Business of Law

  • July 22, 2020

    Freshfields Adds More US Firepower With DOJ Antitrust Atty

    Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP is expanding its presence in Washington with the addition of a trial lawyer from the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • July 22, 2020

    Law Firm Leaders: Taft Stettinius' Robert Hicks

    Robert Hicks has been serving as the chairman and managing partner of Midwestern law firm Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP for the past three and a half years. Taft, which was founded over 130 years ago in Cincinnati, has more than 600 lawyers across its 11 offices.

  • July 22, 2020

    FBI Ties Salas Shooting Suspect To California Atty's Death

    The FBI said Wednesday it has evidence tying self-described "anti-feminist" attorney Roy Den Hollander, suspected of gunning down U.S. District Judge Esther Salas' son, to the shooting death of fellow "men's rights" attorney Marc Angelucci in San Bernardino County, California, earlier this month.

  • July 22, 2020

    Law Firms Lean On Marketing Teams Amid Virus' Disruption

    Many attorneys are relying more heavily on their law firms' chief marketing officers and marketing teams as the coronavirus pandemic disrupts the usual ways lawyers generate business, a shift some say creates opportunities for marketing professionals to gain prominence in their organizations.

  • July 22, 2020

    Barclays Taps Exec For New GC As Hoyt Steps Down

    Barclays PLC appointed its corporate secretary as new group general counsel Wednesday to succeed Bob Hoyt, who is stepping down after more than seven years in the role and having helped the lender resolve some of its biggest conduct issues.

  • July 21, 2020

    Black Lawyers Push Back On 'Myth' Of Recruiting Challenges

    Diversifying law schools and disregarding the "myth" that there aren't enough minority attorneys available to hire and promote to top legal positions could help make lasting change for Black attorneys, a panel of lawyers said Tuesday.

  • July 21, 2020

    NY Atty In Sex Bias Suit Accuses Ex-Firm Of Bully Tactics

    A New York lawyer accusing Levi & Korsinsky LLP of sex discrimination told a federal court Tuesday that her former firm's partners "tolerated" her alleged unfaithful behavior in a fee decision two years ago and can't sue her for it now, a move she said amounts to bullying.

  • July 21, 2020

    Ex-MSU Recruiter Slams Bid To DQ His Atty Over Sanctions

    A former Michigan State University football recruiter accusing the school, Jones Day and others of violating his First Amendment rights has urged a Michigan federal court not to disqualify his attorney from the retaliation case, arguing the lawyer was sanctioned but not disciplined in related litigation.

  • July 21, 2020

    Maxwell Wants Feds And Boies Silenced In Sex Abuse Case

    British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, who pled not guilty last week to charges of luring minors for sex with Jeffrey Epstein, asked a New York federal judge Tuesday to stop prosecutors and lawyers for witnesses, including David Boies, from talking to the press about her case.

  • July 21, 2020

    BigLaw Lobbyists Build On The Year's Gains In Q2

    BigLaw lobbyists continued to enjoy an increase in work during the second quarter of 2020, in most cases sustaining or even building on the sharp increase seen in the first three months of the year as the COVID-19 pandemic began developing.

  • July 21, 2020

    NY Courts Urge Federal Judge To Stay Out Of Reopening Plan

    New York's state court administrators told a Manhattan federal court Tuesday not to interfere with the state's recent return to in-person criminal proceedings in New York City and pushed back on public defenders' claims that the move denies vulnerable defendants access to the justice system.

  • July 21, 2020

    NY Chief Judge's Photo Found With Salas Shooting Suspect

    The name and photo of New York Chief Judge Janet DiFiore were among the materials at the scene where attorney Roy Den Hollander was found dead after he allegedly gunned down U.S. District Judge Esther Salas' son and wounded her husband at their New Jersey home, a New York courts representative said Tuesday.

  • July 21, 2020

    11th Circ. Lifts Block On Firms' Fee Claim In Fraud Case

    The Eleventh Circuit has found that a settlement provision blocking third parties from suing a settling party is valid only if the settlement hinges on the inclusion of the provision, ruling that law firms Leon Cosgrove and Mitchell Silberberg can pursue payment from an insurer that settled a coverage dispute with their former client embroiled in a fraud suit.

  • July 21, 2020

    Cos. Say Atty Was Fired For Relocating, Not For Getting Virus

    Two businesses formed from a metals company have denied a former in-house counsel's claim that he was fired for taking time off to recover from the novel coronavirus, saying he was axed for abruptly moving to Europe, not taking sick leave. 

  • July 21, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    New Jersey passed a $9.9 billion bond bill, a handful of states unveiled school reopening guidelines, and New York pledged to send protective equipment to Georgia. Here's a breakdown of some COVID-19-related state measures from the past week.

  • July 21, 2020

    Hinshaw Swings Into New Orleans With Ex-McGlinchey Team

    With an uptick in regulatory and bankruptcy work caused by the coronavirus pandemic, Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP says that it's opening a new office in New Orleans led by five partners the firm scooped up, yet again, from McGlinchey Stafford PLLC.

  • July 21, 2020

    Jones Day Women Say Top-Down Pay Policy Backs Collective

    The former Jones Day lawyers suing the legal powerhouse alleging that it underpaid female associates said the firm's top-down, centralized system for deciding junior attorney salaries backs up their push to make their suit a collective action.

  • July 21, 2020

    GCs' Biggest Concerns For The Rest Of The Year

    General counsel across sectors say they're bracing for uncertainty in the second half of the year as they worry about saving their teams from burnout and helping their own families through this challenging time. Here, top corporate lawyers share their biggest concerns for the remainder of 2020.

