International Trade

  • May 19, 2021

    Sens. Expand Massive Tech Bill Aimed At China

    Senators have dramatically revamped a sprawling bill with well over $170 billion in funding to fuel technological and economic competition with China, including $52 billion for domestic semiconductor production and $1.5 billion for telecommunications funding along with intellectual property enforcement and boosted antitrust enforcement.

  • May 19, 2021

    PetroSaudi Slams 'Overbroad' Bid For Piece Of $330M Award

    PetroSaudi urged a California federal judge to reject federal prosecutors' proposed warrant to seize funds allegedly tied to the 1MDB scandal, saying Wednesday the "overbroad" warrant would leave the U.S. court "fundamentally and untenably at odds" with a London court.

  • May 19, 2021

    Australia, Canada Reach Deal On Imported Wine Sales

    Corks may be popping at the World Trade Organization this week after Australia and Canada notified the body of a deal to end their three-year-old dispute over restrictions on retail sales of foreign wines in the Great White North.

  • May 19, 2021

    Fla. Wholesaler Owes Duties On Mix Of New And Used Clothes

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has ordered a Florida clothing wholesaler to pay tariffs on a batch of imports, finding apparel subject to duties had been mixed in with duty-free secondhand clothes.

  • May 19, 2021

    GOP Sens. Bash COVID IP Waiver As 'Giveaway' To China

    A group of Republican senators on Wednesday sought more details from the Biden administration on its decision to back a temporary waiver on intellectual property protections related to COVID-19, warning that the waiver won't only cover vaccines and would help China and other countries that "regularly steal American intellectual property."

  • May 19, 2021

    Sens. Look To Bolster China Bill With Trade Enforcement

    As a massive bill aimed at countering China's rise courses through the U.S. Senate, two lawmakers are aiming to beef up the legislation with updates to strengthen the enforcement of the nation's trade remedy laws, Law360 confirmed Wednesday.

  • May 18, 2021

    New Labor Trade Fights May Rest On Diplomacy, Not Legalese

    Two landmark labor cases filed last week will test the strength of a new enforcement tool in the North American trade pact, even if the most likely outcome is a diplomatic resolution that will leave its full legal heft uncertain.

  • May 18, 2021

    Class Wants Clearview Blocked From Foreign Data Sharing

    Illinois residents suing Clearview AI over alleged violations of the Biometric Information Privacy Act on Tuesday urged the judge overseeing their multidistrict litigation to immediately block the facial recognition company from distributing their personal data after learning that it set up offshore companies to provide its software to foreign countries.

  • May 18, 2021

    Trade Court Backs Wheel Duties, But Not Retroactively

    A U.S. Court of International Trade judge validated the scope of a tariff exclusion on trailer wheels from China on Tuesday, affirming that only chrome wheels manufactured using highly toxic chemicals should be spared from the tariffs.

  • May 18, 2021

    Wyden Introduces Bill To Slash Hundreds Of Tariffs

    Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., unveiled new legislation to slash tariffs on hundreds of products Tuesday by reinstating broadly popular trade programs that lapsed at the end of 2020.

  • May 18, 2021

    Pa. Justices Ponder Cost Of Foreign Steel In Public Works

    Pennsylvania's Supreme Court justices wondered Tuesday where to draw the line for judging the final "cost" of a product made with steel, and how to then determine compliance with protectionist rules against selling public entities products that were more than 25% foreign steel.

  • May 18, 2021

    ​​​​​​​Myanmar Hit With More Sanctions In US Bid To Quell Violence

    The U.S. announced new sanctions targeting Myanmar's leadership since the Feb. 1 coup d'etat, formally denouncing the ruling State Administrative Council and 16 individuals including cabinet ministers after another violent weekend fueled by protests and military suppression.

  • May 17, 2021

    US Targets Alleged ISIS Funders In New Sanctions Hit

    The Biden administration said Monday that it will sanction three men in Iraq and Turkey accused of coordinating financial assistance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

  • May 17, 2021

    9th Circ. Says No Class Cert. In '70s Singer's Royalties Battle

    The Ninth Circuit on Monday affirmed a lower court's decision that denied 1970s soul singer Lenny Williams' class certification bid in a suit alleging that thousands of Warner Music artists were underpaid millions of dollars in royalties, finding that the artists are atypical class members who "apparently would not be entitled to damages."

