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Intellectual Property

  • January 15, 2019

    Rihanna Says Father Can't Stand Under Her Name's Umbrella

    Music icon Rihanna demanded on Tuesday that her father stop exploiting her name and brand to fraudulently make "millions of dollars" through his company Fenty Entertainment LLC, according to a lawsuit filed in California federal court.

  • January 15, 2019

    PTAB Hears First Case Under New Relaxed Patent Guidelines

    A Patent Trial and Appeal Board panel questioned two companies Tuesday about four patents covering methods of electronically storing financial documents, just days after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office released new guidelines on patent applications that include previously ineligible material.

  • January 15, 2019

    Greatbatch Gets $22M In Redo Of Pacemaker Patent Trial

    Medical device maker Greatbatch Ltd. received a $22 million damages award Monday following a six-day trial in Delaware federal court over three pacemaker technology patents infringed by AVX Corp., replacing a 2016 jury decision that awarded it $37.5 million.

  • January 15, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Alice Ax Of Monitoring Software Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday upheld a lower court decision invalidating four Power Analytics Corp. patents covering software for monitoring electrical systems under the U.S. Supreme Court Alice decision.

  • January 15, 2019

    Ericsson Fights HTC's Bid To Delay Trial Over Patent Royalties

    Ericsson has urged a Texas federal court not to delay a trial scheduled for next month on HTC Corp.'s accusation that Ericsson overcharged for royalties on cellular and wireless standard-essential patents, arguing there's no need to wait until after an arbitrator decides if some issues should be arbitrated.

  • January 15, 2019

    Wabtec Raps 'Desperate' Siemens In $8.3M Railroad IP Suit

    Westinghouse Air Brake Technologies Corp. on Tuesday called a battery of Siemens Mobility Inc. patent infringement claims "desperate" gambits by a latecomer to the U.S. rail safety market, during opening statements in Delaware for a nine-day $8.3 million federal jury trial.

  • January 15, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Upholds Apple’s $440M Loss In VirnetX Patent Case

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday upheld a $440 million Eastern District of Texas judgment that Apple Inc. infringed four VirnetX Inc. network security patents, although it put off ruling on whether to affirm Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions invalidating the patents.

  • January 15, 2019

    Fed. Circ. OKs PTAB Decision Letting Patentee Amend Claims

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday upheld the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s decision to let the owner of an automotive patent amend some claims in an inter partes review after the claims were deemed invalid, leaving in place a rare ruling by the board that found proposed substitute claims patentable.

  • January 15, 2019

    Celebrity News Blog Sued Over Photo Of Hernandez's Fiancee

    Gossip website Hollywoodlife.com has become the latest media outlet sued by photography agency Polaris Images Corp. for allegedly publishing a photograph of the late NFL player Aaron Hernandez's pregnant former fiancée without permission.

  • January 15, 2019

    Drink Co. Wants Bradley Arant DQ'd After Jump To Rival

    A coffee and tea company facing a patent infringement suit over its sweet tea drink told an Alabama federal court its attorneys of nearly a decade at Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP dumped the company and entered an appearance for the other side in the case less than an hour later.

  • January 15, 2019

    PTAB To Review Patent At Center Of Qualcomm, Apple Fight

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board agreed Tuesday to review a Qualcomm Inc. patent related to cellular technology that some Apple Inc. iPhones were previously found to infringe, saying parts of the patent are likely invalid.

  • January 15, 2019

    IP Group Of The Year: Fish & Richardson

    Fish & Richardson PC successfully overturned two major jury verdicts — including the largest patent infringement award in U.S. history — for its client Gilead Sciences Inc., while also notching victories for companies such as Altair Engineering Inc. and Velcro USA Inc., earning the firm a spot among Law360's Intellectual Property Practice Groups of the Year.

  • January 15, 2019

    Edwards Pays Boston Scientific $180M, Ending All IP Fights

    Edwards Lifesciences Corp. has agreed to pay Boston Scientific Corp. $180 million to settle all patent litigation worldwide tied to coronary repair devices, the companies announced Tuesday.

