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Massachusetts

  • October 18, 2018

    Fidelity's Foray Into Bitcoin Likely To Boost Crypto Appeal

    Fidelity Investments’ plans to form a stand-alone company that will enable hedge funds and other professional investors to store and trade cryptocurrencies like bitcoin could potentially pave the way for more institutional investment into the fledgling asset class.

  • October 18, 2018

    Settlement Up To $41M Approved In Aviva Annuity Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge approved a class action settlement Thursday guaranteeing the annuities of 5,000 Aviva PLC customers at a value of up to $41 million, though he raised questions about the lead counsel's request for over $4 million in attorneys' fees.

  • October 18, 2018

    Jury Told Of Seized Drugs, Unsafe Workplace At NECC Trial

    A prosecutor wearing purple protective gloves in Massachusetts federal court on Thursday presented a series of apparently expired drugs seized from the New England Compounding Center in 2012 as the government tried to build its case that the facility's operations were sloppy and unsafe before a deadly meningitis outbreak that killed dozens of people.

  • October 18, 2018

    Admitted Fraudster Faces Arrest After Multiple No-Shows

    A Massachusetts judge said Thursday she had no choice but to issue an arrest warrant for a Florida man who missed his repeatedly rescheduled sentencing hearing on his role in a $1.6 million pump-and-dump scheme after being admitted to the hospital, noting his multiple last-minute no-shows and poor communication with probation.

  • October 17, 2018

    Sen. Warren Demands Toys R Us Pay Worker Severance

    U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren is urging five hedge funds who hold Toys R Us debt to answer questions about their role in the liquidation of the toy retailer and contribute to a fund to provide severance pay for the chain's 30,000 former employees.

  • October 17, 2018

    A High Court Milestone Stirs Hope Of Gender Parity

    After an emotionally fraught confirmation process with sexual misconduct allegations front and center, a new justice joins the Supreme Court bench and brings four female clerks with him. The hires bring gender parity to the court's clerkship ranks for the first time, but will the shift be long-lasting?

  • October 17, 2018

    Mass. MD Says FCA Case Over Surgeries Should Advance

    A former anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital defended her second shot at a False Claims Act suit Tuesday, saying a federal court should hear the case because she has now provided evidence to show the hospital may have overbilled Medicare and Medicaid for time patients spent in surgery without a teaching physician in the room.

  • October 17, 2018

    NFL Says Hernandez's Family Can't Remand Concussion Case

    Counsel for Aaron Hernandez’s daughter and the NFL traded barbs Tuesday over whether her suit — which alleges the league contributed to the debilitating brain damage that led to her father’s violent death by lying about the dangers of concussions for decades — belongs in Pennsylvania federal court or Massachusetts state court.

  • October 17, 2018

    Left-Out CRT Buyers Blast ‘Paltry’ $6M Fee-Share Proposal

    Carving $6 million from a massive attorneys' fees award isn’t enough to overcome the fundamental failure to represent indirect buyers of cathode ray tubes from three states originally excluded from a $576.8 million bundle of antitrust settlements, buyers from the excluded states told a California federal judge Tuesday.

  • October 17, 2018

    Fund Manager Cops To Stealing Millions From Friends, Family

    A 70-year-old man admitted he stole millions from friends and family, among others, by taking money he was supposed to invest on their behalf and using it to travel, buy fancy cars and pay off his son’s mortgage, pleading guilty to a 10-count indictment Wednesday afternoon in Massachusetts federal court.

  • October 17, 2018

    Ex-State Street Exec Promises Precedent-Setting Appeal

    After being sentenced to 18 months in prison, a former State Street Corp. executive who was convicted of stealing millions from international clients asked a Massachusetts federal judge Wednesday for his freedom pending an appeal that he promises will include multiple issues that have not yet been addressed by the First Circuit.

  • October 17, 2018

    Au Pair Agencies Say Feds' Brief Dooms Wage Claims

    Au pair sponsoring agencies gearing up for trial over allegations in a collective action they colluded to set low pay rates told a Colorado federal court Tuesday that a recent U.S. government filing in a related case debunks the former au pairs' central theory that the weekly stipend is illegally low.

  • October 16, 2018

    1st Circ. Revives Putnam Investments ERISA Class Action

    The First Circuit on Monday gave a group of Putnam Investments LLC workers another shot at proving their employer shortchanged them by packing their 401(k) plan with company-owned mutual funds without considering other options, ordering a Massachusetts federal judge to take another look at the allegations at a trial.

  • October 16, 2018

    Cardiac Monitoring Patent Invalid Under Alice, Judge Rules

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Tuesday ruled that a CardioNet LLC cardiac monitor patent asserted against rival InfoBionic Inc. is invalid under the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice decision because it claims only the abstract idea of identifying heart arrhythmia by analyzing heartbeats.

