Media & Entertainment

  • March 16, 2018

    ICSID Roundup: The Latest Claims You Need To Know

    It's been a busy few weeks at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes, with new claims in the construction, energy, banking, media and tourism industries filed against the republics of Azerbaijan, Colombia and Turkey, the Kingdom of Morocco, and the State of Kuwait. Here are the latest claims at ICSID you need to know.

  • March 16, 2018

    Disney Deal Gets Autodesk Out Of Animation Patent Suit

    A California federal judge said Thursday that software giant Autodesk Inc. did not infringe designer Joseph Alter’s patent on technology for animating hair and fur by incorporating it into the company’s Maya animation program, finding Alter agreed not to sue Autodesk in a previous settlement with Disney.

  • March 16, 2018

    AT&T-Time Warner Challenge Winds Its Way To Trial

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s challenge to AT&T’s planned purchase of Time Warner heads for a courtroom showdown Monday with opening arguments firing up a day or two in, following a fraught and lively lead-up that last saw the judge scolding the press corps and threatening contempt. Here, an interactive Law360 graphic details the rather peculiar path of this major telecom merger challenge.

  • March 16, 2018

    Maryland House Passes Bill To Put Sports Betting On Ballot

    An overwhelming majority of members of the Maryland House of Delegates on Thursday passed legislation that could let voters weigh in on whether the state should legalize sports betting at its racetracks and casinos.

  • March 16, 2018

    A Chat With Littler Info Chief Durgesh Sharma

    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts at Major Lindsey & Africa interview management from top law firms about navigating an increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Durgesh Sharma, CIO at Littler Mendelson PC.

  • March 16, 2018

    Conn. AG Supports Casino Bill Canceling Deal With Tribes

    Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen on Thursday backed a state house bill that would allow for bids on a new casino, possibly in Bridgeport, while also canceling 2017 legislation authorizing two federally recognized tribes to operate a casino in East Windsor.

  • March 16, 2018

    DOJ, AT&T Set To Spar Over Future Of Media Industry

    The U.S. Department of Justice will step into court Monday for its first trial challenging an almost purely vertical merger in 40 years, alleging that AT&T’s planned, $85 billion purchase of Time Warner will give AT&T too much power over rival distributors.

  • March 15, 2018

    LinkedIn Tells 9th Circ. Startup’s Bots Hurt Competition

    LinkedIn asked a Ninth Circuit panel to nix a judge’s order allowing a startup company to keep using bots to scrape data from public profiles on its website, saying at oral arguments Thursday that the decision undermined the “very values of competition and innovation the district court thought it was protecting.”

  • March 15, 2018

    Spotify Touts 'Transparency' Of Direct Stock Listing

    Music streaming giant Spotify Technology SA on Thursday touted its direct-listing plan as a transparent way of going public that is more democratic than a traditional initial public offering, marking the company’s first public discussion about its rationale for the unconventional strategy.

  • March 15, 2018

    FCC Must Undo AT&T, Verizon Spectrum Sales, Rep. Says

    In a letter Wednesday to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, a California congresswoman accused the agency of unfairly giving AT&T and Verizon a leg up in the development of next-generation mobile service by approving a pair of multimillion-dollar spectrum license buyouts, calling for the commission to undo its actions. 

  • March 15, 2018

    Yelp Can't Shake TCPA Suit Over Calls, Consumer Says

    A consumer leading a proposed class action accusing Yelp Inc. of making unauthorized telemarketing calls blasted the company’s bid to exit the suit Wednesday in California federal court, saying he doesn’t have a business relationship with the company that would exempt it from liability under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • March 15, 2018

    Fair-Use Skirmish Between Cravath, Greenberg Rankles Judge

    The Manhattan federal judge handling a fair-use fight over a photo pulled without permission from Instagram and exhibited in New York City gallery chastised two BigLaw firms Thursday after discovery squabbles erupted hours ahead of a long-planned court conference.

  • March 15, 2018

    US Chamber Backs Facebook In IRS Tax Adjustment Bout

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce filed an amicus brief in California federal court on Wednesday to support social media company Facebook Inc.'s fight against the IRS' decision to block adjustment of its taxes for 2008 and 2010, saying a taxpayer's right to IRS appeals is essential to efficient tax administration.

  • March 15, 2018

    Dish Again Loses Bid To Trim TCPA Class Owed $61M

    Dish Network cannot get reconsideration of its bid to trim a class of thousands of consumers in a Telephone Consumer Protection Act class who are due a $61 million judgment, with a North Carolina federal judge saying Wednesday the challenge to the class members came too late.

  • March 15, 2018

    'Warcraft' Maker Activision Gets PTAB To Kill Gaming Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board ruled that "World of Warcraft" maker Activision Blizzard had proven that a patent on avatars used in computer games is invalid based on prior art in an America Invents Act inter partes review, according to a decision issued Wednesday.

  • March 15, 2018

    EU To Decide Fate Of Apple's Shazam Purchase By Late April

    The European Union’s competition watchdog has set an April 23 deadline for a provisional decision on whether to clear Apple Inc.’s $400 million acquisition of music recognition service Shazam Entertainment Ltd., with a final decision due by June 2.

