Business of Law

  • June 13, 2019

    Chief Justice Sold AT&T Shares After Ruling In Co.'s Case

    Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. sold at least $100,000 in AT&T stock in November, shortly after a judicial watchdog said he should have recused himself in a case involving the telecom and while AT&T's merger with Time Warner was pending before the D.C. Circuit, according to financial disclosures released Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    IP Boutique Desmarais Expands To West Coast With SF Office

    Intellectual property litigation boutique Desmarais LLP has opened an office in San Francisco's financial district, the firm announced this week, marking its first expansion outside of New York.

  • June 13, 2019

    How Law Firms Can Banish Stale Thinking

    Law firms can look to tactics used in diversity and inclusion training to become places where innovation flourishes, a researcher said at the Legal Marketing Association's P3 conference in Chicago on Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Law360's Weekly Verdict: Legal Lions & Lambs

    Legal lions this week include the team of attorneys that helped secure a $12 million jury verdict in a talcum powder case, while the lambs include a former Pennsylvania magistrate judge sentenced to 6½ years in prison for agreeing to launder $400,000 in purportedly ill-gotten funds. 

  • June 13, 2019

    RD Legal Funding Seeks Exit From NY AG's Usury Suit

    A litigation funder accused of bilking terrorism victims out of their compensation money faced off against the New York attorney general in a Manhattan state courtroom on Thursday, insisting that its agreements were not predatory loans.

  • June 13, 2019

    4 More Trump Judicial Nominees Advance To Full Senate

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted overwhelmingly on Thursday to advance four more of President Donald Trump's judicial nominees to the full Senate for a final confirmation vote, with one prominent Democrat raising concerns about the courts "being stacked" at an unprecedented rate.

  • June 12, 2019

    Boies Schiller Gets OK To Rep 2 'Varsity Blues' Defendants

    A Boston federal court has decided that Boies Schiller Flexner LLP can continue to represent two defendants in the Varsity Blues college admissions cheating case, despite the fact that one parent is cooperating with the government and may be called upon to testify against the other.

  • June 12, 2019

    Flynn Ditches Covington Team For Mueller Conspiracist

    Ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn has hired a lawyer who peddled conspiracy theories about the special counsel's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election to replace Covington & Burling LLP as he faces sentencing on a charge of lying to investigators.

  • June 12, 2019

    Milberg, Convicted Ex-Partner End $15M Reorganization Fight

    Milberg LLP has struck a confidential deal in a $15 million case brought in New York state court by an ex-partner and convicted felon who alleged his former firm reorganized to deprive him of payments he was owed.

  • June 12, 2019

    Senate OKs 5 Trump Trial Court Picks With Bipartisan Support

    The Senate on Wednesday confirmed five of President Donald Trump’s picks for U.S. district court seats, bringing the week's judicial confirmations to nine.

  • June 12, 2019

    Mich. Judge Nominee Withdraws After Conservative Backlash

    Attorney Michael Bogren said Wednesday he had withdrawn his nomination for a federal judgeship in the Western District of Michigan after what he called “gross mischaracterizations” of his past legal work by social conservatives.

  • June 12, 2019

    Ex-Avenatti Partner Threatens Suit Of Other Attys Over $10M

    A former partner of Michael Avenatti pressing for payment on a $10 million judgment raised a threat Tuesday that other lawyers who have accepted fees from the embattled Avenatti could be sued for fraudulent transfers.

  • June 12, 2019

    Judges See Duty To Push Back Against Independence Threats

    Almost nine out of 10 judges said in a recent survey that jurists should speak out against threats to the independence to the judiciary, citing, among other factors, their mandate under the Model Code of Judicial Conduct to improve the administration of justice.

  • June 12, 2019

    Law Firm Leaders: Nicolaides' Richard Nicolaides

    Richard Nicolaides, founder and managing partner of insurance boutique Nicolaides Fink Thorpe Michaelides Sullivan LLP, speaks to Law360 about the challenges of starting a new firm and the value of staying independent and specialized.

