Business of Law

  • September 18, 2020

    Law360's The Term: We're Back With Season 2

    Law360's weekly U.S. Supreme Court news podcast The Term is back with Season 2 starting on Sept. 24, so join us if you're looking for a show that helps cut through a busy Supreme Court docket with a weekly 15-minute breakdown of all the key cases and developments.

  • September 18, 2020

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    Leading attorneys at Google, AIG and other major companies are teaming up as part of a new diversity initiative to share best practices on hiring and retaining diverse employees, and Law360 looks at the areas of workplace law that could soon become litigation hotbeds. These are some of the stories in corporate legal news you may have missed in the past week.​

  • September 17, 2020

    US Federal Courts Hit With Nationwide Phone Outage

    Federal courts across the U.S. were hit Thursday with an unidentified glitch that took out part of the judiciary's phone system as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic continues to deepen reliance on telecommunications for a large volume of legal business.

  • September 17, 2020

    Littler Reinstates Pre-Pandemic Pay For Full-Time Attys, Staff

    Littler Mendelson PC is rolling back salary reductions for full-time lawyers and staff who are able to work remotely, the labor firm confirmed Thursday, joining a growing list of BigLaw firms to cut back on austerity measures enacted in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

  • September 17, 2020

    Sens. Advance Judicial Picks For Florida, Ohio, Kansas

    The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced nominees for trial courts in Florida and Ohio with bipartisan votes Thursday, while casting party-line tallies for a divisive Kansas pick and another Ohio selection who sparked skepticism on both sides of the aisle.

  • September 17, 2020

    Senate Confirms 2 Ill. Judges — 1 Over Rare GOP Opposition

    The U.S. Senate confirmed two district judges for Illinois on Thursday despite a rare instance of majority Republican opposition for one nominee, a state judge who ordered video released in a high-profile police shooting.

  • September 17, 2020

    GCs Team Up With Ethics Co. On Latest Diversity Initiative

    Top attorneys at Uber and AIG and other executives at major corporations are linking up with ethics and compliance company Ethisphere on a new Equity and Social Justice Initiative to identify and share best practices on hiring and retaining diverse employees, the latest in a string of efforts by general counsels to boost diversity. 

  • September 17, 2020

    Telephone Arguments Are 'Less Fun,' Justice Breyer Reports

    Telephone arguments might be the only way the U.S. Supreme Court can conduct its work safely in the midst of a deadly pandemic, but there is at least one major drawback: "It's less fun," reported Justice Stephen Breyer, who is known as the most talkative member of the court in normal times.

  • September 17, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Some of the nation's biggest banks want out of a lawsuit claiming they owe filing fees under the federal Paycheck Protection Program, a federal judge has struck down emergency restrictions put in place by Pennsylvania's governor, and LA Fitness and Ticketmaster are among the latest to escape some claims that they owe refunds over coronavirus-related cancellations. 

  • September 17, 2020

    Hueston Hennigan Joins Pandemic Bonus Bandwagon

    Litigation boutique Hueston Hennigan LLP will join a small, but growing list of law firms handing out bonuses to associates this fall in addition to their usual year-end bonuses, but in a departure from other firms it also plans to extend extra cash to staff, a source at the firm confirmed Thursday.

  • September 17, 2020

    Ethics Pitfalls Can Await Attys Who Don't Prep For Retirement

    The case of a New York attorney who recently told a court he kept practicing law after giving up his law license because he was "emotionally unable" to abandon his career highlights the need for lawyers to prepare for life after a legal career.

  • September 17, 2020

    Pot Co.'s Ex-GC Says He Was Fired Over Age, Whistleblowing

    The former general counsel and director of finance for a Rhode Island medical marijuana dispensary claims he was discriminated against for his age and forced out of the company after he blew the whistle on an executive's alleged self-dealing, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday.

  • September 17, 2020

    Mass. Courts Hope To Resume Jury Trials In October

    Jury trials in Massachusetts state courts could resume as early as next month after being shut down due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to an updated order from the state's Supreme Judicial Court on Thursday.

