Media & Entertainment

  • November 25, 2020

    Facebook, Twitter Sued Over IP Used To Quash COVID-19 Lies

    Many of the core functions of Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat, like targeted advertising, notifications and even tools used for flagging fake COVID-19 news, are infringing patents owned by a Xerox subsidiary, the company said Wednesday in three suits filed in California federal court.

  • November 25, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Backs PTAB Win For Twitter On Video Patent

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday upheld the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's invalidation of a VidStream social media patent, rejecting the patentee's argument that Twitter had not proven that the book that rendered the patent obvious was available to the public.

  • November 25, 2020

    Notice Dispute Can't Block TV Co. From Malpractice Coverage

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday handed a partial win to a TV station fighting for insurance coverage of underlying malpractice claims, ruling that the company may be able to go after its lawyer's onetime insurer for damages even if the attorney ran afoul of notification requirements under the insurance policy.

  • November 25, 2020

    Sen. Presses Twitter, Facebook On 'Coordinated Censorship'

    Republican Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., submitted additional questions to Facebook and Twitter regarding their practices of content moderation and user data tracking, after he grilled the CEOs of both companies when they spoke before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

  • November 25, 2020

    Facebook's $650M Biometric Privacy Deal Draws 1.5M Users

    More than 1.5 million Illinois Facebook users are seeking to claim a share of a proposed $650 million deal to resolve biometric privacy claims brought against the social media company in California federal court, according to a Wednesday filing by counsel for the parties, who had previously said that roughly 6 million consumers were eligible to participate in the settlement.

  • November 25, 2020

    NLRB Clears Game Tech Co. In Dispute Over Separation Pacts

    The National Labor Relations Board has reversed an administrative law judge's finding that a gaming technology company's separation agreements ran afoul of federal labor law, with one member dissenting and saying that the board's decision "only makes bad law worse."

  • November 25, 2020

    Media, Energy-Focused SPACs Raise $561M In Market Debuts

    Two blank-check companies, one led by former Disney executives and the other backed by Apollo Global Management, started trading Wednesday after raising a combined $561 million in initial public offerings.

  • November 25, 2020

    Media Co. IAC Promotes Lead M&A Atty To General Counsel

    Media conglomerate IAC, which owns companies including The Daily Beast, Care.com and Vimeo, is promoting its lead mergers and acquisitions attorney to senior vice president and general counsel after she helped steer some of its largest transactions, the company said Tuesday. 

  • November 25, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Judge Tells Attys To Prep For Trial Or Withdraw

    Lawyers for parents in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case need to be ready for a trial with adequate precautions or else withdraw from the case, a federal judge in Massachusetts said Wednesday, responding sharply to four defendants' request for a seven-month delay amid the coronavirus pandemic.

  • November 25, 2020

    Do's & Don'ts For Policing Workers' Off-Duty Social Media Use

    With fierce debates and controversial content dominating social media feeds this chaotic year, employees' online activity can cause problems for businesses, even if workers are posting while off the clock. Here are four tips employers should keep in mind when an employee's social media posts cause unrest in the workplace.

  • November 25, 2020

    3 Firms Steer $2.2B Simon & Schuster Sale By ViacomCBS

    ViacomCBS Inc. has agreed to sell book publisher Simon & Schuster to Penguin Random House LLC for $2.175 billion, the companies said Wednesday, in a deal that is aimed at accelerating ViacomCBS' push into areas like streaming and was guided by Shearman & Sterling, Davis Polk and Arnold & Porter.

  • November 24, 2020

    Federalist Publisher's 'Salt Mine' Tweet Is Unlawful: NLRB

    A tweet from The Federalist's publisher saying he would send employees "back to the salt mine" if they tried to unionize was an "obvious threat" that violated federal labor law, the National Labor Relations Board ruled Tuesday, ordering him to delete the tweet.

  • November 24, 2020

    Defense Committees Told To Stay Wary Of Ligado Interference

    Congress shouldn't remove a set of provisions from the U.S. Department of Defense's budget aimed at shoring up the effects of the Federal Communications Commission's decision to let Ligado Networks build out a mobile network next to airwaves used by the military, industry heavyweights say.

