Media & Entertainment

  • December 6, 2017

    Hopi Tribe Inks Gaming Compact With State Of Arizona

    Hopi Tribe Chairman Herman G. Honanie on his last day in office signed an agreement with Republican Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey allowing the tribe to operate or lease up to 900 Class III gaming machines, according to the tribe.

  • December 6, 2017

    French Regulator Warns Toymaker To Address Privacy Risks

    France's data protection regulator has become the latest to raise red flags over the potential privacy and security risks of a pair of popular internet-connected toys, warning toymaker Genesis Industries Ltd. that it would likely face sanctions if it didn't improve its security controls and data use notices within two months. 

  • December 6, 2017

    Campus Assault Book Is Protected Opinion: HarperCollins

    HarperCollins Publishers LLC on Wednesday urged an Illinois federal judge to toss a graduate student’s defamation and invasion of privacy suit against the company and the author of a book on campus sexual assault, saying the student can’t lob such allegations against them because the passages about her are the author’s constitutionally protected opinion.

  • December 6, 2017

    Bjarke Ingels Bringing First Pro Sports Stadium To Austin

    Architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group is bringing the first ever professional sports stadium to Austin, Texas, which will be part of a massive 1.3 million-square-foot sports, music, entertainment and retail complex, according to an announcement from BIG on Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Animal Groups Ask 11th Circ. For Redo In Captive Orca Suit

    An Eleventh Circuit panel questioned animal rights groups at length Wednesday on what would be the fate of the Miami Seaquarium's captive orca, Lolita, if it grants their appeal for a new trial in their suit challenging her treatment and they were to prevail.

  • December 6, 2017

    Manafort Asked Why Ghostwriting Didn't Flout Gag Order

    A D.C. federal judge has given indicted former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort until Thursday to show that he did not violate her media gag order by ghostwriting an op-ed about his Ukrainian lobbying work, which prosecutors uncovered last week.

  • December 6, 2017

    7th Circ. Wary Of Reviving Barnes & Noble Breach Action

    At least one judge on a Seventh Circuit panel on Wednesday grappled with the prospect of reviving a proposed class action against Barnes & Noble over its 2012 security breach, wondering whether it’s enough to claim economic damages if the California and Illinois customers who lost money through the hack got it back within three days.

  • December 6, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Xiaomi, Disney, Rogers Communications

    Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi could be valued at up to $100 billion in a 2018 IPO, Disney is nearing a deal to buy assets from 21st Century Fox that in total could be worth more than $60 billion, and Rogers Communications may sell multiple assets, including the MLB’s Toronto Blue Jays.

  • December 6, 2017

    DOJ Says AT&T Misled Court In Bid For February Trial Date

    The U.S. Department of Justice fired back Tuesday at AT&T's request for an expeditious trial challenging its $85.4 billion deal to purchase Time Warner, saying the telecom giant's motion was misleading.

  • December 6, 2017

    Brands Are Turning Trademark Cease-And-Desists Into Ads

    Bud Light used an actor dressed as a medieval town crier last week to ask a Minnesota brewery to stop using the company’s trademarks, becoming the latest brand to transform a cease-and-desist into a marketing stunt.

  • December 6, 2017

    Internet Association Asks FCC To Delay Net Neutrality Vote

    The Internet Association, a trade group representing some of world’s largest online companies including Google and Facebook, urged the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday to delay or vote against a planned rollback of net neutrality protections later this month.

  • December 6, 2017

    New Bill Would Carve Sex Harassment From Arbitration Pacts

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers led by Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. — accompanied by former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson — introduced legislation Wednesday to prevent businesses from enforcing mandatory arbitration agreements in instances where employees allege workplace sexual harassment or gender bias.

  • December 6, 2017

    Tribes Want Burial Grounds Suit Paused For Deal Talks

    The Muscogee Creek Nation told an Alabama federal judge Tuesday that it is in talks with the Poarch Band of Creek Indians to settle a suit accusing the latter of obtaining sacred tribal burial grounds under false pretenses.

  • December 5, 2017

    Terry Crews Sues Agent For Sexual Harassment

    Actor and former NFL linebacker Terry Crews on Tuesday accused Hollywood agent Adam Venit of sexual assault, saying in a California state court suit that the power broker acted like a “rabid dog” at a party and that his agency fosters an environment that keeps predators safe.

  • December 5, 2017

    EU Regulators Demand Action On 'Privacy Shield' Issues

    Europe’s data protection authorities on Tuesday warned that they would move to strike down the trans-Atlantic Privacy Shield data transfer pact if officials don’t act within the next year to address several “significant concerns,” including a lack of clear guidance on consumers' redress rights and insufficient U.S. surveillance guarantees.

  • December 5, 2017

    FBI Nat'l Security Letters Grounded In Constitution: DOJ

    U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions urged the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday not to rehear a decision ending a constitutional challenge to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's use of national security letters that bar service providers from telling users about government requests for their data, saying it’s grounded in the U.S. Constitution.