  • September 16, 2020

    Milbank Associates Get Bonuses For Work During Pandemic

    Milbank LLP is offering special bonus payments to many of its associates for their work during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a Wednesday email to the associates from firm Chair Scott A. Edelman obtained by Law360.

  • September 16, 2020

    Nixon Peabody Accused Of 'Punishing' Attys For Move To DLA

    Five former Nixon Peabody LLP partners say the firm is "punishing" them for leaving for DLA Piper last year by trying to claw back hundreds of thousands of dollars in earned bonuses and also by withholding wages, earned equity distributions and capital account funds, according to a petition lodged in New York state court Tuesday.

  • September 16, 2020

    Jenner & Block Elevates Five Women Practice Leaders

    Jenner & Block LLP announced Wednesday that it has appointed five women partners to leadership roles in four of the firm's practice groups encompassing investigations, sports and gaming, consumer law, and state regulation work.

  • September 16, 2020

    Fox News Personality Aims To Fight Sex Assault Suit In NJ

    Fox News commentator Andrew Napolitano wants to "vindicate his good name" in a Garden State federal court after being accused of sexually assaulting a criminal defendant in 1988 when he was a judge, saying the accuser tried to extort him with allegations that are "pure fiction" and improperly filed the claims in New York.

  • September 16, 2020

    Senate Confirms District Judges For Calif., Ill.

    The U.S. Senate easily confirmed a California judicial pick Wednesday before nearly party-line votes to approve two Illinois nominees who have previously opposed abortion.

  • September 16, 2020

    Will Pure Lockstep Partner Pay Survive The Decade?

    Generational differences and fundamental changes in the legal industry are driving an increasing number of law firms that pay partners based on seniority alone to reexamine their compensation systems, begging the question, will strict lockstep soon be a thing of the past? Some say it may survive, but in a greatly modified way.

  • September 16, 2020

    Quarles & Brady To Restructure Leadership, Add President

    Quarles & Brady LLP said Wednesday that it will restructure its top leadership come October, when the firm's chair will pass certain responsibilities to the managing partner and a commercial litigation partner will take on the newly created role of president.

  • September 16, 2020

    BigLaw's March Into Texas Continues Despite COVID-19

    Despite the coronavirus pandemic putting a damper on law firms' growth across the country, Texas' legal market has remained vibrant, with several BigLaw firms recently launching new offices in the state's economic hubs.

  • September 16, 2020

    Wary Law Schools Give Remote Learning The Old College Try

    Students and professors are doing their best to adjust to a new and, they hope, temporary normal, but say there are significant challenges to delivering a quality legal education from afar.

  • September 16, 2020

    Law Firm Leaders: Obermayer's Mathieu Shapiro

    Mathieu Shapiro has served as the managing partner of Philadelphia-based Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP since 2016. Shapiro spoke with Law360 about how the 116-year-old firm is modernizing and reshaping itself amid the coronavirus pandemic and broader changes happening in the legal industry.

  • September 16, 2020

    Kirkland Alum Among 2 Prosecutors Tapped For Tenn. Bench

    President Donald Trump on Wednesday picked two federal prosecutors to become judges in the Eastern District of Tennessee, including a relatively young Kirkland & Ellis LLP alum who has helped shepherd Trump's previous judicial nominees to confirmation.

  • September 16, 2020

    Eckert Seamans Sued Over 'Needless' $2.8M Discovery Bill

    Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC racked up $2.8 million in "needless" discovery charges while steering an immigration services company through breach of contract claims and several government investigations, according to a complaint filed in Virginia federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • How To Write A Better Comment Letter On Agency Proposals

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    As the federal government prepares to unveil a revamped online portal for submitting comments on proposed rulemakings, several considerations can help the public provide better feedback to help agencies implement legislation and regulate our activities, say Matt Kulkin and Josh Oppenheimer at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Series

    AGs In A Pandemic: Healey Talks Mass. Worker Safety

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    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey explains how her office is responding to workplace safety concerns and ensuring businesses are following health directives during the pandemic, despite such enforcement being outside her office's traditional portfolio.