  • May 17, 2021

    Progressives Say Trump Changes Hindered Regulatory Portal

    Several left-leaning groups urged the Biden administration Monday to reverse a Trump-era overhaul of a key website the public uses to keep tabs on federal rulemaking activity, saying the changes diminished agencies' transparency.

  • May 17, 2021

    Full 5th Circ. Asked To Reconsider Navy Crash Suit

    Families of U.S. Navy sailors injured and killed in a crash in Japanese waters asked the full Fifth Circuit to revive their $287 million lawsuit against a Japanese shipping company, saying that though the panel dismissed their case, two judges said the case should be reheard en banc.

  • May 17, 2021

    CIT Again Sends Back Chinese Tire Cos. Dumping Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade ordered the Department of Commerce to again reconsider two Chinese off-road tire producers' hefty 105.31% anti-dumping tariffs, saying the department improperly presumed the two companies were under the control of the Chinese government.

  • May 17, 2021

    OneCoin, 'CryptoQueen,' Financier In Default In $4B Fraud Suit

    OneCoin Ltd., the fugitive "CryptoQueen" and a Florida financier have failed to respond to a proposed class action over the alleged $4 billion OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, according to documents filed Monday in New York federal court.

  • May 17, 2021

    US Finalizes Duties On Lawn Mowers From China, Vietnam

    The U.S. Department of Commerce finalized duties Monday stretching as high as 263% on lawn mowers imported from China and Vietnam, backing claims from domestic producers that the goods have benefited from unfair trade practices.

  • May 17, 2021

    Justices Shun Importers' $150M Fee Suit Against Puerto Rico

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused to take up a petition from two dozen importers challenging security fees on goods entering the Port of San Juan that they say unconstitutionally cost shipping companies more than $150 million.

  • May 17, 2021

    EU Punts Tariff Hike In Favor Of Steel Talks With US

    The European Union will not impose a planned tariff increase on key U.S. goods as the two governments announced new negotiations on global steel capacity Monday, fueling hopes for resolving a dispute that began in the Trump administration.

  • May 14, 2021

    Feds Push For Normal China Tariff Collection During Suit

    Government attorneys took a broad swipe at the raft of challenges to punitive tariffs on Chinese goods Friday, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade that collection of the levies should continue normally while the case plays out.

  • May 14, 2021

    Suit Alleges Symbion Owes $30M From Tanzanian Utility Job

    A Nevada entity that was assigned a nearly $30 million arbitral award originally issued to a Dubai-based heavy equipment rental company told a New York federal court U.S. international engineering contractor Symbion Power must hand over the money for rental bills associated with a Tanzania power project.

  • May 14, 2021

    Senate To Debate $110B Tech Funding Bill To Outdo China

    The U.S. Senate plans to move Monday toward passing a major $110 billion package to fund research and technology to hone the country's competitive edge against China, after lawmakers tacked on a raft of provisions including those opposing boycotts of Israel.

  • May 14, 2021

    ITC Moves Forward With Indian Soybean Meal Inquiry

    The U.S. International Trade Commission found that organic soybean meal from India is posing a threat to U.S. producers, allowing trade investigations of the imports to move ahead.

Expert Analysis

  • High Court Nazi Art Rulings Impede Restorative Justice

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent rulings in favor of the sovereigns in two cases involving art stolen by the Nazis, Germany v. Philipp and Hungary v. Simon, deprive victims of a domestic forum for restitution and leave them with the untested alternative of international arbitration, says Kathryn Lee Boyd at Hecht Partners.

  • UK High Court Imparts GDPR Risk Insight For US Companies

    Author Photo

    A U.K. court's recent Soriano v. Forensic News decision — that a U.S. publication didn't fall within the EU General Data Protection Regulation's territorial scope — should provide relief to U.S. companies but leaves open questions about which minimal commercial activities with the EU would create greater risks, says Kate Paine at Shook Hardy.

