Media & Entertainment

  • December 7, 2017

    Irell Partner To Star As CEO Of Legendary Entertainment

    Irell & Manella LLP announced Wednesday that a transactions partner will become the CEO of one of the firm’s clients, movie studio Legendary Entertainment LLC, the California production company behind international blockbusters “The Dark Knight,” “Jurassic World” and “Man of Steel.”

  • December 7, 2017

    Sinclair-Tribune Merger Could Boost Minority Biz, FCC Hears

    Conservative political commentator Armstrong Williams told the Federal Communications Commissions in an ex parte filing that Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.’s proposed acquisition of Tribune Media Co. would allow minority-owned businesses to gain licensed stations and market share.

  • December 7, 2017

    Cartoon Network Ducks $50M 'Black Jesus' Copyright Suit

    Time Warner Inc. and the Cartoon Network on Wednesday escaped copyright infringement allegations that the channel’s “Black Jesus” show stole its premise from a short story called “Thank You, Jesus,” as a New York federal judge ruled the two Jesuses weren’t very similar and tossed the $50 million suit.

  • December 7, 2017

    Net Neutrality: How We Got Here

    The Federal Communications Commission is on track to scrap its so-called net neutrality rules at its upcoming December meeting, offering another interesting development in the complicated history of internet regulation.

  • December 7, 2017

    The Biggest Native American Law Rulings Of 2017

    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that a Mohegan Tribe limousine driver didn't share the tribe's sovereign immunity to a tort suit caught the attention of Native American law practitioners in 2017, but major decisions also came in on offensive trademarks, water rights in the West and Oklahoma tribal jurisdiction. Here, Law360 reviews some of the highest-profile decisions in Native American law in 2017.

  • December 6, 2017

    Soccer Boss' Computer Hidden After Arrest, Worker Testifies

    An assistant who worked for former CONMEBOL President Juan Angel Napout testified Wednesday that he had followed instructions from a lawyer at the powerful South American soccer confederation to help remove Napout’s computer from his office on the morning after his arrest in December 2015.

  • December 6, 2017

    'Jersey Shore' Star Aims To Delay Trial Over Tax Claims

    Counsel for “Jersey Shore” star Michael “The Situation” Sorrentino urged a New Jersey federal court Wednesday to postpone by a few months the upcoming trial of the reality TV personality and his brother on tax-related charges, citing scheduling conflicts with other trials.

  • December 6, 2017

    Nonprofits Blast FCC For Reinstating UHF Broadcast Discount

    Free Press, Common Cause and other nonprofit organizations fired back against the Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday in a D.C. Circuit appeal over an agency-issued discount that makes it easier for UHF broadcast owners to gain market share, calling the reinstatement of the discount arbitrary and capricious.

  • December 6, 2017

    Tribes Seek Seat At Table In Bridgeport Casino Talks

    Two tribes that own casinos in Connecticut and are seeking to open one together want to be part of any discussions about a possible Bridgeport gaming facility, they told state lawmakers in a letter Tuesday, amid buzz around MGM Resorts International’s plan to seek approval for a $675 million resort casino in the city.

  • December 6, 2017

    Leaders Say Net Neutrality Rollback Contradicts FCC's Role

    A handful of lawmakers and former FCC officials ratcheted up the pressure on the Federal Communications Commission to call off its impending vote on net neutrality, telling reporters on Wednesday that Chairman Ajit Pai’s current plan to undo Obama-era protections could upset the balance of the FCC’s regulatory authority.

  • December 6, 2017

    Hopi Tribe Inks Gaming Compact With State Of Arizona

    Hopi Tribe Chairman Herman G. Honanie on his last day in office signed an agreement with Republican Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey allowing the tribe to operate or lease up to 900 Class III gaming machines, according to the tribe.

  • December 6, 2017

    French Regulator Warns Toymaker To Address Privacy Risks

    France's data protection regulator has become the latest to raise red flags over the potential privacy and security risks of a pair of popular internet-connected toys, warning toymaker Genesis Industries Ltd. that it would likely face sanctions if it didn't improve its security controls and data use notices within two months. 

  • December 6, 2017

    Campus Assault Book Is Protected Opinion: HarperCollins

    HarperCollins Publishers LLC on Wednesday urged an Illinois federal judge to toss a graduate student’s defamation and invasion of privacy suit against the company and the author of a book on campus sexual assault, saying the student can’t lob such allegations against them because the passages about her are the author’s constitutionally protected opinion.

  • December 6, 2017

    Bjarke Ingels Bringing First Pro Sports Stadium To Austin

    Architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group is bringing the first ever professional sports stadium to Austin, Texas, which will be part of a massive 1.3 million-square-foot sports, music, entertainment and retail complex, according to an announcement from BIG on Tuesday.