  • November 24, 2020

    10 Firms Steer Pot SPAC's $1.2B Deal With Jay-Z

    The biggest blank check company in cannabis on Tuesday created a marijuana powerhouse valued at nearly $1.2 billion and featuring rapper Jay-Z as its leading visionary, in a deal steered by 10 firms including Paul Hastings LLP, Cooley LLP and Reed Smith LLP.

  • November 24, 2020

    Fla. Judge Confirms Cinemex Ch. 11 Plan

    A Florida bankruptcy judge on Tuesday signed off on the Chapter 11 reorganization plan for movie theater operator Cinemex Holdings USA Inc. that its attorneys say will allow it to jettison about $200 million in debt and return as a leaner and more competitive business.

  • November 24, 2020

    Networks Say Looser Ownership Rules Could Save Broadcast

    The U.S. Supreme Court must not seal a bleak future for TV networks by maintaining Federal Communications Commission ownership restrictions that prevent local stations from combining, major broadcasters wrote in amicus briefs filed Monday.

  • November 24, 2020

    MC5 Guitarist Shreds Old Spice Over Alleged Likeness Ripoff

    The lead guitarist of iconic Detroit rock band MC5 hit The Procter & Gamble Co. with a California federal court suit Tuesday alleging Old Spice used an image of his signature stars and stripes Fender on its "Guitar Solo" body wash without his permission.

  • November 24, 2020

    FTC's Zoom Deal Signals New Data Security Plan Under Dems

    The Federal Trade Commission's two Democrats offered a detailed strategy for boosting the agency's data security and privacy enforcement approach in an objection to a recent nonmonetary settlement against Zoom, laying out a plan that could soon come to fruition as their party readies to take the helm of the agency next year.

  • November 24, 2020

    Facebook, Princeton Hit With Refreshed AI Data IP Claims

    A 3D-imaging firm took another crack at copyright claims accusing Facebook and Princeton University of illegally downloading its data to use in artificial intelligence projects in a new suit filed Monday in California federal court.

  • November 24, 2020

    Dish, Altice Sued Over Infringing Network Patents

    Dish and Altice are accused of infringing patents issued in the early 2000s with smart devices that use technology to reduce antenna interference and synchronize communication systems, according to a flurry of lawsuits leveled in a Texas federal court this week.

  • November 24, 2020

    FCC Finds Verizon Paid 'Unjust' Pole Attachment Charges

    The Federal Communications Commission has found that an electric utility company that operates in Maryland made Verizon pay unreasonable charges for attachments on their utility poles and handed down a maximum rate the utility company could charge the telecom giant.

  • November 24, 2020

    GOP Reps. Seek GAO Audit Of Ag Dept. Rural Broadband Pilot

    Nearly a dozen House Republicans have asked the Government Accountability Office to probe the operations of a pilot program run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fund rural broadband projects, saying they worry millions of dollars are going to waste.

  • November 24, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Lennar, Goldman Properties, Greenberg

    Lennar has reportedly paid $29 million for 43.7 acres in Florida, Goldman Properties is said to have dropped $5.2 million on two Miami properties, and investor Scott Greenberg is reportedly hoping to build a Chicago arena where as many as 80 people could gather to play virtual reality games.

  • November 24, 2020

    Netflix Settles 'Choose Your Own Adventure' Trademark Suit

    Netflix Inc. has agreed to settle a lawsuit that claimed the company's interactive movie "Black Mirror: Bandersnatch" infringed the trademark rights to the once-popular "Choose Your Own Adventure" book series.

  • November 23, 2020

    NBA Star Seeks Docs To See If Judge's Son Presents Conflict

    New Orleans Pelicans star Zion Williamson said attorneys for his former agent suing him for $100 million over their breakup are refusing to produce information needed to assess whether a related matter involving Morgan & Morgan might present a conflict for the Florida state court judge overseeing his case, since the judge's son is a partner with that firm.

Expert Analysis

  • NY Contract Litigation Indicates Limits Of COVID-19 Defenses

    Author Photo

    Although there has not yet been a decision on the merits, a wave of COVID-19 litigation concerning force majeure, impossibility and frustration of purpose in New York indicates that using pandemic-related excuses to avoid contractual obligations may be limited, says Seth Kruglak at Norton Rose.

