We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Media & Entertainment

  • August 6, 2018

    Comment System Take-Down Not Cyberattack, FCC Confirms

    A drastic spike in public comments brought down the FCC’s online system last summer following a segment about net neutrality on the HBO program “Last Week Tonight,” the Federal Communications Commission’s inspector general has concluded in a report, changing the agency’s original narrative that it had been the target of a cyberattack.

  • August 6, 2018

    Disney, Viacom Push To Dismiss Kid Data Scrape Suit

    Disney, Viacom and other companies asked a California federal court to toss proposed class actions accusing them of surreptitiously gathering kids’ personal information while they play mobile games and selling it to advertisers, saying the parents leading the suits haven’t shown any data was improperly collected or used.

  • August 6, 2018

    Bernstein Litowitz, Robbins Geller Tapped In Facebook Suit

    A California federal judge appointed Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann LLP and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP as co-lead counsel in consolidated class action litigation against Facebook Inc. after its stock dropped following disclosure of its ties to the now-bankrupt political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica.

  • August 6, 2018

    Producer Drops Film Rights Suit Against Weinstein, Disney

    A film producer has settled his claims with Walt Disney and The Weinstein Co. in a dispute over the rights to make a spinoff and sequel to the 1984 cult Hollywood horror film “Children of the Corn,” according to court documents filed in California federal court Monday.

  • August 6, 2018

    Dating Service Users' Fraud Classes Modified, Not Decertified

    Matchmaking service It's Just Lunch International Inc. lost its bid to decertify two consumer classes alleging it defrauded daters, but, to make the classes more cohesive, a New York federal judge on Monday narrowed the scope of the national class and set the end of the class period at May 2014.

  • August 6, 2018

    Media Outlets Want Expedited Appeal In Parkland Video Fight

    Media organizations fighting the Broward County (Florida) School Board and the local state attorney's office over security camera footage taken during the February mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School asked the Florida Supreme Court Monday to expedite the government's appeal of a decision ordering the release of the videos.

  • August 6, 2018

    Shuffle Tech CEO Not A 'Liar-Loser' But A Victim, Jury Told

    Shuffle Tech LLC’s counsel urged a federal jury Monday not to buy into the idea that its CEO is a “loser and a liar” when it comes to his company, saying he is actually a victim and Scientific Games Corp.'s characterization was “just the arrogance of a monopolist and their attorneys.”

  • August 6, 2018

    Judge Got AT&T-Time Warner Case Wrong, DC Circ. Told

    The U.S. Department of Justice told the D.C. Circuit on Monday that a lower court ignored a fundamental economic model and basic corporate principles when it rejected the agency's effort to block AT&T's now-completed $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner.

  • August 6, 2018

    Insurer Says It Has No Duty To Cover Go-Kart Accident

    Cincinnati Insurance Co. says it has no duty to defend a go-kart center from a lawsuit by the parents of a child who was thrown from one of its carts, arguing that exclusions in the policy for amusement rides bar coverage, according to a lawsuit filed in an Iowa federal court on Friday.

  • August 6, 2018

    Trump Admin. Asks High Court To Nix Net Neutrality Ruling

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to gut a D.C. Circuit decision upholding the legitimacy of the Obama-era net neutrality rules now that the Trump administration has reversed those rules.

  • August 6, 2018

    Brewery Wants End To Thelonious Monk IP Lawsuit

    A California craft brewery that sells a "Brother Thelonious" ale is pushing to end a lawsuit filed by the estate of jazz legend Thelonious Monk, saying discovery had proven "the utter falsity" of the case.

  • August 6, 2018

    Amaya Investors Reach $5.8M Settlement Over Stock Drop

    Investors in Amaya Inc. told a New Jersey federal court that they’d reached a $5.75 million settlement with the gambling giant over allegations that the value of Amaya’s stock price took a nosedive after regulators filed insider trading charges against its CEO.

  • August 6, 2018

    Pittsburgh Casino Spied On Texts, Banking Info, Guests Say

    Two women have accused Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh of zooming in on their cell phones with its security cameras to record their private information, then sharing that information with one plaintiff’s ex-husband, according to two lawsuits filed in Allegheny County court.

  • August 6, 2018

    Emerson Can't Undo BladeRoom's $30M Trade Secret Win

    A California federal judge refused to tinker with a jury's $30 million award to data-center manufacturer BladeRoom regarding competitor Emerson's theft of business info that allowed it to win Facebook's business for a data center in Sweden.

  • August 6, 2018

    Journalist Hits CenterPoint With $1M Suit Over Electric Shock

    A British journalist who suffered an electric shock when he came into close proximity to live power lines submerged during Hurricane Harvey filed a $1 million lawsuit against CenterPoint Energy Inc. in state district court in Houston Monday, arguing the power company should have killed the lines in light of the catastrophic flooding.

