International Trade

  • June 01, 2022

    Boeing Helicopters To Replace Lockheed Martin's In Germany

    Boeing announced Wednesday that the German government chose its CH-47F Chinook to fulfill the heavy transport helicopter requirements of its Schwerer Transporthubschrauber program.

  • June 01, 2022

    Firearm Aiming Systems Co. Sues CBP, Claims Duties Error

    A manufacturer of firearm aiming systems has accused U.S. Customs and Border Protection of unlawfully assessing duties on its imports of aiming aids, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade that the imports should be classified as duty-free.

  • June 01, 2022

    US, Taiwan Look To Grow Economic Ties With Trade Forum

    The U.S. and Taiwan announced a new trade initiative on Wednesday that seeks to deepen economic ties by expanding trade and harmonizing regulatory practices.

  • June 01, 2022

    Swiss Regulator Extends Sberbank Transactions Suspension

    Switzerland's finance watchdog said Wednesday that it will extend the suspension of Sberbank's Swiss arm until August because of continuing liquidity risks and greater Western sanctions on the bank, dealing yet another blow to Russia's largest lender.

  • May 31, 2022

    New US Gun Export Rule Will Require Notice To Congress

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Tuesday made public its plan for Congress to be told about certain pending deals to export semiautomatic firearms after the previous presidential administration loosened restrictions for selling weapons overseas.

  • May 31, 2022

    Commerce Must Rethink Harsh Rod Levies, Trade Court Says

    The U.S. Court of International Trade ordered the federal government to rethink countervailing duties placed on Chinese threaded rod, ruling that there isn't enough evidence to prove that two Chinese producers used a state-subsidized loan program to gain an unfair advantage over U.S. competitors.

  • May 31, 2022

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Stingers And Microsoft

    In May, the U.S. Army began replenishing missile systems dispatched to Ukraine, while the Naval Postgraduate School and Microsoft announced that they were collaborating on cloud services and a smart campus. Here are Law360's top government contracts for May 2022.

  • May 31, 2022

    EU Heads Agree To 90% Russian Oil Ban, Sberbank Sanctions

    European Union government heads said Tuesday they have agreed on new Russian sanctions that include a 90% cut in the country's oil imports by the end of the year and the expulsion of Sberbank, Russia's largest lender, from the SWIFT global financial messaging system.

  • May 30, 2022

    Law360 Names 2022's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2022, our list of 176 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • May 30, 2022

    Russia's Central Bank Freezes Some Foreign Shares

    The St. Petersburg Stock Exchange JSC said on Monday that it will put up to 14% of its clients' U.S.-listed shares into a non-trading account after the country's central bank restricted trading of some foreign shares.

  • May 27, 2022

    US Says $380M Is Fair Game In 1MDB Case

    The U.S. government on Friday told the Ninth Circuit it should uphold a ruling allowing American prosecutors to seize a nearly $380 million arbitral award, telling the appeals court the opposition has argued itself out of court.

  • May 27, 2022

    Cyber Training Center To Give State AGs Enforcement Boost

    State attorneys general have launched a new center to bolster their coordination and education on cyber and technology issues, putting them on stronger footing to pursue more complex probes into how BigTech and other major companies use and secure consumers' data.

  • May 27, 2022

    DC Circ. Greenlights Defamation Suit Against UK Activist

    The D.C. Circuit has ruled that a lobbyist labeled as a former Russian-American spy by a prominent U.K.-based political activist can sue for defamation, finding that the District of Columbia's "long-arm" statute applies because of the activist's Washington, D.C.-based government affairs.

  • May 27, 2022

    USTR Again Extends China Tariff Reprieve For COVID-19 Gear

    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has extended tariff cuts on Chinese medical equipment Friday, marking its second extension of the duty reprieve amid the long tail of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • May 27, 2022

    Mintz Builds ITC Practice With Maynard Cooper Hire

    Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo PC is again boosting the firm's intellectual property practice at the U.S. International Trade Commission with a new hire, adding a lawyer from Maynard Cooper & Gale PC who says she's excited to get back to work litigating at the Washington, D.C., trade commission.

