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Legal Ethics

  • June 12, 2018

    J&J Secretly Funded Talc Study, Atty Claims

    Johnson & Johnson secretly funded research that found talcum powder does not cause ovarian cancer through the law firm of Crowell & Moring LLP, an attorney for 22 women suing the pharma conglomerate told a St. Louis jury Tuesday.

  • June 12, 2018

    Would-Be Whistleblower's Malpractice Suit Moves Forward

    A finance executive had little choice but to settle his dispute with an old employer and accept less money in a mediation after his lawyer let the clock run out on multiple claims stemming from his termination, a New York federal judge said Monday.

  • June 12, 2018

    Jury Deadlocks In Pa. Public Defenders' Age-Bias Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal jury has deadlocked over allegations the Allegheny County Office of the Public Defender passes over older attorneys for promotions and assigns them undesirable work, resulting in a mistrial.

  • June 12, 2018

    New Firm Ripped Off Lawyer's 'Sterling' Reputation: Suit

    A pair of Illinois attorneys are battling over who can rightly use “Sterling" in their law firm name, with the fight escalating to a trademark suit filed in Illinois federal court on Tuesday.

  • June 12, 2018

    No Bail For Atty Accused Of Lengthy Cyberstalking Campaign

    A lawyer charged with a multiyear campaign of making threats against a woman he briefly dated was denied bail Tuesday by a Manhattan federal judge, who saw a mix of circumstances that created a "serious risk" that the suspect might harm or threaten the woman if released.

  • June 12, 2018

    Venezuela's Foley Hoag Attys Can Depart Crystallex Appeal

    The D.C. Circuit said Tuesday that Foley Hoag LLP could withdraw as counsel for Venezuela in its appeal of a district court's confirmation of bankrupt miner Crystallex International Corp.'s $1.2 billion arbitral award, instructing the beleaguered country to secure new representation by July 16.

  • June 12, 2018

    ABA Revokes Accreditation From For-Profit Ariz. Law School

    In what the American Bar Association says may be the first time an operating law school’s accreditation approval has been involuntarily revoked, the organization announced last week that it is withdrawing its stamp of approval from for-profit Arizona Summit Law School and giving the school 10 days to appeal.

  • June 12, 2018

    Litigation Support Co. In Hot Water As Belkin IP Trial Starts

    Opening statements kicked off Tuesday in a California federal trial over Kenu Inc.’s claims Belkin infringed a patent for in-car phone holders, but before the proceedings even began, news that Belkin’s litigation support company forged a court officer’s signature prompted the presiding judge to call for criminal fraud charges against the vendor.

  • June 12, 2018

    Pa. Atty Suspended After Guilty Plea In Gambling Scheme

    A Pennsylvania attorney has agreed to a suspension of his law license following a guilty plea last year on misdemeanor charges stemming from allegations that he aided a state lawmaker to support an Allegheny County illegal gambling ring.

  • June 12, 2018

    Pa. Atty Suspended For Conflict In Campus Sex Assault Case

    A Pennsylvania attorney has been hit with a one-year suspension for representing a Swarthmore College student accused of sexual assault after he previously represented a leader of a group of anti-sexual assault activists at the school, which he then referred to as an "angry feminist cabal" after switching sides.

  • June 12, 2018

    Ex-Locke Lord Partner Faces Financial Fraud Charges In UK

    A former banking partner at Locke Lord LLP will face two counts of fraud in an English court in July for allegedly inflicting financial losses on members of a multimillion-pound investment scheme, the Crown Prosecution Service told Law360 on Tuesday.

  • June 11, 2018

    Ex-KPMG Partner Says Feds Sitting On Evidence

    A former audit partner at KPMG LLP has asked a Brooklyn federal judge to make prosecutors look for exculpatory evidence in files belonging to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and an accounting oversight group, saying both were essentially part of the prosecution team.

  • June 11, 2018

    Woeful Judge Won’t Free Attys From Kenyon Malpractice Suit

    A New York federal judge rejected a bid by two former Kenyon & Kenyon LLP lawyers to defeat claims that they bungled patent paperwork but called for “discretion and decency” at a Monday hearing and urged the parties to strike a deal that would let the individuals off the hook.

  • June 11, 2018

    Justices Turn Away Deportee's Due Process Appeal

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear the appeal of a deportee who claims he wasn’t told by his attorney or an immigration judge that he could fight his deportation, which he alleges was in violation of his due process rights.

  • June 11, 2018

    Dov Charney Must Pay Glaser Weil $2.2M After Arbitration

    A California judge on Monday confirmed an arbitrator's finding that Glaser Weil Fink Howard Avchen & Shapiro LLP did not commit legal malpractice while representing ousted American Apparel founder Dov Charney, and that Charney must pay the firm roughly $2.2 million in legal fees.

  • June 11, 2018

    Greenberg Traurig Slips $10M NY Film Financing Fraud Suit

    An investor who accused Greenberg Traurig LLP of fraud in a film financing deal gone bad had his claims rejected by a New York state judge on Monday, with the judge saying the investor’s lack of an attorney-client relationship with the firm cut against him.

