Media & Entertainment

  • December 6, 2017

    Bjarke Ingels Bringing First Pro Sports Stadium To Austin

    Architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group is bringing the first ever professional sports stadium to Austin, Texas, which will be part of a massive 1.3 million-square-foot sports, music, entertainment and retail complex, according to an announcement from BIG on Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Animal Groups Ask 11th Circ. For Redo In Captive Orca Suit

    An Eleventh Circuit panel questioned animal rights groups at length Wednesday on what would be the fate of the Miami Seaquarium's captive orca, Lolita, if it grants their appeal for a new trial in their suit challenging her treatment and they were to prevail.

  • December 6, 2017

    Manafort Asked Why Ghostwriting Didn't Flout Gag Order

    A D.C. federal judge has given indicted former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort until Thursday to show that he did not violate her media gag order by ghostwriting an op-ed about his Ukrainian lobbying work, which prosecutors uncovered last week.

  • December 6, 2017

    7th Circ. Wary Of Reviving Barnes & Noble Breach Action

    At least one judge on a Seventh Circuit panel on Wednesday grappled with the prospect of reviving a proposed class action against Barnes & Noble over its 2012 security breach, wondering whether it’s enough to claim economic damages if the California and Illinois customers who lost money through the hack got it back within three days.

  • December 6, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Xiaomi, Disney, Rogers Communications

    Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi could be valued at up to $100 billion in a 2018 IPO, Disney is nearing a deal to buy assets from 21st Century Fox that in total could be worth more than $60 billion, and Rogers Communications may sell multiple assets, including the MLB’s Toronto Blue Jays.

  • December 6, 2017

    DOJ Says AT&T Misled Court In Bid For February Trial Date

    The U.S. Department of Justice fired back Tuesday at AT&T's request for an expeditious trial challenging its $85.4 billion deal to purchase Time Warner, saying the telecom giant's motion was misleading.

  • December 6, 2017

    Brands Are Turning Trademark Cease-And-Desists Into Ads

    Bud Light used an actor dressed as a medieval town crier last week to ask a Minnesota brewery to stop using the company’s trademarks, becoming the latest brand to transform a cease-and-desist into a marketing stunt.

  • December 6, 2017

    Internet Association Asks FCC To Delay Net Neutrality Vote

    The Internet Association, a trade group representing some of world’s largest online companies including Google and Facebook, urged the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday to delay or vote against a planned rollback of net neutrality protections later this month.

  • December 6, 2017

    New Bill Would Carve Sex Harassment From Arbitration Pacts

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers led by Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. — accompanied by former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson — introduced legislation Wednesday to prevent businesses from enforcing mandatory arbitration agreements in instances where employees allege workplace sexual harassment or gender bias.

  • December 6, 2017

    Tribes Want Burial Grounds Suit Paused For Deal Talks

    The Muscogee Creek Nation told an Alabama federal judge Tuesday that it is in talks with the Poarch Band of Creek Indians to settle a suit accusing the latter of obtaining sacred tribal burial grounds under false pretenses.

  • December 5, 2017

    Terry Crews Sues Agent For Sexual Harassment

    Actor and former NFL linebacker Terry Crews on Tuesday accused Hollywood agent Adam Venit of sexual assault, saying in a California state court suit that the power broker acted like a “rabid dog” at a party and that his agency fosters an environment that keeps predators safe.

  • December 5, 2017

    EU Regulators Demand Action On 'Privacy Shield' Issues

    Europe’s data protection authorities on Tuesday warned that they would move to strike down the trans-Atlantic Privacy Shield data transfer pact if officials don’t act within the next year to address several “significant concerns,” including a lack of clear guidance on consumers' redress rights and insufficient U.S. surveillance guarantees.

  • December 5, 2017

    FBI Nat'l Security Letters Grounded In Constitution: DOJ

    U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urged the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday not to rehear a decision ending a constitutional challenge to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's use of national security letters that bar service providers from telling users about government requests for their data, saying it’s grounded in the U.S. Constitution.

  • December 5, 2017

    Trump Can't Cite Duties To Slip Defamation Suit: Accuser

    Summer Zervos, the former “Apprentice” contestant who sued President Donald Trump for defamation after he said her sexual misconduct claims were lies, sought to swat aside protests that his work was too important for him to be sued by telling a New York state judge on Tuesday that no one was above the law.

  • December 5, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Says PTAB Wrongly Upheld Patent In Netflix Case

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday ruled that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board should have invalidated even more claims of a patent for switching a software session from one network-enabled device to another, in a win for challengers, including Netflix and Hulu.

