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Massachusetts

  • October 17, 2018

    Fund Manager Cops To Stealing Millions From Friends, Family

    A 70-year-old man admitted he stole millions from friends and family, among others, by taking money he was supposed to invest on their behalf and using it to travel, buy fancy cars and pay off his son’s mortgage, pleading guilty to a 10-count indictment Wednesday afternoon in Massachusetts federal court.

  • October 17, 2018

    Ex-State Street Exec Promises Precedent-Setting Appeal

    After being sentenced to 18 months in prison, a former State Street Corp. executive who was convicted of stealing millions from international clients asked a Massachusetts federal judge Wednesday for his freedom pending an appeal that he promises will include multiple issues that have not yet been addressed by the First Circuit.

  • October 17, 2018

    Au Pair Agencies Say Feds' Brief Dooms Wage Claims

    Au pair sponsoring agencies gearing up for trial over allegations in a collective action they colluded to set low pay rates told a Colorado federal court Tuesday that a recent U.S. government filing in a related case debunks the former au pairs' central theory that the weekly stipend is illegally low.

  • October 16, 2018

    1st Circ. Revives Putnam Investments ERISA Class Action

    The First Circuit on Monday gave a group of Putnam Investments LLC workers another shot at proving their employer shortchanged them by packing their 401(k) plan with company-owned mutual funds without considering other options, ordering a Massachusetts federal judge to take another look at the allegations at a trial.

  • October 16, 2018

    Cardiac Monitoring Patent Invalid Under Alice, Judge Rules

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday ruled that a CardioNet LLC cardiac monitor patent asserted against rival InfoBionic Inc. is invalid under the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice decision because it claims only the abstract idea of identifying heart arrhythmia by analyzing heartbeats.

  • October 16, 2018

    Investors Sue Keryx Over $1.3B Merger With Akebia

    Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. misled investors about the company's financial future in documents related to its $1.3 billion acquisition by Akebia Therapeutics Inc., shareholders alleged in a proposed securities class action filed in Delaware federal court on Tuesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    1st Circ. Overturns Class Cert. In Allergan Price Fight

    The First Circuit has overturned certification of a class of buyers who purportedly bought Allergan medicines at artificially high prices, saying the suit didn't offer a way to weed out large numbers of purchasers who never suffered any injury.

  • October 16, 2018

    Race-Blind Admissions Harm Students, Harvard Dean Testifies

    Harvard's longtime dean of admissions testified that a study by the university's own expert shows eliminating race from the student application process would result in more Asian-American students being admitted — but would lessen the quality of their education — as testimony continued Tuesday in the closely watched Boston bench trial.

  • October 16, 2018

    Sinovac Investor Can't Halt Share Issue In Board Dispute

    A federal judge declined to impose a stock injunction against Chinese biopharmaceutical firm Sinovac on Monday after a Massachusetts family and its private equity arm had argued the company was unlawfully issuing private placement shares to prevent a takeover of its board on the island of Antigua.

  • October 16, 2018

    The Path To Becoming A Supreme Court Advocate

    A look at the careers of attorneys who have dominated oral advocacy at the U.S. Supreme Court over the last decade shows a similar path for men and women, with a few key differences. Here’s how the top 10 male and female advocates stack up.

  • October 16, 2018

    Convicted State Street Exec Gets Lenient 18 Months

    A former State Street Corp. executive was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison Tuesday for stealing millions from clients by sneaking in undisclosed fees on massive transactions, a more lenient ruling than the five-year sentence prosecutors had requested.

  • October 15, 2018

    Labaton State Street Atty Fee Accord Not Yet A Done Deal

    A proposed settlement between Labaton Sucharow LLP and the special master appointed to investigate alleged improprieties in a $75 million attorneys' fee award in the State Street Corp. swindling case was met with some resistance from the judge presiding over the case and fellow co-counsel during a hearing Monday in a Boston federal courthouse.

  • October 15, 2018

    Gender Disparity At The High Court: How Top Law Firms Measure Up

    For the women at elite law firms, an enduring gender gap among advocates can create a high hurdle for their high court ambitions. Here, Law360 looks at the law firms where women score Supreme Court arguments, and where they don’t.

