Media & Entertainment

  • March 23, 2017

    Senate Votes To Undo FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules

    The U.S. Senate on Thursday passed a resolution to repeal broadband privacy rules issued by the Federal Communications Commission last year, leaving the fate of the hotly contested measure in the hands of the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • March 23, 2017

    Dean Foods Chairman Feared His Wife Was Wired By Feds

    The defense in the insider trading trial of prominent gambler Billy Walters in a New York federal court hammered the government’s star witness on his lies and swindle, little and large, and reveled in revealing former Dean Foods chairman Tom Davis took his wife to a cemetery and asked her whether she was wearing a wire.

  • March 23, 2017

    Court Says Netflix Must Pay Jones Day Rates In Dispute

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Wednesday ordered Netflix to pay an $800,000 legal bill for Relativity Media arising from a dispute over Netflix's efforts to stream two Relativity movies before they hit theaters, and also rebuked the streaming pioneer for its tactics regarding the bills for Jones Day fees.

  • March 23, 2017

    Seneca Say $115M Slot Share With NY State Will Be The Last

    The president of the Seneca Nation on Thursday said that the federally recognized tribe will no longer make payments of about $115 million a year to the state of New York under their tribal-state gambling compact, saying that the 2002 deal clearly called for an end to the payments after 14 years.

  • March 23, 2017

    DirecTV Settles DOJ's Dodgers Channel Info-Sharing Suit

    DirecTV and AT&T reached a deal Thursday to settle the U.S. Department of Justice's claims that the companies illegally shared sensitive information about negotiations to carry the Dodgers’ official local broadcast partner, agreeing to crack down on their executives' conversations with rivals.

  • March 23, 2017

    'Home Improvement' Creators Win Appeal Over Disney Profits

    Creators of the hit 1990s sitcom "Home Improvement" won a bid to reverse a lower court’s decision to toss their case against Walt Disney Pictures for unpaid syndication profits at a California appellate court on Wednesday.

  • March 23, 2017

    Zillow Wants $8.3M Verdict In Image Infringement Suit Tossed

    Real estate website Zillow on Wednesday claimed a jury erred last month when it gave a real estate photography company more than $8.3 million for its copyright violation claims against Zillow, saying it could not be held liable for images that were handled entirely by automatic systems.

  • March 23, 2017

    T-Mobile Urges FCC Not To Delay Post-Auction Transition

    T-Mobile encouraged the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday to refuse broadcaster requests to delay the transition of stations to new channels after the broadcast incentive auction, arguing that there is no justification for extending or delaying the process.

  • March 23, 2017

    Apache Tribe Targets NIGC Letter For Rejecting Gambling Bid

    The Fort Sill Apache Tribe urged a D.C. federal judge Wednesday to let it add claims to a suit over the National Indian Gaming Commission’s rejection of the tribe's gambling bid, saying a recent court ruling backed the tribe’s contention that the NIGC issued a new decision in January the tribe can challenge in court.

  • March 23, 2017

    Fired NY Post Sports Columnist Drops Suit Over Trump Tweet

    A former sports columnist for the New York Post who said he was wrongfully fired for a personal tweet he sent comparing President Donald Trump's inauguration to Pearl Harbor and 9/11 has dropped his suit in New York State Supreme Court, after the paper moved to toss the allegations.

  • March 23, 2017

    2nd Circ. Looks Ready To Close Book On Newkirk And Maxim

    The Second Circuit looked ready Thursday to move on from former Bryan Cave LLP transactional attorney Harvey Newkirk's quest to exonerate himself after a jury convicted him of helping a client defraud lenders of $8 million as part of a failed ploy to acquire Maxim magazine.

  • March 23, 2017

    Photographers Fight Fees After Contract Loss To AP, NFL

    Photographers whose claims against The Associated Press, the NFL and Replay Photos over royalties from their pictures were dismissed by a New York federal judge asked the court not to grant the attorneys' fee requests put forth by the defendants, arguing Wednesday that their case wasn’t objectively unreasonable.

  • March 22, 2017

    Hollywood Reporter Freelancers Get OK For $900K Wage Deal

    A California judge on Wednesday approved a $900,000 deal by The Hollywood Reporter’s parent company to end claims that it misclassified freelance content producers as independent contractors instead of employees, saying the deal, which will pay class members almost $15,000 on average, is fair, reasonable and adequate.

  • March 22, 2017

    Marketing Co. Says It's The Victim In Spamming Accusations

    A Washington-state-based marketing firm that made headlines earlier this month when a known security researcher alleged it was operating a massive, illegal spam operation involving 1.4 billion email accounts filed a lawsuit Tuesday contending it was actually the victim of an elaborate setup involving a cyberattack.

  • March 22, 2017

    Martha Stewart Suit May Yield New Case Law, Judge Says

    New case law could get cobbled together from arguments over public investor claims that domestic guru Martha Stewart got an unfair share of her company’s $353 million sale to Sequential Brands Group Inc. in late 2015, a Delaware vice chancellor said late Wednesday.

  • March 22, 2017

    Rodale Settles Copyright Row With Dad Who Streamed Birth

    Publishing giant Rodale Inc. has struck a confidential settlement with a California man who filed copyright infringement claims after the company used video footage he inadvertently posted on Facebook of his son’s birth, according to a filing in New York federal court Wednesday.

