Business of Law

  • July 16, 2009

    Bill To Restrict Protective Orders Comes Under Fire

    Many companies and defense lawyers worry that a legislative proposal to change the way protective orders are entered in civil lawsuits will unnecessarily burden an already burdensome process, but proponents say it's necessary to inform the public about health and safety risks that they claim are being hidden in the courts.

  • July 16, 2009

    Husch Blackwell Cuts 10 In Latest Round of Layoffs

    Months after letting go of 17 attorneys and 45 staff members, the Midwestern firm of Husch Blackwell Sanders LLP has laid off an additional 10 attorneys, the firm confirmed Thursday.

  • July 15, 2009

    Calif. E-Discovery Rules Welcomed, With Questions

    California's new e-discovery regulations should provide some needed guidance on handling electronic data in the nation's largest state court system, although exactly how the new rules will play out in a practical sense remains to be seen, experts said.

  • July 14, 2009

    Law Firm Appeals Work Product Discovery Ruling

    Citing attorney-client privilege, Adams & Reese LLP has appealed a court order compelling the firm to turn over documentation of communications between its attorneys and in-house counsel discussing potential client conflicts in a bankruptcy case.

  • July 14, 2009

    Morgan Lewis Nixes 2010 Summer Program

    Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP has become the first Philadelphia law firm to cancel its 2010 summer program, citing the dire economic conditions that have rattled the legal industry.

  • July 15, 2009

    NJ On The Lookout For Volunteer Lawyers

    The understaffed New Jersey attorney general's office doesn't have the funds right now to actually pay new lawyers, but it has begun looking around to see if any will work for free.

  • July 13, 2009

    Addleshaw Goddard Unveils Flexible Work Plan

    U.K. powerhouse Addleshaw Goddard LLP is trying out a new flexible working scheme that will have some fee-earners logging a four-day week in exchange for 85 percent of their regular pay, as firms continue to look for creative solutions to the economic crisis.

  • July 13, 2009

    Dreier Gets 20 Years Behind Bars

    Tarnished lawyer Marc Dreier has been ordered to serve 20 years behind bars for carrying out a $400 million fraud that left a trail of victims including investors and Dreier's now-defunct New York law firm in its wake.

  • July 14, 2009

    Sotomayor's Business Law Views Examined At Hearing

    On the second day of her U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the U.S. Senate, Judge Sonia Sotomayor brushed aside comments that her record as a judge is “pro-business” and discussed her views on antitrust law, the New Haven firefighters case, and environmental regulations.

  • July 13, 2009

    Sens. Praise, Rebuke Sotomayor On Day 1 Of Hearing

    Judge Sonia Sotomayor pledged “fidelity to the law” as a U.S. Supreme Court justice, on the first day of her confirmation hearing in the U.S. Senate, a five-hour session marked by repeated references by lawmakers to her “wise Latina woman” remark, the ejection of several anti-abortion protesters and not a single question directed to the nominee.

  • July 9, 2009

    7th Circ. Revives Wis. Automatic Bar Admission Spat

    A twice-dismissed class action seeking to invalidate a Wisconsin statute allowing graduates of the two in-state law schools automatic bar admission received another reprieve from a federal appeals court Thursday.

  • July 9, 2009

    Ex-Thelen Partners' New Firms Sued Under WARN

    Former employees of Thelen LLP have accused the big-league firms to which its partners defected of violating the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, contending those firms became their new employers for WARN purposes once they snatched up bits of Thelen.

  • July 9, 2009

    Obama Picks State Judge, Atty For District Courts

    President Barack Obama has announced two picks for federal judgeships, nominating Irene Berger, a circuit court judge, to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of West Virginia and attorney Roberto A. Lange to the U.S. District Court for the District of South Dakota.

  • July 8, 2009

    DLA Piper, Baker & McKenzie Cut More Lawyers, Staff

    DLA Piper and Baker & McKenzie LLP, which have both already had layoffs this year, have confirmed new rounds of job cuts.

  • July 8, 2009

    Ill. High Court Adopts New Attorney Ethics Rules

    The Illinois Supreme Court has adopted new attorney ethics standards that require heightened responsibilities for lawyers who learn of wrongful corporate conduct, among numerous other things.

  • July 8, 2009

    Law Firms Hold Off On Tie-Ups In Q2 Of 2009

    Feeling the squeeze from the recession and credit crisis, U.S. law firms are having second thoughts about merging with one another, according to a recent analysis.

  • July 7, 2009

    Ex-Thelen Staff Hits Partners With $18M WARN Suit

    Former workers at now-defunct Thelen LLP have filed a putative class action against the firm's ex-partners and their new firms, including Howrey LLP and Nixon Peabody LLP, alleging fraudulent transfer of funds and demanding $18 million.

  • July 7, 2009

    Weil Gotshal Trims Pay For New Lawyers In London

    Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP has reportedly dropped starting salaries for newly qualified lawyers in its London office from £90,000 ($145,200) to £85,000 ($137,100), following in the footsteps of a number of firms that have experimented with salary reductions to quell recession woes.

  • July 7, 2009

    Social Networks Could Create E-Discovery Headaches

    With many companies beginning to embrace social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter as ways to hype their products, communicate with customers and share information among employees, a great deal of information that could one day be an important part of a lawsuit is floating around the Web in new and unfamiliar forms. Conducting e-discovery on data posted to a social network will present an array of challenges, experts said.

  • July 8, 2009

    Cadwalader Offers 34 Attys Yearlong Sabbatical

    Facing slowed activity in its capital markets and real estate finance groups, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP has asked 34 lawyers to take a one-year sabbatical at one-third of their normal pay.