  • June 11, 2018

    Inmate Can't Tie Atty Racism To Poor Counsel, 9th Circ. Says

    A California inmate serving a life sentence for murder and attempted murder lost his attempt in the Ninth Circuit to challenge his conviction, with the court saying Friday he had not shown that his lawyer's racism left him without effective counsel.

  • June 11, 2018

    Appeals Court Revives Malpractice Suit Over Chicago Condos

    An Illinois appeals court revived a developer's malpractice suit claiming his attorney botched legal documents necessary to preserve its rights to build condos and assign parking spaces in Chicago's Loop, ruling that the developer had filed its suit in time.

  • June 11, 2018

    Winston & Strawn Accused Of Conflict In Relativity Ch. 11

    Winston & Strawn LLP is facing heat for an alleged conflict of loyalties after agreeing to represent foundering production company Relativity Media LLC as it rushed into bankruptcy to head off a contract dispute with Netflix, despite representing the streaming entertainment service in separate patent litigation.

  • June 11, 2018

    Dentons Ignored Managing Director's Harassment, Suit Says

    Dentons ignored a female business development specialist who complained that the male managing director of the firm’s venture technology group repeatedly groped her and hit on her using graphic come-ons, according to a suit filed Monday in New York state court.

Expert Analysis

  • The Importance Of Attorney Etiquette In The Courtroom

    Christina Marinakis

    It’s difficult to say whether an attorney’s social etiquette has any impact on the verdict outcome, but the fact that jurors continually tell us about counsel’s irksome behaviors suggests that, at the very least, these behaviors distract jurors from the issues on which they should be concentrating, says Christina Marinakis, director of jury research at Litigation Insights.

  • Opinion

    Roman J. Israel, Esquire, Meet Donald J. Trump, POTUS

    Kevin Curnin

    Despite the Trump administration's desire to shut down the Legal Services Corp., thankfully the budget that Congress passed and the president signed into law last week has restored $410 million of funding to the legal aid organization. An unlikely brief for preserving LSC may be found in the quirky Denzel Washington film "Roman J. Israel, Esq.," says Kevin Curnin, immediate past president of the Association of Pro Bono Counsel.

  • Opinion

    We Need A Cybersecurity Framework For Law Firms

    Shaun Jamison

    In order to enable lawyers to best meet cybersecurity challenges, state bars should pass rules that adopt a cybersecurity framework to be developed by a national committee, says Shaun Jamison, associate dean of faculty and professor at Purdue University's Concord Law School.

  • Equity Partnership Isn’t What It Used To Be

    Jeff Liebster

    To many young attorneys, becoming an equity partner shows a firm's long-term commitment, meaning job security and a voice in important firm matters. However, the industry has changed and nowadays it may not be better to enter a new firm as an equity partner, says Jeffrey Liebster of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Hardiman Reviews 'Without Precedent'

    Judge Thomas Hardiman

    In his new book, "Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times," professor Joel Richard Paul ably explains more than a dozen of Marshall’s most significant opinions, which comes as no surprise​. ​What is a surprise — a pleasant one — is the book's readability, says Judge Thomas Hardiman of the Third Circuit.

  • Top Tax Changes For Law Firms: What Lawyers Need To Know

    Evan Morgan

    For law firms structured as corporations, a lower maximum corporate tax rate and repeal of the corporate alternative minimum tax are good news. But many law firms are pass-through entities, so deduction limitations mean they'll see less benefit from the new tax law, says Evan Morgan of CPA and advisory firm Kaufman Rossin PA.

  • Opinion

    Companies Should Avoid The BigLaw Bonus Structure

    Michael Moradzadeh

    Since passage of the Trump tax plan last year, companies have been touting bonuses they’ve handed down to rank-and-file employees. This highlights the trend of employers favoring bonuses over pay raises in the belief that variable, short-term rewards are less risky to the business than permanent increases in labor costs. But law firms have used this strategy for years — and there are dangers, says Michael Moradzadeh of Rimon PC.

  • Chief Innovation Officer — The New Star On Legal Teams

    Mark Williamson

    Over the past few years, forward-thinking law firms have expanded their talent pools to include a chief innovation officer, whose responsibilities include spearheading the implementation of technology. It is a smart move, says ​​​​​​​Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer at Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Opinion

    National Lawyers Need National Licensing For National Courts

    EJ Hurst II

    Just last month, a number of legal groups asked the Northern District of California to strike its rule requiring that, before seeking federal court admission, attorneys first be licensed by the state of California. It is irrational to exclude seasoned federal practitioners from general admission due to state bar approval while allowing raw state lawyers who have never been inside a federal courtroom, says attorney EJ Hurst.

  • Choice-Of-Law Takeaways From Dole Insurance Dispute

    Kevin LaCroix

    The insurance coverage litigation arising from the settlement of the shareholder claims filed in connection with Dole Food’s 2013 going-private transaction continues to grind on, and the latest ruling could be helpful for companies seeking to argue that Delaware law should govern the interpretation of their insurance policies, says Kevin LaCroix of RT ProExec.