  • May 27, 2022

    CIT Keeps Steel Duty Case Moving Amid Injury Appeal

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has declined the government's bid to stay a case over its duties on Mexican structural steel despite an appeal in a pending case that could render the dispute moot.

  • May 27, 2022

    Isolated Russian Banks Reconsidering Basel Rulebook

    The head of a major bank in Russia has called for the country to replace the international Basel banking regulations with a wholly Russian version, which could put the country still reeling from Western sanctions into deeper economic isolation.

  • May 26, 2022

    Farmers, Senators Vie For Biden's Ear On China Tariffs

    The Biden administration has been sent dueling letters regarding the future of strict Trump-era China tariffs, from farm groups that want the tariffs lifted and from U.S. senators pressuring the White House to hold firm.

  • May 26, 2022

    IP Forecast: Pepsi To Fight For 'Rise' TM At 2nd Circ.

    Pepsi heads to the Second Circuit next week to argue that a lower court wrongly agreed with a coffee company to block the soft drink giant from using the word "Rise" in the branding of Mountain Dew's new energy drink. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • May 26, 2022

    Dutch Lien On MD Helicopters' Factory Denied In Ch. 11

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge ruled Thursday that a $16.1 million judgment lien held by the Dutch government against bankrupt aviation company MD Helicopters did not attach to the debtor's manufacturing facility in Arizona, saying state law there classified leasehold interests as personal property rather than real property.

  • May 26, 2022

    DOD Bars Contracts With Ties To Venezuelan Gov't

    Individuals and companies doing business with the Venezuelan government will no longer be allowed to enter into contracts with the U.S. Department of Defense, according to a final rule published by the department.

  • May 26, 2022

    Commerce Crystallizes Trade Curbs On Hacking Tools

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has finalized cybersecurity export controls intended to frustrate foreign actors' access to tools that can be used for human rights abuses, according to a notice in the Federal Register.

  • May 26, 2022

    Aircraft Lender Sues Russian Carrier For £339M In Lost Planes

    The world's largest aircraft lessor has sued a Russian carrier for £339 million ($427 million), accusing it of using sanctions as cover to keep eight Boeing airplanes in the latest dispute stemming from the Western crackdown on Moscow.

  • May 26, 2022

    Ex-ADI Engineer Cleared Of Most Charges In Trade Secret Trial

    A Boston federal jury on Thursday acquitted a former Analog Devices Inc. engineer on all but one charge in a case alleging he stole company trade secrets to jump-start a side business selling computer chips and violated export laws by shipping the schematics overseas.

  • May 25, 2022

    Airbus Investors Ink $5M Deal Over Corruption Probes

    Airbus investors on Tuesday asked a New Jersey federal judge to greenlight a $5 million settlement resolving their claims that the defense contractor's executives misled shareholders about corruption probes and a subsequent $4 billion settlement that led to multiple stock drops over a four-year period.

Expert Analysis

  • Export Control Compliance Amid Stricter Russia Restrictions

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    As the Biden administration steps up export control enforcement and implements an unprecedented sanctions program targeting Russia, exporters should tailor their compliance programs, identify heightened compliance risks and consider voluntarily disclosing existing violations, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Cos. Must Prepare For Emerging ESG Risks In Supply Chains

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    U.S. legislative developments on forced labor in Xinjiang, greenhouse gas emissions and fashion industry transparency will affect corporate supply chain management, so companies should take several steps to prepare for current and anticipated regulation of ESG risks, say Sara Orr and Jacqueline Yap at Kirkland.