  • June 12, 2019

    Rent-A-Center Atty Takes Over As GC Resigns

    Rent-A-Center has tapped one of its in-house attorneys to serve as interim general counsel amid the resignation of its most recent top lawyer, according to a Tuesday filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • June 11, 2019

    Shook Hardy Opens New Atlanta Office With Ex-Alston Attys

    Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP is opening an Atlanta office and has hired three former Alston & Bird  LLP attorneys with specialties in product liability, toxic torts and commercial disputes to work as partners at the location, the firm has announced.

  • June 11, 2019

    Fees In Ex-LeClair Atty's $1M Gender Bias Award Get Do-Over

    A Virginia federal judge on Tuesday vacated a portion of a $1 million arbitration award against LeClairRyan in favor of an ex-shareholder who alleged systemic gender discrimination at the firm, saying the arbiter erred in calculating attorney fees and costs.

  • June 11, 2019

    Greenberg Traurig Launches Legal Innovation Subsidiary

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has set up a subsidiary that it says will serve as a platform for various legal industry players to collaborate in their efforts to innovate legal services delivery, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • June 11, 2019

    3 Ways Law Firms Can Combat Attorney Burnout

    The World Health Organization recently put a spotlight on workplace burnout by labeling it a "syndrome" that can harm an employee's health, underscoring a problem that can be particularly acute for attorneys who routinely work long hours and face stressful situations. Here, experts look at three best practices for law firms aiming to identify and fight burnout.

  • June 11, 2019

    Greenberg Traurig Can't Snuff Fraud Row Over Gotti Biopic

    Greenberg Traurig LLP must face allegations it committed fraud when representing an investor seeking to finance a film biography of mob boss John Gotti, a New York appellate court ruled Tuesday as it revived the $1.3 million suit.

  • June 11, 2019

    House Authorizes Court Action On Barr, McGahn Subpoenas

    The U.S. House of Representatives voted Tuesday to authorize Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., to hold Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn in civil contempt after the two failed to comply with subpoenas.

  • June 11, 2019

    Boies Schiller Says 2 'Varsity Blues' Clients Is No Conflict

    Boies Schiller Flexner LLP has gone to great lengths to prevent communication between two teams at the firm representing separate defendants in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions cheating case, a Boies Schiller attorney told a Boston federal judge Tuesday at a hearing on potential conflicts of interest.

  • June 11, 2019

    ABA Moves To Pull Accreditation From Thomas Jefferson Law

    The American Bar Association announced that it has decided to withdraw the Thomas Jefferson School of Law's accreditation, citing the San Diego school’s financial situation, admissions decisions and overall quality.

  • June 11, 2019

    Trump Pick For Ohio Federal Court Confirmed

    The Senate overwhelmingly confirmed one of President Donald Trump's picks for the federal trial courts Tuesday, agreeing to a state workers' compensation chief becoming a judge for the Southern District of Ohio.

  • June 11, 2019

    Trump Nominates Miss. District Judge For 5th Circ.

    President Donald Trump announced three new judicial picks Tuesday, including the nomination of a federal judge to the Fifth Circuit.

Expert Analysis

  • Protecting Law Firm Talent At Both Ends

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    By 2030, it is possible that 75 percent of lawyers practicing in the U.S. will be millennials. A broadened focus on retention and advancement of all young lawyers is therefore a logical step forward but it fails to address another major retention issue that law firms should explore, says Susan Smith Blakely of LegalPerspectives LLC.

  • Q&A

    Wendy Olson Talks Twin Falls, Tribes, Private Practice

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    Former U.S. Attorney for the District of Idaho Wendy Olson discusses her decades of experience prosecuting white collar crimes and civil rights violations, her work and challenges as U.S. attorney, and her move to private practice.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Brown Reviews 'Dangerous Leaders'

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    Anthony Thompson’s "Dangerous Leaders: How and Why Lawyers Must Be Taught to Lead" explores the conflict many lawyers face when charged with the responsibility of leadership. The book is an excellent read for all lawyers, says U.S. District Chief Judge Nannette Jolivette Brown of the Eastern District of Louisiana.