  • December 5, 2017

    Ex-Brazil Soccer Boss Asked About Bribe Money, Jury Hears

    The former president of the Brazilian soccer federation asked the founder of sports marketing company Traffic Group to check on when he would receive apparent bribe payments related to the sale of marketing rights for certain years of the Copa do Brasil tournament, the Traffic founder testified Tuesday in the ongoing FIFA corruption case in Brooklyn.

  • December 5, 2017

    AT&T Rips DOJ's Proposed Start Date For Time Warner Trial

    AT&T told a D.C. district court Monday that the U.S. Department of Justice's proposed start date for a trial in the challenge of its deal to purchase Time Warner is too far off and that its examples of similar cases miss the mark.

  • December 5, 2017

    Broadway Producers Accuse Casting Cos. Of Cartel

    A trade association for the Broadway theater industry on Tuesday sued several casting companies and the Teamsters union in New York federal court, accusing them of forming a “casting cartel” in order to fix prices for casting services and make collective demands.

  • December 5, 2017

    Wis. Tribe Seeks Quick Win In Gambling Compact Spat

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community on Monday asked a D.C. federal judge to vacate a Bureau of Indian Affairs decision rejecting an amendment to the tribe’s state gambling compact, arguing that the ruling was based largely on the incorrect conclusion that the proposal imposed payment obligations on a rival tribe.

  • December 5, 2017

    Top 4 Groups Lobbying The FCC

    November infused new energy into already-active FCC dockets, bringing another wave of net neutrality filings as the commission scheduled a vote to reverse the Obama-era protections and released a draft of the proposed item. But the most prolific lobbyists also weighed in on such high-profile issues as Lifeline subsidy changes and copper network retirement.

Expert Analysis

  • How IT And Procurement Pros Can Inform Law Firm Budgeting

    Steve Falkin

    As law firms begin preparing for their annual budget review, Steve Falkin and Lee Garbowitz of HBR Consulting discuss why firm leaders should give their internal information technology and procurement teams a seat at the table.

  • Getting Real About Artificial Intelligence At Law Firms

    Mark Williamson

    Artificial intelligence needs to be legally defensible in order to be useful to law firms. There are requirements for making this happen, says Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Copyright Registration Debate May Head To High Court

    Alexander Kaplan

    The U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to reverse a recent Eleventh Circuit decision and settle a disagreement over the copyright registration requirement for lawsuits alleging infringement. While circuit splits are relatively rare in copyright law, this divide is deepening, says Alexander Kaplan of Proskauer Rose LLP.

  • Litigators, Wrangle That Data With Content Analysis

    Lisa Tichy.jpg

    Content analysis offers scientific methods for making sense of large volumes of data generated by the internet. While content analysis is a nascent tool in litigation, its use by expert witnesses may transform the kinds of evidence considered by courts, say Lisa Tichy and Anna Shakotko of Cornerstone Research.

  • Proportionality, Not Perfection, Is What Matters

    John Rosenthal

    A few jurists and commentators have recently caused a stir in the e-discovery community by arguing that litigants should avoid using keyword searches to filter or cull a document population before using predictive coding. This “no-cull” rationale undermines the principle of proportionality at the heart of the recent changes to Federal Rule 26, say John Rosenthal and Jason Moore of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • High Court Gets Ready To Weigh Privacy Vs. Public Safety

    Bob Anderson

    On Nov. 29, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Carpenter v. United States — a case that could dramatically affect the future of surveillance, potentially requiring law enforcement to secure a warrant each time it seeks cell tower data and similar types of metadata, says Bob Anderson, leader of Navigant Consulting Inc.'s information security practice.

  • Make Way For The 'Unicorns'

    Lucy Endel Bassli

    By "unicorn" I don’t mean the next great tech startup with a valuation of $1 billion. I mean the new breed of lawyers realizing that there are better ways to get their day jobs done, says Lucy Endel Bassli, assistant general counsel leading the legal operations and contracting functions at Microsoft Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McConnell Reviews 'Unequal'

    Judge John McConnell

    As widespread claims of sexual misconduct continue to surface in the entertainment industry and beyond, a discussion of how judges treat workplace discrimination cases may be particularly timely. Here, U.S. District Judge John McConnell reviews the book "Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law," by professors Sandra Sperino and Suja Thomas.

  • Weinstein Scandal Highlights Employment Contract Questions

    Lynne Bernabei

    The Weinstein Company recently fired Harvey Weinstein following a report that he harassed and assaulted multiple women over the last three decades. However, beyond the allegations, the reported terms of Weinstein’s contract with the company raise several legal questions, say Lynne Bernabei and Michael Ellement of Bernabei & Kabat PLLC.

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.