  • How To Avoid Prematurely Publicizing A Case Outcome

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    The lessons of a recent U.K. case involving Matrix Chambers' premature social media posts that violated a court embargo are relevant in the U.S. as well, reminding law firms to ensure plans to publicize a case are shielded from accidental violations of court sealing and gag orders, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • The ITC's Crucial Role In Countering Russia's Aggression

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    As a recent letter from Ohio senators points out, the U.S. International Trade Commission should address the extraordinary danger Russia's litany of violations against international order present to ensure full enforcement of U.S. trade remedy laws, say Scott Kieff at George Washington University Law School and Thomas Grant at Cambridge University.

  • SEC's Ripple Case Shows Limits Of Outdated Securities Test

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s case against Ripple Labs is just one example of its aggressive approach to defining cryptocurrencies as securities, putting the crypto industry at risk and demonstrating why a new test is needed to determine which digital assets should register with the SEC, says J.W. Verret at George Mason University.

  • How To Wind Down Patents In Russia Over Next 3 Months

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    With June 23 approaching as the last day on which U.S. businesses may pay anything to the Russian patent office for filing patents directly or through international Patent Cooperation Treaty applications, practitioners should begin making crucial filing and search decisions now to avoid liability, says Mark Mathison at Kilpatrick.

  • Russia-Exposed Cos. Should Plan For Sanctions Litigation

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    Attorneys at Steptoe & Johnson discuss how Russia-exposed businesses can mitigate new risks of lawsuits brought in Russia under Russian countersanctions laws, issues related to contract rights, and claims from parties harmed by the war in Ukraine.

  • Key Facets Of Final Buy American Rule For Gov't Contractors

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    Federal contractors must understand how and when the Buy American sourcing rules included in recent amendments to the Federal Acquisition Regulation apply so they can determine the impact on their contracts and supply chains, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Regulating Crypto Shouldn't Hinge On Securities Status

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    President Joe Biden's recent executive order on digital assets signals that the government recognizes the importance of crypto markets, but effective oversight cannot occur unless federal agencies reevaluate their approach to regulating crypto only in the context of deciding whether they are securities, say Joseph Hall and Jai Massari at Davis Polk.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Hold DC Judges Accountable For Misconduct

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    On the heels of Thursday's congressional hearing on workplace protections for judiciary employees, former law clerk Aliza Shatzman recounts her experience of harassment by a D.C. Superior Court judge — and argues that the proposed Judiciary Accountability Act, which would extend vital anti-discrimination protections to federal court employees, should also include D.C. courts.

  • Executive Order Is First Step In Supporting Digital Assets

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    President Joe Biden recently issued an executive order that outlines a whole-of-government approach to supporting digital asset innovation, and while it demonstrates a commitment to providing regulatory clarity for the development and use of cryptocurrency, the process for doing so will be time-consuming and multifaceted, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • How Multinationals Can Withstand US-China Trade Conflict

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    Multinational companies caught between conflicting trade laws as a result of growing tension between the U.S. and China should set up contingency plans and triage teams to address enforcement risk, and move forward any compliance audits they may have planned, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Aviation Watch: How Russia Sanctions Will Affect Aviation

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    Sanctions levied against Russia in the wake of its invasion of Ukraine will likely leave the country with almost no national air transport industry, but will also have significant impacts on the Western aviation sector as well, from complicating flight paths to jeopardizing leasing arrangements, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • What Tighter Sanctions Against Russia Mean For Companies

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    Amid U.S. sanctions on Russia in response to its invasion of Ukraine, companies and individuals with business relationships in that region should expect disruptions to payment and transactions systems, and should prepare for increased diligence and compliance requirements, say George Wang and Abram Ellis at Simpson Thacher.

  • 4 Ways To Preserve Confidentiality Of Litigation Funding Docs

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    Though two recent rulings by Massachusetts and Illinois federal courts add to the growing body of case law denying discovery into litigation funding arrangements, prudence necessitates that lawyers, clients and funders follow certain best practices to ensure that their communications are not discoverable by opposing parties, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

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