  • March 15, 2018

    9th Circ. Hears Bid To Revive Stolen IP Suit Against Oculus

    Total Recall Technologies asked a Ninth Circuit panel Thursday to revive fraud and contract claims alleging the founder of Facebook’s Oculus VR stole its 3-D virtual reality headset design, saying a lower court judge erroneously dismissed the suit after one of TRT’s founders signed over rights to the claims.

  • March 15, 2018

    Cable Group Rips Sinclair Station Divestiture Plans As Vague

    Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. still hasn’t presented enough information for the Federal Communications Commission to adequately weigh station divestiture plans driven by its proposed $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media Co., the American Cable Association said in its latest barrage against the merger.

  • March 15, 2018

    Now's The Time To Get Ready For Sports Betting, Attys Say

    An imminent U.S. Supreme Court decision could open the door to sports betting in many states, but companies looking to jump into the space should start preparing and start looking for partnerships with existing casinos now, attorneys say.

  • March 15, 2018

    3 Things To Watch As Net Neutrality Litigation Progresses

    With the announcement last week that the most recent round of net neutrality litigation will be heard in the Ninth Circuit, the contours of the hotly contested internet regulation debate are coming into focus, but much remains unsettled as to the fate of the Obama-era FCC regulations.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emerging Sources Of ESI Will Impact Discovery

    Charles McGee

    Late last year, the Sedona Conference released the third edition of its principles addressing electronic document production, updated to account for innovations like Snapchat and Twitter. It may be necessary for these principles to be updated more often in order to keep pace with technology, says Charles McGee III of Murphy & McGonigle PC.

  • Put The Brakes On Acceleration Bay Litigation Funder Ruling

    David Gallagher

    Last week, the District of Delaware raised eyebrows by ruling that documents provided to a litigation funder and its counsel in connection with their due diligence are categorically not attorney work product. Acceleration Bay v. Activision Blizzard seems to be a case of bad facts making bad law, says David Gallagher, investment manager and legal counsel for Bentham IMF.

  • Why President Ford Belongs On Copyright’s Mount Rushmore

    David Kluft

    Many of the American presidents we traditionally honor on Presidents’ Day contributed to the development of U.S. copyright law. You may not think of Gerald Ford, but he signed into law the Copyright Act of 1976 and his memoirs played an important part in defining the fair use doctrine, says David Kluft of Foley Hoag LLP.

  • A 2017 Roundup Of Calif. Anti-SLAPP Appellate Decisions

    Thomas Burke

    California’s anti-SLAPP statute remains the strongest — and most frequently litigated — statute of its kind in the nation. Last year California’s state and federal appellate courts issued 34 published opinions and more than 169 unpublished opinions interpreting the statute. And the California Supreme Court twice reaffirmed the statute’s broad construction, says Thomas Burke of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP.

  • Considerations For Attorneys Using Artificial Intelligence

    Ben Allgrove

    Artificial intelligence tools can empower attorneys to work more efficiently, deepen and broaden their areas of expertise, and provide increased value to clients, which in turn can improve legal transparency, dispute resolution and access to justice. But there are some common pitfalls already apparent in the legal industry, say Ben Allgrove and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • How Not To Enforce An Arbitration Agreement

    Phillip Kilgore

    The Fourth Circuit's recent opinion in Degidio v. Crazy Horse Saloon and Restaurant serves as a lesson to employers and counsel alike on what not to do when setting up an arbitration program or when attempting to enforce an arbitration agreement, says Phillip Kilgore of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Duncan Reviews 'Justice And Empathy'

    Judge Allyson Duncan

    In "Justice and Empathy: Toward a Constitutional Ideal," the late Yale Law School professor Robert Burt makes a compelling case for the undeniable role of the courts in protecting the vulnerable and oppressed​. But the question of how the judiciary might conform to Burt’s expectations raises practical problems​, says U.S. Circuit Judge Allyson Duncan of the Fourth Circuit. ​

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling May Broaden Common D&O Policy Exclusion

    Kevin LaCroix

    A recurring directors and officers insurance issue is the question of whether or not coverage for a claim is precluded under the relevant policy’s professional services exclusion. The Second Circuit’s recent opinion in a coverage dispute arising out of the Facebook initial public offering could extend the exclusion’s preclusive effect far beyond the intended purpose, says Kevin LaCroix of RT ProExec.

  • The Art Of The Litigation Funding Deal

    Julia Gewolb

    As litigation funding becomes more widespread, greater complexity and variability in funding deals are to be expected. All claimants should consider certain key questions on the economics of single-case funding when considering or comparing funding terms, says Julia Gewolb of Bentham IMF.

  • Smart Contracts Need Smart Corporate Lawyers

    Matthew O’Toole

    Given the operational and security risks involved, and the substantial digital asset values transacted, the rise of distributed ledger technology and smart contracts will create new opportunities and responsibilities for transactional lawyers, say attorneys with Potter Anderson Corroon LLP.