  • The Problem With Collectability In Legal Malpractice Cases

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    Attorneys are routinely immunized from malpractice actions when they represent plaintiffs pursuing claims that are not collectable, but an Illinois federal court's recent refusal to protect defense counsel in Newman v. Crane Heyman highlights inconsistency in collectability requirements, says Timothy Parilla at Palmersheim & Mathew.

  • Series

    BigLaw Needs More Underrepresented Attorneys As Leaders

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    Hiring more women, people of color and members of the LGBTQ community to BigLaw positions of power is the first key to making other underrepresented attorneys believe they have an opportunity for a path to leadership, says Ernest Greer, co-president at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Series

    BigLaw Cannot Reap Diversity Rewards Without Inclusion

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    BigLaw firms often focus on increasing their diversity numbers, but without much attention to equity and inclusion, minority lawyers face substantial barriers after they get their foot in the door, says Patricia Brown Holmes, managing partner at Riley Safer.

  • Series

    Advancing Racial Justice In The Legal Industry And Beyond

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    In addition to building and nurturing a diverse talent pipeline, law firms should collaborate with general counsel, academics and others to focus on injustices within the broader legal system, says Jonathan Harmon, chairman at McGuireWoods.

  • Series

    How Law Firms Can Hire And Retain More Black Attorneys

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    The pipeline of Black lawyers is limited, so BigLaw firms must invest in Black high school students, ensure Black attorneys receive origination credit and take other bold steps to increase Black representation in the industry, says Benjamin Wilson, chairman at Beveridge & Diamond.

  • Series

    Ideas For Closing BigLaw's Diversity Gap

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    If enough law firms undertake some universal diversity best practices, such as connecting minority lawyers to key client relationships and establishing accountability for those charged with spearheading progress, the legal industry could look a lot different in the foreseeable future, says Frederick Nance, global managing partner at Squire Patton.

  • Guest Feature

    Diversity Work Doesn't Have To Be Reserved For Partners

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    Serving on my firm's diversity committee as an associate has allowed me to improve access, support and opportunity for minority attorneys at the firm, while building leadership skills and fostering meaningful relationships with firm management and industry professionals, says Camille Bent at BakerHostetler.

  • The Progression Of COVID-19 Force Majeure Litigation

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    Recent cases showcase the force majeure questions that courts are tackling in relation to COVID-19, ranging from ambiguous definitions of key contract terms to landlord arguments against application of force majeure, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • 4 Opportunities For Mediators To Settle Big-Dollar Cases

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    A few specific stages of complicated, multimillion-dollar matters — ranging from prefiling to the beginning of trial — present unique opportunities for mediators to persuade the parties to compromise and lay the foundation for settlement, say Robert Fairbank and Kimberly West at Fairbank ADR.

  • Remote Proceedings Bring New Wrinkles For Court Records

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    Parties and courts using remote videoconferencing should carefully consider how they will preserve a clear record of the proceedings, and the potential impact an official video record may have on appellate review, say Christopher Green and Sara Fish at Fish & Richardson.

  • Cross-Selling Strategies For Law Firms During Pandemic

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    Law firms can grow revenue during the COVID-19 crisis by facilitating communication among complementary practice groups, soliciting client feedback and engaging in other cross-selling activities that build on existing client bases, says consultant David Freeman.

  • Atty Media Interview Lessons From Trump's Axios Appearance

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    The recently broadcast interview of President Donald Trump with Axios political reporter Jonathan Swan provides a dramatic example of how not to answer media questions and presents four lessons to attorneys preparing for press coverage, says Michelle Calcote King at Reputation Ink.

  • Why Remote Depositions Are Likely Here To Stay

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    As attorneys and their clients realize it is possible to conduct video depositions just as smoothly as in-person sessions while eliminating travel, catering and other costs, they will likely demand that remote procedures remain in place even after the pandemic is contained, says Darren Goldman at Becker & Poliakoff.

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