  • December 6, 2017

    Animal Groups Ask 11th Circ. For Redo In Captive Orca Suit

    An Eleventh Circuit panel questioned animal rights groups at length Wednesday on what would be the fate of the Miami Seaquarium's captive orca, Lolita, if it grants their appeal for a new trial in their suit challenging her treatment and they were to prevail.

  • December 6, 2017

    Manafort Asked Why Ghostwriting Didn't Flout Gag Order

    A D.C. federal judge has given indicted former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort until Thursday to show that he did not violate her media gag order by ghostwriting an op-ed about his Ukrainian lobbying work, which prosecutors uncovered last week.

  • December 6, 2017

    7th Circ. Wary Of Reviving Barnes & Noble Breach Action

    At least one judge on a Seventh Circuit panel on Wednesday grappled with the prospect of reviving a proposed class action against Barnes & Noble over its 2012 security breach, wondering whether it’s enough to claim economic damages if the California and Illinois customers who lost money through the hack got it back within three days.

  • December 6, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Xiaomi, Disney, Rogers Communications

    Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi could be valued at up to $100 billion in a 2018 IPO, Disney is nearing a deal to buy assets from 21st Century Fox that in total could be worth more than $60 billion, and Rogers Communications may sell multiple assets, including the MLB’s Toronto Blue Jays.

  • December 6, 2017

    DOJ Says AT&T Misled Court In Bid For February Trial Date

    The U.S. Department of Justice fired back Tuesday at AT&T's request for an expeditious trial challenging its $85.4 billion deal to purchase Time Warner, saying the telecom giant's motion was misleading.

  • December 6, 2017

    Brands Are Turning Trademark Cease-And-Desists Into Ads

    Bud Light used an actor dressed as a medieval town crier last week to ask a Minnesota brewery to stop using the company’s trademarks, becoming the latest brand to transform a cease-and-desist into a marketing stunt.

Expert Analysis

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.

  • Being There: Preparing Witnesses For Depositions

    Alan Hoffman

    Preparing witnesses to be deposed is a critical element of discovery. It is important to remember that each witness is an individual with unique personal qualities, strengths and weaknesses. Getting to know the witness helps establish rapport and trust, says Alan Hoffman of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: The Sidley-Exelon Partnership

    Kelly Huggins

    Exelon Corp. and Sidley Austin LLP have been working together on both short- and long-term pro bono matters for the past 10 years. We offer a glimpse of how we got started and what we have done in the hope that other corporate legal departments and law firms might find ways to work together to meet the legal needs of the poor, say Kelly Huggins, pro bono counsel at Sidley Austin, and Margaret Balsley-Cross, assistant general counsel at Exelon.

  • Recipe For Legal Project Management: Look To BBQ Champs

    Anthony Rospert

    As a master certified barbecue judge with the Kansas City Barbeque Society, I have noticed that the top pitmasters follow a consistent process in approaching each and every competition. Their "secret sauce" — employing project management principles — can also help lawyers achieve success, says Anthony Rospert of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Pendulum May Be Swinging Away From Fair Use

    Meaghan Kent

    Over the past year or so, courts have begun to temper the fair use defense to copyright infringement. The KinderGuides decision last month from the Southern District of New York is the most recent example of this growing trend, say attorneys with Venable LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Can You Practice In Your State?

    Eve Runyon

    The justice gap is a well-documented problem and over the past two decades, law firms have mobilized attorneys to provide millions of hours of pro bono every year. But for many in-house counsel, there remains a big hurdle — restrictive multijurisdictional practice rules, says Eve Runyon, president and CEO of Pro Bono Institute.

  • Opinion

    Representing Women At The Intersection Of Law And Finance

    Andrea Mitchell

    To the extent that companies have tolerated predominantly male leadership in the past because it was deemed necessary for growth and prosperity, or viewed diversity and the underrepresentation of women strictly as human resources issues, a growing body of research suggests otherwise, say Andrea Mitchell and Valerie Hletko of Buckley Sandler LLP.

  • Series

    Making Pro Bono Work: Building Sponsorship Relationships

    Michael Scudder

    Within their first year, associates should make it a priority to take on a pro bono matter and approach a partner about supervising the project. By collaborating with a partner on a pro bono case, young associates can cultivate sponsorship relationships while simultaneously contributing to the public good, say Michael Scudder and Jay Mitchell of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • 9th Circ. Addresses Lower Court Split On False Ad Cases

    Cortlin Lannin

    Last week, the Ninth Circuit's decision in Davidson v. Kimberly-Clark answered a question that has long split the district courts in that circuit: whether a plaintiff in federal court who was previously deceived by allegedly false or misleading advertising possesses Article III standing to seek an injunction targeting that advertising, even when she has become aware of the truth about the product, says Cortlin Lannin of Covington & Burling LLP.

  • House Bill Would Raise Stakes Of Congressional Inquiries

    Steven Ross

    On Monday, the House passed a bill that, if enacted, would shift the current landscape regarding judicial review of congressional subpoenas and place significant burdens on all recipients of such subpoenas, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.