this from escalating to a catastrophic level?” The short answer is “nothing.” Law firms need to adopt culture-strengthening lifestyles to prevent defections from occurring in the first place, says Larry Richard of LawyerBrain LLC.

  • New Russian Oligarch Sanctions Will Require Prompt Action

    Grant Leach

    Last week, the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control added several Russian oligarchs, political officials and businesses under their control to its Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List. These sanctions will likely impose serious compliance challenges for both U.S. and non-U.S. persons doing business with Russia, say attorneys with Husch Blackwell LLP.