  • October 15, 2018

    RJ Reynolds Hit With $43M Verdict In Lung Cancer Trial

    A Boston jury has awarded $43.1 million in damages after finding that the blame for a man’s fatal lung cancer lay with R.J. Reynolds but not with rival tobacco company Philip Morris or an auto parts firm accused of selling asbestos-laden brakes.

  • October 15, 2018

    Boston Aides Tell 1st Circ. Gov't Attacking 'Straw Man'

    Two Boston mayoral aides accused of leaning on a concert organizer to secure work for a local union urged the First Circuit on Friday to uphold a decision tossing their case, saying the government is aiming at a "straw man" in its appeal.

  • October 15, 2018

    Ex-NECC Workers Blame Boss In Fraud Case

    ​Attorneys for six former New England Compounding Center employees accused of misleading regulators about the workings of the facility whose tainted drugs caused a deadly meningitis outbreak placed the blame on the workers' boss​ in statements to a Boston federal jury Monday.

  • October 15, 2018

    Mass. Restaurant Owner Gets 1 Year For False Tax Returns

    The owner of a counter-service restaurant in Salem, Massachusetts, was sentenced to a year and a day behind bars in federal court Monday after pleading guilty in July to failing to report almost $1 million in income to avoid paying hundreds of thousands of dollars in taxes.

  • October 15, 2018

    Landmark Harvard Admissions Trial Begins In Boston

    A group of Asian American applicants rejected by Harvard University said the school’s admissions process has a statistically significant “Asian penalty” that benefits other racial groups, while the university insisted its process is fair, thorough and in line with U.S. Supreme Court precedent, as a closely watched bench trial began Monday in Boston.

  • October 12, 2018

    Will The Future Of The Supreme Court Bar Be Female?

    While women have made significant inroads into the elite world of U.S. Supreme Court advocacy, last term the number of women arguing at the court hit a decade low. Was it an off year? Or a sign of progress stalled?

  • October 12, 2018

    Supreme Court Women: A Vet & 1st-Timer Talk Gender Disparity

    In exclusive on-camera interviews with Law360, the most prolific female U.S. Supreme Court advocate of the past decade and a first-timer reflect on the status of women in a field still dominated by men.

Expert Analysis

  • The Year Of The Crypto Investigation

    Daniel Payne

    There has been a flurry of subpoenas and investigations into cryptocurrency trading and initial coin offerings in the first eight months of this year. These investigations, on the rise, are coming from both state and federal regulators, says Daniel Payne of Murphy & McGonigle PC.

  • 'High Availability' — A Key Term In Law Firm IT Strategy

    Jeff Norris

    While most law firm executives and partners may instinctively want to tune out terms like "high availability" and "disaster recovery" — concepts that IT managers usually worry about — there are five reasons you should lean in and wrestle with the vocabulary, say Jeff Norris of Managed Technology Services LLC and Greg Inge of information security consulting firm CQR.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • Ensnarement — A 2nd Bite At The Noninfringement Apple

    Brian D. Coggio

    Ensnarement is a potent defense to a finding of infringement under the doctrine of equivalents, as seen last month when a Massachusetts federal court granted Celltrion’s motion for summary judgment of noninfringement, holding that Janssen’s proposed hypothetical claims ensnared the prior art, say Brian D. Coggio and Ron Vogel of Fish & Richardson PC.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Lower Court Confusion Over Impact Of Trump V. Hawaii

    Steven Gordon

    In Trump v. Hawaii, the U.S. Supreme Court recently upheld President Donald Trump’s so-called travel ban against the contention that it is anti-Muslim and violates the establishment clause. However, it appears that some lower federal courts have not understood the high court's message, says Steven Gordon of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Opinion

    A Right To Carry Everywhere, On A Road To Nowhere

    Robert W. Ludwig

    On July 24, a Ninth Circuit panel applied textualist reasoning in Young v. Hawaii to secure a right for individuals to carry firearms in public. To end the gun epidemic — demonstrated in Chicago recently with 74 people shot in one weekend — it’s past time to turn a spotlight on the root cause: legal carelessness and oversights of text, says Robert W. Ludwig of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.