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Native American

  • June 18, 2018

    GCs Tackle Law Firm Culture In Diversity Push

    Following an American Bar Association pledge, in-house attorneys are taking a harder line in demanding diversity from their outside counsel, and they're seeking to play a larger role in the workings of the law firms they hire.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Hurdles Facing BigLaw’s Minority Women

    We asked BigLaw for data on female minority lawyers for the first time this year, and the results show an industry that is failing to attract and retain them. Here’s a look at the challenges facing these attorneys — and how a few firms are defying the norm.

  • June 18, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Equity Partners

    The legal industry is making sluggish gains when it comes to attracting and retaining attorneys of color, but this select group of firms is taking broader strides to diversify at the top.

  • June 18, 2018

    Ariz. Tribe Probes Border Patrol's Collision With Member

    The Tohono O'odham Nation announced Friday that its police department is investigating an incident in which a U.S. Border Patrol vehicle in Arizona knocked down a member of the tribe, who was filming the episode, and then drove away.

  • June 18, 2018

    Utah Judge Rebuffs Ute Tribe's Stay Bid In Contract Row

    A Utah federal judge on Friday rejected the Ute Indian Tribe’s bid to stay a ruling that the tribe’s contract dispute with a former employee must be heard in state court rather than tribal court, saying the tribe isn’t likely to win in its appeal to the Tenth Circuit.

  • June 18, 2018

    Calif. Tribe Asks 9th Circ. To Revisit DOI Casino Land Ruling

    The Cachil DeHe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community urged the Ninth Circuit on Friday to rethink its ruling backing the U.S. Department of the Interior’s decision to acquire land for another California tribe’s casino project, saying the DOI gave preferential treatment to the other tribe in its review process.

  • June 18, 2018

    In Their Own Words: Minority Partners On Reaching The Top

    Despite decades of industrywide initiatives, movement up the ladder has stagnated for minority lawyers. Here, five industry success stories tell Law360 about the paths they took and what needs to change in BigLaw.

  • June 18, 2018

    High Court To Consider Feds' Hovercraft Ban In Alaska Again

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Monday to review a Ninth Circuit ruling holding that the National Park Service has the right to enforce its hovercraft ban on an Alaska river, setting the high court up to consider the dispute for the second time.

  • June 18, 2018

    Tribes Want Indian Child Welfare Act Challenge Nixed

    The Cherokee Nation and other Native American tribes on Friday asked for a quick win in a suit from various states and some foster families challenging the Indian Child Welfare Act, saying the parties bringing the suit are trying to undo decades of progress.

  • June 15, 2018

    Minority Lawyers On Why They Left BigLaw

    Despite the proliferation of diversity committees and inclusion initiatives, corporate law firms remain overwhelmingly white and male, especially at leadership levels. Here, minority attorneys discuss their reasons for leaving a large firm.

  • June 15, 2018

    Taking On The ‘Petri Dish’ Of BigLaw Bias

    The often-informal processes for deciding matters like compensation at law firms can create, as one expert put it, a “petri dish” for the effects of unconscious bias. Here’s how some firms are looking to shake up the system.

  • June 15, 2018

    The Best Firms For Minority Attorneys

    While U.S. law firms have long vowed to make their ranks more diverse and inclusive, the industry has long failed to deliver on those promises. Here are the firms making some headway, according to this year’s Diversity Snapshot.

  • June 15, 2018

    Law360’s Diversity Snapshot: By The Numbers

    Efforts to increase diversity have again yielded few meaningful changes in law firm demographics, according to Law360’s annual headcount survey, even as law schools continue to enroll students of color in increasing numbers.

  • June 15, 2018

    Law360’s Pro Say: What BigLaw Should Do About Diversity

    For years law firms have had programs aimed at increasing attorney diversity, but nothing is working. On this week’s Pro Say podcast we take a look at our latest survey of diversity at law firms, and unpack what experts say are the things that could actually move the needle on this issue.

  • June 15, 2018

    Tribal, Green Groups Sue DOI To Force Plan For Mine Closure

    The SIerra Club and three groups including Navajo and Hopi tribe members asked an Arizona federal court Thursday to order the U.S. Department of the Interior to figure out how to clean up a coal mine that feeds the Navajo Generating Station, saying it violated federal law by failing to do so in anticipation of the plant’s closure late next year.

  • June 15, 2018

    Senate Funding Bill Staves Off Cuts To Indian Programs

    The Senate Appropriations Committee approved a $36 billion funding bill Thursday that largely increased spending over the levels proposed by the Trump administration for federal programs providing health care, education and other services to Native American tribes.