  • Ethics Reminders As Employees Move To Or From Gov't

    Author Photo

    Many organizations are making plans for executives to go into government jobs, or for government officials to join a private sector team, but they must understand the many ethics rules that can put a damper on just how valuable the former employee or new hire can be, say Scott Thomas and Jennifer Carrier at Blank Rome.

  • A Key To Helping Clients Make Better Decisions During Crisis

    Author Photo

    As the pandemic brings a variety of legal stresses for businesses, lawyers must understand the emotional dynamic of a crisis and the particular energy it produces to effectively fulfill their role as advisers, say Meredith Parfet and Aaron Solomon at Ravenyard Group.

  • Avoiding Copyright Liability For Tattoo Depiction In Media

    Author Photo

    Two recent diverging copyright decisions concerning Take-Two video games' depiction of professional athletes' tattoos provide guidance on strategically using the implied license and fair use defenses when digital reproductions may infringe copyrighted tattoos, says Rowley Rice at Munger Tolles.

  • Ethics Considerations For Law Firms Implementing AI

    Author Photo

    Richard Finkelman and Yihua Astle at Berkeley Research Group discuss the ethical and bias concerns law firms must address when implementing artificial intelligence-powered applications for recruiting, conflict identification and client counseling.

  • Picking The Right Location And Tools For Virtual Courtrooms

    Author Photo

    Attorneys should consider the pros and cons of participating in virtual court proceedings from home versus their law firm offices, and whether they have the right audio, video and team communication tools for their particular setup, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Beware Atty Ethics Rules When Reporting COVID-19 Fraud

    Author Photo

    Attorneys considering blowing the whistle on False Claims Act violations by recipients of COVID-19 relief may face a number of ethical constraints on their ability to disclose client information and file qui tam actions, say Breon Peace and Jennifer Kennedy Park at Cleary.

  • Looking For Judicial Activists? Check The Footnotes

    Author Photo

    U.S. Supreme Court nominees typically face intense questioning over potential judicial activism, but a better way to gauge judges' activist tendencies may be to look at the footnotes in their opinions, say Christopher Collier at Hawkins Parnell and Michael Arndt at Rohan Law.

  • Best Practices For Legal Technology Adoption

    Author Photo

    The pandemic has accelerated the need to improve the practice of law through technology, but law firms and in-house legal departments must first ensure they have employee buy-in and well-defined processes for new digital tools, say Dan Broderick at BlackBoiler and Daryl Shetterly at Orrick.

  • Opinion

    FTC Exceeded Its Authority In Zoom Cybersecurity Settlement

    Author Photo

    In light of the Federal Trade Commission's requirement, in excess of its statutory authority, that Zoom overhaul its data security as part of a recent deceptive practices settlement, companies shouldn't assent to unfounded relief even when challenging the agency could result in costly litigation, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • The Pandemic's Long-Term Impact On Law Firm Operations

    Author Photo

    Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey looks at how pandemic-era remote work has changed the way law firms operate — from shifts in secretarial functions to associate professional development — and explains why some alterations may be here to stay.

  • Opinion

    Lack Of Access To Remote Court Proceedings Is Inexcusable

    Author Photo

    Blanket rules that bar recording or dissemination of remote public court proceedings impede presumptive common law and First Amendment right of access, greatly expand courts' powers over nonparties, and likely run afoul of U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Matthew Schafer at ViacomCBS.

  • Opinion

    Why Attacks On Trump's Election Lawyers Are Problematic

    Author Photo

    The vilification of Jones Day and Porter Wright for their involvement in President Donald Trump's election lawsuits is an attack on lawyers' duty to advocate for their clients' causes fearlessly and zealously within the bounds of the law, says Pierce O'Donnell at Greenberg Glusker.

  • M&A Poised For Growth In The Biden Era

    Author Photo

    The M&A market is well positioned for recovery and growth under a Biden administration and divided Congress, which will likely gain control over the coronavirus pandemic, pass a stimulus package, and provide greater transparency in antitrust enforcement, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Avoiding 6 Common E-Discovery Production Pitfalls

    Author Photo

    Vanessa Barsanti and Sarah Mahoney at Redgrave explore how attorneys can prevent collateral discovery disputes by efficiently overseeing the electronic document review process and ensuring the integrity of the information provided to opposing counsel.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!