International Trade

  • February 07, 2024

    Trailer Co. Says Multisource Wheel Imports Didn't Skirt Duties

    A trailer manufacturer urged the U.S. Court of International Trade to unwind a ruling that it evaded tariffs reaching 680%, arguing it didn't know its wheels, made from materials from several countries, were covered by tariffs on Chinese wheels.

  • February 07, 2024

    Judge Newman's Suspension Upheld By US Panel

    The national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases on Wednesday affirmed Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension for refusing to undergo medical tests as part of a probe into her mental fitness, saying she hadn't shown good cause for not complying.

  • February 06, 2024

    DC Circ. Unsure FERC Can't Order NextEra To Cover Plant Costs

    NextEra Energy's request to be made whole for upgrades to its New Hampshire nuclear power plant's circuit breaker seemed to get a frosty reception from the D.C. Circuit during oral arguments Tuesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Fed Lifts Actions Against BNP Paribas, Tiny FTX-Linked Bank

    The Federal Reserve Board has ended enforcement actions it brought against Washington-based Farmington State Bank and France's BNP Paribas, the regulator announced Tuesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Report Shows Fragile US Solar Growth Under Safeguard

    The U.S. solar energy industry has grown despite bumpy conditions since 2020 and is on track to expand into photovoltaic cell production before the end of the year, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Pemex Exec Tells Jury Of Vitol Bribes For $200M Gas Deal

    A former executive of a unit of Mexico's state-owned oil and gas company on Tuesday told a Brooklyn federal jury of how he and a colleague agreed to accept hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes from Vitol Group, in exchange for confidential information to help the Geneva-based energy-trading giant win a $200 million gas contract.

  • February 06, 2024

    Trade Commission Reverses Course, Calls Off Tin Mill Probes

    The U.S. International Trade Commission determined Tuesday that tin mill products from Canada, China and Germany are not harming the domestic industry unfairly, freeing the imports from looming anti-dumping and countervailing duties set by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds Fight Sen. Menendez's Bids To Nix Charges, Split Trials

    Federal prosecutors have asked a New York federal court to reject requests from U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez to dismiss his corruption case and to sever his trial from his wife's, arguing that the senator made "premature" factual arguments and incorrectly claimed immunity from prosecution as a senator.

  • February 05, 2024

    SEC's SolarWinds Suit May Chill Disclosures, Ex-Officials Say

    A group of 21 former government officials from both Democratic and Republican administrations has urged a New York federal court to consider the possible chilling effects of public-private information sharing on cyber incidents in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's case against SolarWinds.

  • February 05, 2024

    US Backs Spain In $386M Solar Award Cases

    The Biden administration is urging the D.C. Circuit not to enforce some $386 million in arbitral awards issued to investors after Spain dialed back its renewable energy incentives, arguing that courts need not defer to arbitrators when deciding whether an arbitration agreement exists.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Wants 'Public Servant' Cut From FCPA Case

    A former Texas oil trader accused of bribery by federal prosecutors in New York has asked a judge to reject the government's argument that employees of a U.S.-based affiliate of Mexico's state-owned oil company should be considered "public servants" under Mexico's anti-bribery law.

  • February 05, 2024

    Caterpillar Gets Tweaks To Antitrust Suit Blocked

    A Delaware federal judge has refused to let a defunct construction equipment supplier add a new legal theory in its long-running antitrust case accusing Caterpillar of pressuring an online auctioneer to break its contract with a would-be competitor, finding no good cause to permit amendment years after the deadline.

  • February 05, 2024

    Senate Confirms Schagrin Partner To International Trade Court

    The Senate voted 76-0 on Monday evening to confirm Schagrin Associates partner Joseph Laroski Jr. to the U.S. Court of International Trade, the second confirmation for this court in the past week. 

  • February 05, 2024

    FERC Says It Followed Court's Orders With LNG Reapproval

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defended its reapproval of a Texas liquefied natural gas terminal Monday, telling the D.C. Circuit it addressed the appeals court's concerns after the court ordered the agency to revise its environmental reviews of the project.

  • February 05, 2024

    Lawmaker Seeks Rice Probe, Suspects Unfair Subsidies Afoot

    The chair of the House Ways and Means Committee pressed the U.S. International Trade Commission to investigate the global rice market, expressing suspicions on Monday that overseas government assistance may be harming the U.S. rice sector.

  • February 05, 2024

    GOP Lawmakers' Concerns Spur Talks On German Royalty Tax

    House Ways and Means Committee Republicans have been in touch with U.S. Treasury Department officials to address the lawmakers' concerns about a German withholding tax imposed on intellectual property registered in the country, a GOP lawmaker told Law360.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Seeks To Stay Free Amid Appeal

    Former Trump White House adviser Peter Navarro argued Friday for remain out of custody pending appeal of his four-month sentence for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas related to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, citing "close questions" about whether he should've been able to assert an executive privilege defense.