  • October 16, 2018

    Investors Sue Keryx Over $1.3B Merger With Akebia

    Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. misled investors about the company's financial future in documents related to its $1.3 billion acquisition by Akebia Therapeutics Inc., shareholders alleged in a proposed securities class action filed in Delaware federal court on Tuesday.

  • October 16, 2018

    1st Circ. Overturns Class Cert. In Allergan Price Fight

    The First Circuit has overturned certification of a class of buyers who purportedly bought Allergan medicines at artificially high prices, saying the suit didn't offer a way to weed out large numbers of purchasers who never suffered any injury.

  • October 16, 2018

    Race-Blind Admissions Harm Students, Harvard Dean Testifies

    Harvard's longtime dean of admissions testified that a study by the university's own expert shows eliminating race from the student application process would result in more Asian-American students being admitted — but would lessen the quality of their education — as testimony continued Tuesday in the closely watched Boston bench trial.

  • October 16, 2018

    Sinovac Investor Can't Halt Share Issue In Board Dispute

    A federal judge declined to impose a stock injunction against Chinese biopharmaceutical firm Sinovac on Monday after a Massachusetts family and its private equity arm had argued the company was unlawfully issuing private placement shares to prevent a takeover of its board on the island of Antigua.

  • October 16, 2018

    The Path To Becoming A Supreme Court Advocate

    A look at the careers of attorneys who have dominated oral advocacy at the U.S. Supreme Court over the last decade shows a similar path for men and women, with a few key differences. Here’s how the top 10 male and female advocates stack up.

  • October 16, 2018

    Convicted State Street Exec Gets Lenient 18 Months

    A former State Street Corp. executive was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison Tuesday for stealing millions from clients by sneaking in undisclosed fees on massive transactions, a more lenient ruling than the five-year sentence prosecutors had requested.

Expert Analysis

  • How Reckless Judicial Impeachments Threaten Rule Of Law

    Jan van Zyl Smit

    Judicial impeachment fever seems to be spreading through the states, with West Virginia legislators recently voting to remove their state's entire Supreme Court, and lawmakers in Pennsylvania and North Carolina threatening the same. These actions are a serious threat to judicial independence, says Jan van Zyl Smit of the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Fogel Reviews 'Good Judgment'

    Judge Jeremy Fogel

    In this time of partisan conflict over judicial selection, a new book by Canadian jurist Robert J. Sharpe —​ "Good Judgment" — represents a refreshing, deeply thoughtful departure from binary arguments about how and why judges make decisions, says U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel, director of the Federal Judicial Center.

  • 10 Ways To Prevent E-Discovery Woes

    Debbie Reynolds

    E-discovery is not easy, but employing these 10 strategies may help minimize future headaches, say Debbie Reynolds and Daryl Gardner of EimerStahl Discovery Solutions LLC.

  • TM Licensors Beware: Your Product Liability Risks May Vary

    Jordan Lewis

    Trademark licensing has exploded in popularity, with everyone from soft drink companies to Ivanka Trump getting into the game. But licensors who attach their name to products over which they lack manufacturing control take a legal risk, and courts' differing views on licensor liability for defective products create a risk of forum shopping by plaintiffs, says Jordan Lewis of Tucker Ellis LLP.

  • 4 Key Components To New Firm Partnership Agreements

    Russell Shinsky

    A well-drafted partnership agreement protects a law firm's founders, establishes a process for new and outgoing partners, and sets forth guidelines for navigating conflict along the way. Startup firms can begin with something less complex, but there are important elements that every agreement should include, says Russell Shinsky of Anchin Block & Anchin LLP.

  • Opinion

    Open The Federal Courthouses

    David Oscar Markus

    Forget about cameras, reporters in the Manafort trial were not even permitted in the courtroom with their phones, tablets or computers. That meant no live reporting on Twitter and no emails to the newsrooms with updates. In a world focused on information and news as it happens, this is unacceptable, says trial attorney David Oscar Markus.

  • 5 E-Discovery Hurdles For Government Agencies

    Amy Hilbert

    Electronic discovery is a challenging process for even the most experienced law firms and corporations, but the challenges faced by government agencies may be even more daunting, says Amy Hilbert of Casepoint LLC.

  • The Year Of The Crypto Investigation

    Daniel Payne

    There has been a flurry of subpoenas and investigations into cryptocurrency trading and initial coin offerings in the first eight months of this year. These investigations, on the rise, are coming from both state and federal regulators, says Daniel Payne of Murphy & McGonigle PC.

  • 'High Availability' — A Key Term In Law Firm IT Strategy

    Jeff Norris

    While most law firm executives and partners may instinctively want to tune out terms like "high availability" and "disaster recovery" — concepts that IT managers usually worry about — there are five reasons you should lean in and wrestle with the vocabulary, say Jeff Norris of Managed Technology Services LLC and Greg Inge of information security consulting firm CQR.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.