  • January 15, 2019

    Heinz Faces Trademark Suit Over New 'Mayochup' Sauce

    The Kraft Heinz Co. was hit with a trademark lawsuit Monday over its recent launch of a mayonnaise-ketchup spread called "Mayochup," a name that a Louisiana sauce maker says is too much like the "Metchup" he has used for a decade on his similar product.

  • January 14, 2019

    Oracle, Rimini Spar At High Court Over Copyright Costs

    Attorneys for Oracle and a technical support service called Rimini Street Inc. faced off Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court over how much a winning copyright litigant can recoup in legal bills, offering the justices sharply divergent views on what lawmakers meant by “full costs.”

  • January 14, 2019

    Comcast Sued Again Over DVR Tech In TiVo IP Battle

    A TiVo Corp. unit filed new patent infringement allegations Monday in California federal court over the digital video recording technology in Comcast Corp.'s set-top boxes, despite the Patent Trial and Appeal Board finding related patents to be invalid.

  • January 14, 2019

    GTC Law Group Settles Chancery Fight Over IP Asset Sale

    GTC Law Group told a Delaware Chancery Court judge Monday that it had reached a settlement deal for a temporary restraining order with a secured lender of its client Osterhout Group Inc. that will allow a sale of the technology company to move forward while setting aside up to $700,000 in unpaid legal fees.

  • January 14, 2019

    Allergan's Attack On Drug Compounding Falls Flat

    A California federal judge has rejected Allergan Inc.’s high-stakes effort to make many drug compounding activities unlawful, saying he will defer to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision to allow the activities.

  • January 14, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Generics Win In Colitis Patent Suit

    The Federal Circuit on Monday upheld a lower court ruling that cleared Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Alvogen Pine Brook LLC of patent infringement in a lawsuit over the companies’ generic versions of the colitis medication Uceris.

  • January 14, 2019

    Baker Botts Defeats Takeda’s DQ Bid In Heartburn Drug Fight

    Baker Botts LLP can continue representing Zydus Pharmaceuticals as it pursues antitrust claims against Takeda over a heartburn medication, despite the law firm’s prior representation of Takeda’s ally in patent litigation over the same drug, a New Jersey federal judge said in a ruling made public Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • Murky Parts Of The New USPTO Patent Eligibility Guidance

    Lawrence Ashery

    While the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's 2019 revised patent subject matter eligibility guidance is a well-written document that relies on considerable case law to support its position, it has certain limitations, says Lawrence Ashery of Caesar Rivise PC.

  • The Trump Administration's Latest Drug Pricing Initiatives

    Tom Bulleit

    In 2018, the Trump administration took few concrete steps that will significantly impact drug prices in the near future. The most consequential ideas lack political support, while the more feasible ideas are unlikely to change much, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Illustrating The New USPTO Guidance With A Flowchart

    Stephen Glazier

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's 2019 revised patent eligibility guidance can be summarized and restated as a process of four sequential questions to apply the Alice-Mayo test for a Section 101 analysis, says Stephen Glazier of Akerman LLP.

  • Automotive Tech In 2018: Legal Trends And Developments

    David Cavanaugh

    The legal landscape for the automotive sector continued its evolution in 2018 with the development of new technology becoming a focal point for litigation, patenting and regulation, say attorneys with WilmerHale.

  • Did High Court Overrule Fed. Circ. On Foreign Lost Profits?

    Andrew Michaels

    The Federal Circuit recently agreed to consider whether its decision in Power Integrations v. Fairchild was "implicitly overruled" by the U.S. Supreme Court's WesternGeco ruling. Andrew Michaels of the University of Houston Law Center examines how one may know when a circuit court precedent has been overruled by the Supreme Court.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • What To Expect From 'Scandalous' Trademark Case

    Jennifer Ko Craft

    With the U.S. Supreme Court set to hear the case on Brunetti's "immoral and scandalous" trademark, our money is on Brunetti getting a registration. And the ruling could have an even greater impact than the Tam decision on "disparaging" trademarks, say Jennifer Ko Craft and Hilary Williams of Dickinson Wright PLLC.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 1

    Peter Jarvis

    Contrary to what the New York City Bar Association concluded in an ethics opinion last year, lawyer-directed nonrecourse commercial litigation funding does not violate New York rules on sharing fees with nonlawyers, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.