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Business of Law

  • November 13, 2018

    Top Securities Atty Ditches Tesla In The Wake Of SEC Deals

    One of Tesla Inc.'s top securities lawyers has left the Silicon Valley-based electric car maker, less than two months after Tesla and its CEO Elon Musk agreed to pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission $20 million apiece to resolve securities fraud claims.

  • November 13, 2018

    2 Sentenced For Crimes Including Attempted Murder Of Judge

    Two men have received separate sentences of 25 and 17½ years in prison for their roles in a series of crimes that began with wire fraud and culminated in the November 2015 attempted murder of a judge in Texas overseeing their case, the U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    Law Students Urged To Shun Kirkland Over Arbitration Pacts

    More than two dozen Harvard Law School students are asking their peers to boycott Kirkland & Ellis LLP over the international law firm’s use of mandatory arbitration agreements, and on Tuesday the group promised to expand the movement to other firms and law schools in the near future.

  • November 13, 2018

    Justice Kennedy Warns Of 'Vulgar' Culture Embracing 'Trash'

    Justice Anthony Kennedy may have stepped down from the U.S. Supreme Court, but he is still issuing strong opinions. The retired jurist said over the weekend that "this culture is becoming vulgar" and that the First Amendment doesn't mean people should watch or read "trash." 

  • November 13, 2018

    Law Departments Are Keeping More Legal Spending In-House

    Law department leaders are using more of their budget on internal legal services than on outside counsel, in addition to building up their in-house capabilities and improving efficiencies, according to a recent survey of general counsel and chief legal officers.

  • November 13, 2018

    Buchalter Opens San Diego Office With Employment Team

    Southern California-based Buchalter PC opened the doors on its new San Diego office, the firm's sixth office in its home state and eighth overall, which will at first consist mainly of a new labor and employment team, the firm announced on Monday.

  • November 13, 2018

    No Bridgegate Role, 3rd Circ. Pick Says Of Work For Christie

    Lowenstein Sandler LLP partner Paul Matey, President Donald Trump’s choice for a Third Circuit vacancy, faced a grilling from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday over his time serving as an attorney for former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

  • November 13, 2018

    JetBlue Upgrades Atty To General Counsel Seat

    JetBlue Airways Corp. has appointed an in-house attorney as its next general counsel and corporate secretary, the company announced Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    Trump Picks Regulatory Czar For Kavanaugh's DC Circ. Seat

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday named the chief of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs for the D.C. Circuit post vacated by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, setting off a nomination fight for what's viewed as the nation's second-highest appeals court.

  • November 13, 2018

    Jones Day Hires Firm-Record 11 Former Supreme Court Clerks

    Jones Day has hired 11 former U.S. Supreme Court clerks as associates to its appellate practice group, the firm announced Tuesday, the largest class of high court clerks in the firm’s history.

  • November 9, 2018

    GCs Predict Spending Spike For Firms In Cybersecurity, M&A

    Continuing a steady uptick in outside counsel spending, top legal decision makers are projected to spend billions more on law firms next year, with areas like cybersecurity and data privacy and mergers and acquisitions expected to see big gains, according to a report released Monday.

  • November 9, 2018

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • November 9, 2018

    Calif. Gov-Elect Picks Boies Partner As His Chief Of Staff

    California Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom has named a Boies Schiller Flexner LLP partner, a former adviser for Hillary Clinton, to be his chief of staff.

  • November 9, 2018

    Law360's Pro Say: Sessions Adjourned

    President Donald Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions the day after the midterm elections, replacing him with a loyalist named Matthew Whitaker. At the end of a wild week, we're talking about Sessions' firing, about Whitaker's controversial appointment, and about what it all means for Robert Mueller.

  • November 9, 2018

    Atty Confessed To NJ Killing In Suitcase Note, Docs Say

    A New York City attorney accused of fatally shooting the mother of his daughter in their New Jersey home last month allegedly confessed in a note left in a suitcase when he dropped off the child with his brother before fleeing to Cuba, according to prosecutors and court documents.

  • November 9, 2018

    Newly Blue Texas Appeals Courts Could Benefit Plaintiffs

    The election of more than two dozen Democratic judges to Texas' Republican-dominated intermediate courts of appeal in the midterm elections could mean litigants will see more deference to trial court judgments and more consumer-friendly rulings, experts say.

  • November 9, 2018

    Gibson Dunn Launches Gaming Practice After High Court Win

    Months after securing a U.S. Supreme Court decision that felled a major barrier to sports betting, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP said Thursday it was launching an international betting and gaming practice.

  • November 9, 2018

    15 Minutes With American Express' Chief Legal Officer

    An All-American in track and field, Laureen Seeger says the competitiveness from the sport has been beneficial to her career. Here, the top lawyer at American Express Co. explains what she’s doing to level the playing field in the legal industry, and at what point she thinks it will be clear the profession has reached the finish line on improving diversity and inclusion.

  • November 9, 2018

    Hogan Lovells Suspends Partner For Watching Porn At Work

    A partner in Hogan Lovells’ London office has been suspended for watching adult videos at work, the firm confirmed Friday, adding that it will be tightening its policies for what employees can view online.

  • November 9, 2018

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    General counsel from Uber, PayPal and dozens of other companies backed the California Bar Association's proposed pro bono changes, Google announced it plans to end forced arbitration for sexual harassment and assault claims, and a new report found that law departments of all sizes are currently handling a majority of their legal needs in-house. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: The Equality Lessons

    Margo Schlanger

    In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court, and I began my two-year clerkship with her. In her first opinion as a justice, and in dozens since, Justice Ginsburg reminded us how the law needs to operate if equality is to be a reality, says Margo Schlanger, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Opinion

    Kavanaugh Is The Wrong Choice To Check Autocratic Power

    David Driesen

    In light of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on the Trump administration's travel ban, the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the high court could further jeopardize our democracy. Kavanaugh’s deference to executive authority may embolden a president inclined to use national security rationales to restrict freedom, says David Driesen, a professor at Syracuse University College of Law.

  • NY Commercial Division Backs Technology-Assisted Review

    Elizabeth Sacksteder

    Neither the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure nor most state procedure codes expressly address whether, in what circumstances, or how a party may use technology-assisted review to fulfill its disclosure obligations. A new rule introduced last week by the Commercial Division of the New York Supreme Court aims to fill that gap, say Elizabeth Sacksteder and Ross Gotler of Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP.

  • The Future Of Authenticating Audio And Video Evidence

    Jonathan Mraunac

    The recent emergence of artificial intelligence-based technology has prompted serious concerns about the future integrity of recordings. Attorneys must think critically about standards for authenticating audio and video evidence as well as legislative and regulatory safeguards to discourage pervasive manipulation and forgery, says Jonathan Mraunac of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • Time For Sunshine On 3rd-Party Litigation Funding

    Mary Novacheck

    On July 1, Wisconsin became the first state to require disclosure of third-party litigation financing contingent on the outcome of cases. Individual states' and courts' efforts to shed more light on such funding arrangements are an inconsistent patchwork. The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure should be revised to require such disclosure nationwide, says Mary Novacheck of Bowman and Brooke LLP.

  • Opinion

    Broken Norms Should End Business-As-Usual Nominations

    Neera Tanden

    As we saw with the outcry over Yale Law School's statement about U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, too many in the liberal legal profession still cling to an old view of the rules and norms. Their reputations are now being weaponized on behalf of a judge who has questioned a president's accountability to legal constraints, says Neera Tanden, president and CEO of the Center for American Progress.

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.