  • June 15, 2018

    EPA, Corps Close To Clean Water Rule Replacement Proposal

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers moved closer on Friday to officially proposing a replacement for a controversial Obama-era rule defining the Clean Water Act's reach.

  • June 15, 2018

    SD Justices Skirt Merits In Nixing Tribes' Keystone XL Appeal

    South Dakota's high court has tossed an appeal from two Native American tribes and an advocacy group in their fight against the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, but did so on jurisdictional grounds instead of reaching the merits of the case.

  • June 15, 2018

    Seminoles Seek Quick Win Against IHS Over Health Funding

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida has asked a D.C. federal court for a win in its suit alleging the Indian Health Service won't pay about $160,000 in overhead and administrative costs to fund the tribe's medical services as required.

  • June 14, 2018

    Sprint Defends FCC 5G Cell Review Exemptions At DC Circ.

    Sprint Corp. asked for permission Wednesday to intervene on behalf of the FCC against consolidated D.C. Circuit challenges by Native American tribes and environmentalists contesting an agency rule exempting small-cell fixtures necessary for building up next-generation or 5G networks from environmental and historic reviews.

Expert Analysis

  • Knowledge Lawyers Can Help Firms Stay Ahead Of The Curve

    Vanessa Pinto Villa

    In a profession notoriously averse to change, it should come as no surprise that there is skepticism about the value of having attorneys perform nonbillable tasks. But U.S. law firms have slowly begun to incorporate knowledge lawyers into their operations — and the trend is likely to continue, says Vanessa Pinto Villa of Hogan Lovells.

  • Wash. Tribes' High Court Win Raises Treaty Rights Concerns

    Lee Redeye

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed a major win for Washington tribes in Washington v. United States. However, the nature of the Supreme Court's affirmation — a 4-4 split without a written decision — means that its precedential value is questionable, says Lee Redeye of Lippes Mathias Wexler Friedman LLP.

  • An Unprecedented Look Inside The FARA Unit

    Brian Fleming

    For close observers of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, the June 8 release by the U.S. Department of Justice of over 50 FARA advisory opinions was a watershed. These opinions offer an unprecedented glimpse into how the FARA Registration Unit interprets the law, say Brian Fleming and Andrew Herman of Miller & Chevalier Chtd.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 2

    John Reed Stark

    The legal industry has already begun to feel the impact of anti-bribery and anti-money laundering requirements. When involved with cryptocurrency trading and remittance, law firms face more than the risk of being perceived as organizations that support money laundering practices, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • High Court Passes On New Chance To Clarify CWA Confusion

    Andrea Driggs

    With its recent decision in Hughes v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court has passed on an opportunity to shed light on its prior rulings on the statutory reach of the federal Clean Water Act, long a source of confusion for lower courts and litigants alike, say Andrea Driggs and Christopher Thomas of Perkins Coie LLP.

  • Why Lawyers Shouldn't Accept Fees In Cryptocurrency: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    Law firms are increasingly accepting cryptocurrency as payment for services. While this might seem innovative and forward-thinking, ironically it is much more of a throwback, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • Impediments To Legal Industry's 'Inevitable' Future: Part 2

    Craig Levinson

    I agree with the legal pundits speculating that NewLaw’s present and future disruptors will radically change the legal services industry, but that change may not come quite as rapidly as predicted. Regardless, now is the time for both the incumbents and the challengers to best position themselves for the eventual shakeup, says Craig Levinson, founder of Levity Partners.

  • Opinion

    Exempt Indian Country From The 'Kiddie Tax'

    Nicole Elliott

    Congress should move to exclude the transfer of tribal funds to young tribal members from being taxed under the "Kiddie tax," a tax instated in 1986 and amplified by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, say attorneys at Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Impediments To Legal Industry's 'Inevitable' Future: Part 1

    Craig Levinson

    Legal pundits continue to make predictions that newer entrants into the industry — NewLaw firms, the Big Four and alternative legal service providers — will progressively seize greater amounts of market share from traditional law firms. But the BigLaw response has been underwhelming at best, and a glimpse at the market forces puts its lack of urgency into perspective, says Craig Levinson, founder of Levity Partners.

  • Comity And Fairness Well-Served By Upper Skagit Decision

    Jennifer Weddle

    The U.S. Supreme Court's restraint in its Upper Skagit decision is appreciated in Indian Country. Even if the immovable property doctrine applies equally to states and tribes as the dissent suggests, the doctrine is not necessarily worth keeping in today's nonmonarchial society, says Jennifer Weddle of Greenberg Traurig LLP.