  • Breaking The Rules: 3 Ways To 'Lead' A Direct Examination

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    Trial lawyers are frequently taught that they should appear invisible during direct examination — that their job is merely to prompt the witness to start speaking. But the most powerful direct examinations are the ones in which the examiner, not the witness, is controlling the pace, say attorneys with Kobre & Kim LLP.

  • Need Litigation Finance? Don't Skip These 5 Steps

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    The process of applying for litigation financing isn’t difficult, but few do it right the first time. Following five steps in your application process will help make sure litigation funders are convinced of the value of your company's legal claims, says Molly Pease of Curiam Capital LLC.

  • A Holistic Approach To Client Retention

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    In an era when law firms are fighting for business and clients can dictate the terms of the relationship, "value" has become a moving target. Firms that take a proactive approach by using strategies designed to articulate value over time will gain the competitive advantage, says Dan Tacone at Intapp Inc.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Allens Pricing Chief Pier D'Angelo

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    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Pier D'Angelo, chief pricing and practice officer at Allens.

  • Opinion

    The ABA Was Dead Wrong About Model Rule 8.4(g)

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    In the two years since the American Bar Association's controversial anti-discrimination and harassment rule, only one state has adopted it, while numerous state supreme courts, state attorneys general and legal groups have correctly rejected Model Rule 8.4(g) as a threat to lawyers' First Amendment rights, says Bradley Abramson, an attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • Opinion

    The Supreme Court Should Become Boring

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    In the aftermath of Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, the U.S. Supreme Court should decline review of the nation's most polarizing political questions unless and until the questions become time-sensitive, says Alexander Klein, head of the commercial litigation group at Barket Epstein Kearon Aldea & LoTurco LLP.

  • More Automation Means Less Busy Work For Legal Teams

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    Legal departments have been slow to adopt artificial intelligence and automation solutions for the sort of mundane tasks attorneys dread. But such tools can make legal teams more efficient and accurate, allowing members to focus on big-picture challenges and mission-critical strategies, says Rebecca Yoder of Docusign Inc.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: BC's Kent Greenfield Talks Corporate Law

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    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Boston College Law School professor Kent Greenfield reflects on his corporate law theories, his legal battle with the Pentagon over free speech and gay rights, and important constitutional law issues to watch out for.

  • Kavanaugh Cannot Be Compelled To Recuse Himself

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    Whether Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s prior statements may be grounds for disqualification when it comes to judging certain cases is debatable, but there are no specific recusal guidelines for the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices themselves don’t even agree on where to draw the line when it comes to perceived political bias, says Donald Scarinci, a founding partner of Scarinci Hollenbeck LLC.

  • Knowledge Management: An Unsung Hero Of Legal Innovation

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    As technology evolves, law firms are increasingly looking for ways to improve communication, transparency and service for their clients. Firms should put knowledge management at the core of their value proposition to create a competitive advantage, says Rob MacAdam at HighQ.

  • Defamation In Litigation: A Primer On Privileges In NY

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    Under New York law, statements made in court and other litigation-related communications are, in most cases, privileged. But these privileges have limits, and it behooves litigants — particularly those inclined to speak publicly about their cases — to be aware of them, says Jonathan Bloom of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • Opinion

    Skip The New 'Civility Courses' And Think Like A Lawyer

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    As we watch what passes for political discourse in our nation’s capital, it’s understandable that universities are launching programs on how to cope with ideological disputes. But our country needs fewer people who profess to be open-minded and more people who engage in and honor the conclusions of reasoned debates, says Alex Dimitrief of General Electric Co.

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