  • March 22, 2017

    Law Profs Back Bid To Unseal $500M Oculus Case Transcript

    In the aftermath of a $500 million verdict against the virtual reality company Oculus, two law professors and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on Tuesday requested that a Texas federal court unseal portions of the trial transcript related to the jury’s finding of copyright infringement.

  • March 22, 2017

    Walters Jury Hears 'Bat Phone' For Prostitutes, Not Trades

    A defense team seeking to clear gambler Billy Walters of insider trading began a no-holds-barred cross-examination Wednesday of former Dean Foods chair Tom Davis, showing a Manhattan federal jury records of calls the star government witness made to escort services across the country.

  • March 22, 2017

    Jared Leto Asks 9th Circ. To Revive TMZ Swift Video Suit

    Singer and actor Jared Leto’s production company asked the Ninth Circuit on Monday to toss out a lower court’s ruling dismissing his copyright infringement suit against TMZ, saying the videographer behind a clip of him criticizing Taylor Swift didn’t have the right to sell the clip.

  • March 22, 2017

    Justices Told Law Nixing Tribal Casino Suit Is Constitutional

    The U.S. Department of the Interior has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a petition by a Michigan man seeking to revive his challenge to a tribal casino project near his land, saying a federal law enacted to block suits opposing the project isn’t unconstitutional.

Expert Analysis

  • What Cos. Must Know About Social Media And Insurance

    Mikaela Whitman

    The instantaneous worldwide access that social media provides, with the ability to repurpose information in the public domain, can multiply a company's liability exposure with a single click. Mikaela Whitman of Liner LLP discusses what steps to take in order to maximize available insurance coverage for social media claims.

  • 10 Tips For Better Legal Negotiations

    Marc J. Siegel

    Like everything else, the art of negotiation starts by having a conversation. It’s about being respectful, finding common ground, knowing what you want and, most importantly, listening. A conversation between two lawyers can be complicated at best, but by employing a few techniques and tactics, it doesn’t have to be that way, says Marc Siegel of Siegel & Dolan Ltd.

  • How A Tweet With No Words Could Impact NY Labor Law

    Laurent S. Drogin

    When now-former New York Post writer Bart Hubbuch sued his former employer for firing him over a tweet last month, he roused Section 201-d of the New York Labor Law from its slumber. Few employers are likely aware this law exists and it remains to be seen whether media attention from this case will motivate attorneys who represent employees to add the law to their toolbox, says Laurent Drogin of Tarter Krinsky & Drogin LLP.

  • Monthly Column

    Gray Matters: Decision Error

    Gray Matters

    Lawyers make hundreds of decisions during the course of advising a client, consummating a transaction or litigating a case. In this new column, dispute resolution experts Bob Creo and Selina Shultz explore the theory, science and practical aspects of how decisions are made in the legal community.

  • Law Schools And Law Firms: Seeking Common Ground

    Randy Gordon

    What we don’t know is whether the teaching and practice of law are undergoing massive structural changes or we’re still digging out from the worst economic collapse since the Depression. But what we do know is that the missions of the most forward-looking law schools and law firms are converging in ways that were unimaginable 10 years ago, says Randy Gordon, a partner at Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP and executive professor of law at Te... (continued)

  • The Legalization Of Sports Betting: Lessons From Nevada

    Dennis Gutwald

    For now, Nevada operators have a monopoly on legal sports betting while other states are faced with prohibition. With the increasing likelihood that sports betting soon will be legalized in many states, there are five key things to know about Nevada’s success, says Dennis Gutwald of McDonald Carano Wilson LLP.

  • Gorsuch's Originalism In The Age Of Bytes And Blockchains

    April Doss

    With U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch kicking off this week, it’s worth considering how his originalist philosophy might affect cases addressing individual privacy, government surveillance and private sector use of rapidly changing technologies. When people need practical solutions to legal questions at the intersection of modern technology, privacy and the law, originalism frequently fails, says April Doss... (continued)

  • Not From Around Here? Trying A Case As An Out-Of-Towner

    William Oxley

    The importance of authenticity is magnified when trying a case outside your home jurisdiction. While using references to local landmarks or history can help make arguments relatable, adopting local expressions or style in an attempt to ingratiate oneself with the judge and jury almost always backfires, say William Oxley and Meghan Rohling Kelly of Dechert LLP.

  • FCC Takes A Backseat In Regulating Online Privacy

    Adrienne Ehrhardt

    Shortly after the Federal Communications Commission stayed the data security regulation piece of its broadband privacy order, a joint resolution of Congress proposed to repeal the entire order. Despite this rollback on FCC regulation of internet privacy, the FCC may still have a role in cybersecurity regulation outside the online space, say Adrienne Ehrhardt and Michelle Dama of Michael Best & Friedrich LLP.

  • How The Most Profitable Law Firms Structure Their C-Suites

    Anita Turner

    The most successful Am Law 200 law firms have evolved from being partner-run to being run by a group of highly skilled professionals reporting to firm shareholders. The data collected from our recent survey indicates this model is generally conducive to increased profitability, says Anita Turner, senior director at Colliers International.