  • February 02, 2024

    Atty Says Feds Duped Grand Jury In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    Newly disclosed evidence of prosecutorial misconduct should end charges against a Maryland lawyer headed to trial in March over the alleged misappropriation of over $12 million in Somali state assets, his legal team told a federal judge Friday.

  • February 02, 2024

    US Chamber Calls SEC SolarWinds Suit An FCPA 'Power Grab'

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Friday urged a New York federal court to ax the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's suit against software provider SolarWinds Corp., saying the agency is using a provision of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act as a power grab for broader corporate policing authority.

  • February 02, 2024

    Wells Fargo Gets Elder Abuse Suit Dismissed, For Now

    A California federal judge on Thursday dismissed a lawsuit accusing Wells Fargo of facilitating a financial scam against a senior, saying that while the bank's employees should have known something was suspicious about the victim's transactions, the bank's alleged actions did not inherently constitute elder abuse.

  • February 02, 2024

    Aviation Biz Can't Recoup Duty With Floating Text, Judge Says

    An airplane parts manufacturer couldn't claw back the duties it paid on imports that were ultimately reexported, failing to convince the U.S. Court of International Trade that floating text in the tariff schedule qualified the items for a duty drawback.

  • February 02, 2024

    BAT, Philip Morris Reach Patent Deal For Global Vape IP Fights

    British American Tobacco and Philip Morris International Inc. said Friday that the companies had come to a settlement resolving multiple heated tobacco and vape patent infringement suits.

  • February 02, 2024

    Feds Charge 9 With Trafficking Sanctioned Iranian Oil

    Nine foreign nationals have been charged with running an oil trafficking network to sell sanctioned fuel that helped finance the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which the U.S. government considers a terrorist organization, the Department of Justice said Friday.

  • February 02, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen Dentons sued by a former high-profile partner in Saudi Arabia, Jaguar Land Rover rev its engine in the intellectual property court against automotive company HaynesPro, and the Russian National Reinsurance Company tackle a settlement with BOC Aviation over stranded aircraft. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 02, 2024

    GSA Lets Contractors Claim Rising Red Sea Shipping Costs

    The U.S. General Services Administration has authorized agencies participating in its employee relocation program to reimburse shipping companies the extra costs of rerouting household goods shipments to avoid Houthi attacks on the Red Sea.

Expert Analysis

  • How FinCEN's Proposed Rule Stirs The Pot On Crypto Mixing

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    The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network’s recently issued proposal aims to impose additional reporting requirements to mitigate the risks posed by convertible virtual currency mixing transactions, meaning financial institutions may need new monitoring techniques to detect CVC mixing beyond just exposure, say Jared Johnson and Jordan Yeagley at Buchanan Ingersoll.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • Unpacking Long-Awaited Clean Energy Tax Credit Guidance

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    Recently proposed Internal Revenue Service regulations provide welcome confirmatory guidance on the application of investment tax credits as reworked by 2022's Inflation Reduction Act, prevailing wage and apprenticeship rules that are largely consistent with market expectations, and broader eligibility criteria that should please the wind power industry in particular, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • A Comparison Of Patent Dispute Resolution In US And China

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    As the U.S. and China are the two most significant arenas for patent disputes, multinational corporations must be able to navigate their patent dispute systems, which differ in speed, cost and potential damage awards, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Key Takeaways From DOJ's Recent FARA Advisory Opinions

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    The U.S. Department of Justice recently published several redacted advisory opinions on the Foreign Agents Registration Act, clarifying its current thinking on when a person or entity is required to register as a foreign agent under the statute, and when they may qualify for an exemption, says Tessa Capeloto at Wiley Rein.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • A Closer Look At The Sen. Menendez Indictment

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    Attorneys at Dowd Bennett analyze the latest charges filed against Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and four co-defendants — from bribery to acting as a foreign agent — potential defenses that may be mounted, and broader lessons for white collar attorneys.

  • A Look At Enforcing And Contesting Arbitral Awards In Qatar

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    As Qatar aspires to become a regional investment hub as part of its Qatar Vision 2030, it has committed to modernizing its arbitration practices in accordance with international standards, including updating the process of enforcing and contesting arbitration awards, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Deal Over Jets Stranded In Russia May Serve As Blueprint

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    In the face of a pending "mega-trial" over leased airplanes held in Russia after its invasion of Ukraine, a settlement between leading aviation lessor AerCap Holdings NV and NSK, the Russian state-controlled insurance company, could pave the way for similar deals, say Samantha Zaozirny and Timeyin Pinnick at Browne Jacobson.

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