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International Trade

  • November 12, 2009

    Importer Sues US Over Duties On Thai Vegetables

    A vegetable importer has filed suit against the United States in the U.S. Court of International Trade, challenging the government's 11.2 percent ad valorem duty rate on vegetable imports from Thailand.

  • November 12, 2009

    Lincoln Pushes ITC To Nullify Sidergas Motions

    Lincoln Electric Co. is urging the U.S. International Trade Commission to declare as moot various summary judgment motions filed by respondent Sidergas SpA of Italy in a patent case over welding wire equipment.

  • November 12, 2009

    Q&A With Becker & Poliakoff's Peter Quinter

    The concepts of "border security," "homeland security," and "food safety and security" in the United States have created a growing demand for legal experts in international trade, and compliance with the alphabet soup of federal agencies will continue to be acute and likely intensify, says Peter A. Quinter, chair of Becker & Poliakoff PA's customs and international trade group.

  • November 12, 2009

    Trade, WTO Membership Top EU-Russia Summit Agenda

    Trade barriers for European companies and Russia's desire to join the World Trade Organization must be focal points of discussion at a European Union-Russia summit set for next week, a Swedish official has said.

  • November 12, 2009

    ArcelorMittal Resolute In Opposition To Steel Duties

    Steel giant ArcelorMittal Group is pushing ahead with its bid for summary determination in a case challenging anti-dumping and countervailing duties leveled against the company's Belgium-based subsidiary.

  • November 11, 2009

    Q&A With Arnall Golden's Philip Skinner

    Many foreign investors are eager to take advantage of what they quite correctly view as a very depressed commercial real estate market in the U.S. at present. The problems that they face are both legal and business in nature, says Philip G. Skinner, chair of Arnall Golden Gregory LLP's leasing practice group.

  • November 11, 2009

    Ford Fires Back At US In Drawback Claims Feud

    Ford Motor Co. has fired back at the U.S. government in a spat in the U.S. Court of International Trade over drawback claims the auto company insists have already liquidated, rejecting as “flawed” and “misconstrued” the government's stance that the court should dismiss the case because Ford did not exhaust administrative remedies before filing suit.

  • November 11, 2009

    CPSIA Compliance Challenges Importers, Regulators

    Imported goods pose a particular challenge under the stringent federal product liability laws enacted last year, and importers now face new levels of liability in terms of ensuring product safety. Law360 spoke to experts about ways for regulators and importers to avoid obstacles posed by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, and the unique difficulties presented by China.

  • November 11, 2009

    EU, Iraq Set To Ink First Contractual Agreement

    The European Commission expects to reach a final agreement with Iraq to improve trade relations and investment opportunities between the two when negotiators meet in Brussels on Thursday to hammer out the details of the political arrangement, the regulator said Wednesday.

  • November 11, 2009

    ITC To Keep Duties On Wire Strand From 6 Countries

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has voted to maintain countervailing and anti-dumping duty orders on prestressed concrete steel wire strand from a host of nations, finding that domestic manufacturers could be injured if the duties were eliminated.

  • November 11, 2009

    Pa. Legislators Support US Ribbon Maker In ITC

    A U.S. senator and representative from Pennsylvania have thrown their support behind their constituent Berwick Offray LLC, a ribbon maker that initiated a U.S. International Trade Commission investigation of ribbons used on scrapbooks and floral arrangements imported from China and Taiwan.

  • November 10, 2009

    Dooney & Bourke Founder Gets 1 Yr. For Oil Conspiracy

    A judge has sentenced the co-founder of bag maker Dooney & Bourke to a year and a day in prison after a jury convicted him of conspiring to violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and making false statements over a plan to profit from the privatization of Azerbaijan's state oil company.

  • November 10, 2009

    OFAC Issues Guidelines For Enforcing Sanctions Laws

    The U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control has issued new guidelines on the enforcement of economic sanctions against foreign countries, outlining disclosure requirements and possible penalties for companies subject to economic sanctions laws.

  • November 10, 2009

    Senate Climate Debate Turns To Job, Trade Protection

    Energy industry representatives lined up Tuesday to caution members of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee that climate legislation without strong international, domestic and regional protections could create an economic void that green energy advances may not be able to fill.

  • November 10, 2009

    Turkish Co. Gets 'Academic' Dumping Margin On Steel

    On remand from the U.S. International Trade Commission, the Department of Commerce has assigned a dumping margin of 0.7 percent for imported steel concrete reinforcing bars from Turkey, but lawyers for the domestic companies that called for the review say the issue has become largely academic.

  • November 10, 2009

    ITC Bans Import Of Samsung LCD Products

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has banned imports of Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. liquid crystal display televisions, finding that they infringe valid patents held by rival Sharp Corp. and that a ban won't harm the U.S. economy.

  • November 10, 2009

    Q&A With Barnes & Thornburg's Karen McGee

    We will see an increasing need to provide practical solutions to U.S. businesses so they can continue to comply with U.S. trade regulations and navigate the increasingly strict enforcement climate, while competing globally, particularly with foreign companies subject to less stringent trade regulations, says Karen A. McGee, head of Barnes & Thornburg LLP's international trade practice.

  • November 9, 2009

    ITC Finds Possible Injury From Chinese Salt Imports

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has affirmed injury or the threat of injury to the U.S. economy on three of four phosphates imported from China that are under investigation for possible anti-dumping and countervailing duties.

  • November 9, 2009

    US Fights Shell Drawback Bid Over Oil Exports

    The U.S. government is urging the U.S. Court of International Trade to rule against Shell Oil Co. in a dispute over drawbacks for oil shipments bound for export, saying the company did not seek the fees within the three-year statutory time limit.

  • November 9, 2009

    Q&A With Gray Plant Mooty's Carl Zwisler

    For a lawyer who is supposed to understand the law, providing advice on franchising in China remains a challenge, says Carl E. Zwisler, a principal in Gray Plant Mooty's franchise and distribution practice group.