  • December 5, 2017

    Trump Can't Cite Duties To Slip Defamation Suit: Accuser

    Summer Zervos, the former “Apprentice” contestant who sued President Donald Trump for defamation after he said her sexual misconduct claims were lies, sought to swat aside protests that his work was too important for him to be sued by telling a New York state judge on Tuesday that no one was above the law.

  • December 5, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Says PTAB Wrongly Upheld Patent In Netflix Case

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday ruled that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board should have invalidated even more claims of a patent for switching a software session from one network-enabled device to another, in a win for challengers, including Netflix and Hulu.

  • December 5, 2017

    Ex-Brazil Soccer Boss Asked About Bribe Money, Jury Hears

    The former president of the Brazilian soccer federation asked the founder of sports marketing company Traffic Group to check on when he would receive apparent bribe payments related to the sale of marketing rights for certain years of the Copa do Brasil tournament, the Traffic founder testified Tuesday in the ongoing FIFA corruption case in Brooklyn.

  • December 5, 2017

    AT&T Rips DOJ's Proposed Start Date For Time Warner Trial

    AT&T told a D.C. district court Monday that the U.S. Department of Justice's proposed start date for a trial in the challenge of its deal to purchase Time Warner is too far off and that its examples of similar cases miss the mark.

Expert Analysis

  • Being There: Preparing Witnesses For Depositions

    Alan Hoffman

    Preparing witnesses to be deposed is a critical element of discovery. It is important to remember that each witness is an individual with unique personal qualities, strengths and weaknesses. Getting to know the witness helps establish rapport and trust, says Alan Hoffman of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Pendulum May Be Swinging Away From Fair Use

    Meaghan Kent

    Over the past year or so, courts have begun to temper the fair use defense to copyright infringement. The KinderGuides decision last month from the Southern District of New York is the most recent example of this growing trend, say attorneys with Venable LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Building Sponsorship Relationships

    Michael Scudder

    Within their first year, associates should make it a priority to take on a pro bono matter and approach a partner about supervising the project. By collaborating with a partner on a pro bono case, young associates can cultivate sponsorship relationships while simultaneously contributing to the public good, say Michael Scudder and Jay Mitchell of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • 9th Circ. Addresses Lower Court Split On False Ad Cases

    Cortlin Lannin

    Last week, the Ninth Circuit's decision in Davidson v. Kimberly-Clark answered a question that has long split the district courts in that circuit: whether a plaintiff in federal court who was previously deceived by allegedly false or misleading advertising possesses Article III standing to seek an injunction targeting that advertising, even when she has become aware of the truth about the product, says Cortlin Lannin of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Beyond The Hurdles

    Ann Warren

    There are various barriers to corporate pro bono work, including lack of malpractice insurance coverage, limited resources, and the transactional nature of the majority of in-house legal work. But at the end of the day, we’ve overcome many of these barriers, says Ann Warren, associate general counsel of Duke Energy Corp.

  • The Current Fight Against Contraband Art And Antiquities

    Stephen Juris

    Federal and state authorities’ increased focus on the art and antiquities markets — seen this summer with Hobby Lobby’s much-publicized forfeiture of a large collection of ancient Mesopotamian tablets and cylinder seals — presents significant challenges for both legitimate and less scrupulous dealers and collectors, say Stephen Juris and Brian Remondino of Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLP.

  • Fair Use With Dr. Seuss

    Tal Dickstein

    Because of their unique style and wide appeal, elements of Dr. Seuss’ books have been borrowed by other authors who claim their works are protected parody. A review of these cases, including a decision last month in the Southern District of New York, provides helpful guidance on how the fair use defense applies to parodies, says Tal Dickstein of Loeb & Loeb LLP.

  • A Magical Surprise Hidden In 3rd Circ. Rest Break Opinion

    Ashley Falls

    Last week, the Third Circuit delivered a win for employees with its decision in Secretary U.S. Department of Labor v. American Future Systems, which said the company's rest break policy violated the Fair Labor Standards Act. And, in a fun Friday-the-13th twist, the court managed to cite the "Harry Potter" books while authoring its opinion, says Ashley Falls of Falls Legal.

  • The Law Firm CFO’s Role In The Strategic Planning Process

    Tyler Quinn

    Today's law firm chief financial officer should be involved in many areas beyond traditional financial management, including operations, risk management and information technology. He or she can support strategic planning throughout the process, from development of the plan to its implementation, measurement and eventual evolution, say Tyler Quinn and Marc Feigelson of Kaufman Rossin PA.

  • Navigating The Pitfalls Of Civil Investigative Demands

    Chris Browning

    In U.S. v. Dish Network, currently on appeal to the Tenth Circuit, the district court awarded statutory damages of $280 million in favor of the U.S. and the four plaintiff states. Buried among the thousands of pages of interlocutory orders issued by the district court is a warning that should be heeded by all parties that are the subjects of governmental investigations, say attorneys with Troutman Sanders LLP.