  • US Cos. Must Get Ready For EU Human Rights, Climate Policy

    Author Photo

    The European Union will likely adopt new human rights and climate change regulations for corporations — so U.S. companies and investors should assess their risk exposure and implement compliance processes tailored to their industries, locations and supply chains, say David Lakhdhir and Mark Bergman at Paul Weiss.

  • Series

    Judges On Race

    Author Photo

    On the heels of nationwide calls to address systemic racism and inequality, five sitting state and federal judges shed light on the disparities that exist in the justice system and how to guard against bias in this series of Law360 guest articles.

  • Aviation Cos. Can't Put Trade Compliance On Autopilot

    Author Photo

    U.S. trade pressure against China, Russia and other countries will likely remain a key priority under the Biden administration, so aviation companies that export their products must calibrate their compliance programs to account for shifting policy, updated blacklists and the specialized sanctions and export controls risks facing the aviation industry, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Law Firm Penalties On Departing Partners Just Got Riskier

    Author Photo

    A D.C. appeals court's recent decision in Jacobson Holman v. Gentner sharply limiting the ability of law firms to financially penalize departing partners continues a clear trend among court rulings and bar ethics opinions, and should encourage firms to review their partnership agreements for any ethical land mines, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • How Parties Can Prep For Global FRAND Jurisdictional Battles

    Author Photo

    As courts worldwide increasingly vie for jurisdiction in litigation over standard-essential patents licensed on fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory terms, parties should consider courts' capabilities, the local market's importance, and choice of law in their preferred venues, and carefully tailor remedy requests in complaints, says Brian Johnson at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • NJ Case Has Lessons On Arbitration Clauses In Atty Retainers

    Author Photo

    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Delaney v. Dickey tracks and builds on other jurisdictions' limitations on the enforceability of arbitration provisions in law firm retainer agreements, and provides useful guidance for lawyers hoping to bind clients to arbitration, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Inside New Export Rules On Foreign Military Intelligence Units

    Author Photo

    While export controls related to weapons proliferation are not new, recently their scope was significantly broadened by the U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security's new controls regarding military-intelligence end users and end uses, and its expansion of end-use controls related to nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and missiles, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Tips For Protecting Privilege When Working With Outside PR

    Author Photo

    As lawsuits stemming from companies' COVID-19 responses grow and businesses hire public relations firms to manage the fallout, companies and their counsel should consider strategies to best protect themselves in court — and in the court of public opinion — without stepping on a privilege land mine, say Daniella Main and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • 3 Procurement Priorities For Law Firms In Uncertain Times

    Author Photo

    As the pandemic and its associated economic disruption linger, law firm procurement teams should expand their objectives beyond purchasing and getting the best price for goods and services, to help firms become more nimble and achieve overarching strategic goals, says Lee Garbowitz at HBR Consulting.

  • An OFAC Compliance Checklist For Ransomware Payments

    Author Photo

    As the U.S. government heightens its scrutiny of ransomware payments, victims that pay extortion demands can follow 12 steps to help establish the requisite mitigation and due diligence to avoid penalties from the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • Examining EPO's Strict Approach To AI Patent Disclosure

    Author Photo

    Because a recent decision by the European Patent Office Boards of Appeal takes a potentially problematic strict approach to disclosure requirements for machine learning-related patent applications, U.S. applicants filing in the EU should disclose several specific data training sets, says Ronny Amirsehhi at Clifford Chance.

  • Opinion

    UK Is Proof Nonlawyer Ownership Threatens Legal Profession

    Author Photo

    Advocates claim that nonlawyer ownership of law firms — now allowed in Arizona — will increase low-income Americans' access to legal services, but the reality in the U.K. demonstrates that nonlawyer owners are drawn to profitable areas like personal injury and create serious conflicts of interest, say Austin Bersinger and Nicola Rossi at Bersinger Law.

  • Opinion

    US Trade And Domestic Economic Policy Should Align

    Author Photo

    Progressive international trade policy should offer economic benefits not just to U.S. companies competing internationally, but also to the middle class, say Jeff Weiss at Steptoe & Johnson and Livia Lam at Strategies 360.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the International Trade archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!