  • August 6, 2018

    FCC Eyes Later Deadline For Challenging Coverage Maps

    The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission has asked his fellow commissioners to push back the deadline for certain groups to challenge coverage maps that determine which rural and underserved parts of the country are eligible for subsidies to boost mobile broadband.

  • August 6, 2018

    WWE Seeks Attys' Fees After Sanctions In Concussion Suit

    World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. has asked a Connecticut federal judge to order an attorney for two former wrestlers to pay the entertainment company's $176,486 legal bill for attorneys' fees and costs associated with an earlier sanctions order over an evidence dispute in the wrestlers' concussion suit.

  • August 3, 2018

    Gawker Bankruptcy Can't Shield Writer From Defamation Suit

    A Deadspin freelancer who was sued for defamation by a sports gambling expert is not protected by the Chapter 11 plan of Deadspin's former parent company, Gawker Media, a New York bankruptcy judge ruled Friday, because the gambling expert did not receive a benefit from the bankruptcy.

  • August 3, 2018

    BuzzFeed Wins Bid For Gov't Testimony On Trump Dossier

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday granted BuzzFeed's bid to compel certain testimony from federal government agencies and employees in its suit over an unverified dossier containing scandalous claims about information that Russia was said to be collecting to blackmail President Donald Trump.

  • August 3, 2018

    Future Of Internet Sports Betting Clouded By Wire Act

    Just months after the U.S. Supreme Court opened the door to legal sports betting, gaming companies in a handful of states are already taking wagers on games. But experts say a federal law — the Wire Act — is a major roadblock for betting operators looking to expand their offerings to mobile and online betting.

Expert Analysis

  • Limiting Law Firms' Professional Liability Risks: Part 3

    Stuart Pattison

    As clients increasingly look to limit their own liability exposure, they can reasonably expect that their retained counsel should do the same. In this context, a carefully crafted, thoughtfully presented engagement letter can help a law firm strike a successful balance between protecting itself and preserving a client relationship, say Stuart Pattison and John Muller of Sompo International Holdings Ltd.

  • New Stats On Millennial Attorney Disciplinary Actions

    Jean Edwards

    In this analysis of disciplinary action trends in the legal industry, Edwards Neils LLC managing member Jean Edwards examines data provided by bar organizations for 17 states and the District of Columbia.

  • Limiting Law Firms' Professional Liability Risks: Part 2

    Stuart Pattison

    With law firms increasingly exposed to professional liability risks associated with their corporate client relationships, firms must craft well-structured client engagement letters to help protect against malpractice claims. Two key elements of an engagement letter are how it defines the scope of engagement and how it handles conflicts of interest, say Stuart Pattison and John Muller of Sompo International Holdings Ltd.

  • Series

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer: Prioritizing Is Always Key

    Joe Lieberman

    Today, members of Congress often seem able to blame colleagues of the other party for not getting anything done for their constituents. In law practice, you can’t really blame a bad result for your clients on the lawyers on the other side, says former Sen. Joe Lieberman, D-Conn., of Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP.

  • Classifying $10B Of Auctioned Airwaves For Tax Purposes

    R. Gregory Roberts

    Television broadcasters who participated in the 2017 Federal Communications Commission spectrum auction should carefully consider how the auction proceeds should be treated for state tax apportionment purposes, say attorneys at Reed Smith LLP.

  • Limiting Law Firms' Professional Liability Risks: Part 1

    Stuart Pattison

    Corporate law departments are increasingly demanding more concessions from outside legal counsel, and presenting engagement letters that open the door to greater professional and cyber liability exposure for law firms — often beyond the scope of their insurance coverage. Firms must add their own language to engagement letters to limit liability, say Stuart Pattison and John Muller of Sompo International Holdings Ltd.

  • Series

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer: How Congress Affected My Career

    Yvonne B. Burke

    Being a former member of Congress put me in an advantageous position when I approached law firms in the late '70s, at a time when there were few female lawyers, and even fewer African-American lawyers, in major law firms, says former Rep. Yvonne B. Burke, D-Calif., a director of Amtrak.

  • Series

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer: DC Isn't As Bad As You Think

    Norm Coleman

    Popular culture paints the Hill as a place teeming with intrigue, corruption and malicious intent. But in Congress I learned important lessons about respecting people and the work they do, says former Sen. Norm Coleman, R-Minn., of Hogan Lovells.

  • Series

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer: 6 Things I Learned In Congress

    Charles Gonzalez

    I found that senior members of Congress didn’t have time to mentor younger members. Lawyers — though just as busy as members of Congress — cannot afford to follow this model, says former Rep. Charles Gonzalez, D-Texas, of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Blockchain Is A Safe Bet For Sports Gambling Decentralization

    John Juricich

    With the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down the federal sports gambling ban, the betting industry is poised for a meteoric rise, and blockchain has the potential to revolutionize sports gambling by cutting the "trusted" third party out of an industry that has been historically opaque and a racket for the house, says John Juricich of Maynard Cooper & Gale PC.