  • July 21, 2020

    Nonprofits Slam Flores Atty For 'Coercive' Family Separation

    Nonprofit lawyers are accusing the lead attorney in the long-running class action over detained migrant children of supporting a "coercive family separation process," revealing a division within the immigration bar on how to advocate for detained families during the pandemic.

  • July 21, 2020

    Michael Cohen Says Feds Jailed Him To Stop Trump Book

    Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen on Monday challenged a move by federal authorities to revoke his early release from prison, claiming in Manhattan court filings that it came in retaliation after he asked questions about a demand that he not publish a book about the president while subject to probation.

  • July 20, 2020

    Survey Finds Most Judges Say Systemic Racism Is An Issue

    A National Judicial College poll released Monday found that 65% of the judges who responded believe systemic racism is part of the U.S. criminal justice system, with many leaving comments that suggested the problem was one the judiciary should be paying close attention to.

  • July 20, 2020

    Gun-Toting St. Louis Attys Charged Over Anti-Protest Standoff

    Husband-and-wife attorneys who run a prominent St. Louis personal injury firm were charged with a felony apiece in Missouri state court Monday as prosecutors say they brandished an assault rifle and a handgun while confronting protesters marching outside their home last month.

  • July 20, 2020

    Ex-FAIR Research Director Among 46 New Immigration Judges

    Former immigration judges said Monday that the Trump administration's recent appointments of 46 immigration judges are "a fraud on American justice" and that the appointment of a former leader of an immigration restrictionist organization will make it "impossible for one to receive a fair hearing."

  • July 20, 2020

    For Attys, Flexible Work Arrangements May Be Here To Stay

    When COVID-19 hit the U.S. in March, law firms grappled with office closures and remote-work arrangements to comply with local stay-at-home orders. Four months later, many attorneys seem to have adapted to working from home and may not need to return to the office anytime soon, experts said during a panel discussion Monday.

  • July 20, 2020

    Judge Whose Son Was Gunned Down Made History In NJ

    U.S. District Judge Esther Salas, whose son was killed and husband wounded in a shooting at their New Jersey home Sunday, has had a history-making judicial career marked by some of the most high-profile cases in the Garden State, including a recent suit against Deutsche Bank AG over its ties to millionaire sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: SDNY Bankruptcy Chief Morris

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Cecelia Morris, chief judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York.

  • How Lawyers Can Find Equanimity In Crisis

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    Lawyers navigating the COVID-19 fallout may think they no longer have time for the “soft” aspects of their work — such as being an outlet for clients' stress — but maintaining equanimity and focusing on the human aspects of lawyering are key to weathering the crisis, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Opinion

    Courts Should Look To 3 Bar Exam Alternatives During Crisis

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    While the pandemic delays bar exams, jurisdictions should adopt other ways to license new lawyers, as sticking to the status quo would abdicate our profession’s responsibility to meet the public’s legal needs, say law professors Deborah Jones Merritt, Marsha Griggs and Patricia Salkin.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Carter Ledyard's Alex Malyshev

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from New York-based Alexander Malyshev, a partner at Carter Ledyard.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: BakerHostetler's Charlene McGinty

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Atlanta-based Charlene McGinty, a partner at BakerHostetler focusing on health care law.

  • Are Litigation Funding Documents Protected From Discovery?

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    With law firms and their clients increasingly interested in exploring litigation funding during the current economic crisis, attorneys must be aware of the trends emerging in courts across the country regarding the discoverability of litigation funding materials, say attorneys at Jenner & Block and Longford Capital.

  • How COVID-19 Might Uproot Centuries Of Litigation Traditions

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    Litigation has historically been an in-person activity, but the COVID-19 crisis might bring a long-lasting shift toward adoption of technologies that allow discovery and other litigation activities to proceed in a manner that preserves social distancing, say Elisabeth Ross and Christopher Hennessy at Cozen O’Connor.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Trial Lawyer Tom Ajamie

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Houston-based trial lawyer Thomas Ajamie.

  • Consider Legal Ramifications Before Recording Video Calls

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    Given the ease with which videoconference participants can unwittingly risk civil and criminal liability by unlawfully recording calls, attorneys should be mindful of — and clients may appreciate prospective advice on — state consent laws and the various meeting platforms' consent features, say Daniel Rozansky and Crystal Jonelis at Stubbs Alderton.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: FDA's Stacy Amin

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Washington, D.C.-based Stacy Cline Amin, chief counsel at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • Rethinking The Open Office In Light Of COVID-19

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    Many companies, and even some law firms, adopted open-office designs over the last 20 years without any consideration of disease transmission between employees, and now one questions whether such designs may act as a significant impediment to post-pandemic reopenings, says Steven Moore at Withers.

  • 3 Tips For Deposing Difficult Witnesses Remotely

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    Taking a deposition of an uncooperative witness is one task made immeasurably more difficult during the current pandemic, and certain deposition styles that may be extremely forceful in person may have limited effectiveness over videoconference, says Qian Julie Wang at Robins Kaplan.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Kirkland's Abdus Samad Pardesi

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    With self-isolation and social distancing the new norm during the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Chicago-based Abdus Samad Pardesi, a partner in Kirkland's government and internal investigations practice group.

  • Q&A

    Coping With A Pandemic: Civil Rights Activist Karen Narasaki

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    With distancing and isolation the new norm amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Law360 is sharing reactions from around the business and legal community. Today's perspective comes from Washington, D.C.-based Karen Narasaki, a former U.S. Commission on Civil Rights member now advising organizations on the U.S. Census.

  • Opinion

    New Jersey's Plan For 2020 Law Grads Is Brilliant

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court's much-needed order allowing this year's law school graduates to practice prior to being admitted should be adopted in New York — and developed further even after the pandemic ceases, says attorney Dmitriy Shakhnevich.

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