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Native American

  • August 14, 2018

    How One Firm Moved The Needle On Disability Inclusion

    This global law firm has recently focused on creating opportunities for people with disabilities across its ranks, and its efforts are already showing results. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 14, 2018

    Alaska, Groups Weigh In On High Court Hovercraft Ban Case

    The State of Alaska, an Alaska Native regional corporation and others on Tuesday weighed in on a moose hunter’s U.S. Supreme Court appeal of a Ninth Circuit ruling that said the National Park Service has the right to enforce its hovercraft ban on an Alaska river.

  • August 14, 2018

    Feds Give Green Light For Proposed Alaska Gold Mine

    The U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have signed off on a joint record of decision that provides key federal environmental approvals for a proposed Alaska gold mine, a move that was done under the direction of an executive order aimed at speeding up federal reviews.

  • August 14, 2018

    Health Center Settles Claims Over Navy Member's Job Rights

    A Phoenix-based health center dedicated to providing medical services to urban Native Americans, Alaska Natives and others has agreed to a settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice over claims that it violated the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act when it declined to renew a U.S. Navy Reserves doctor's contract.

  • August 14, 2018

    Tribal College Wins Toss Of Former Worker's Sex Bias Suit

    A Montana federal judge has tossed a sex discrimination suit against Salish Kootenai College from its former director of academic success, holding that since the school functioned as an arm of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, it wasn't an employer subject to litigation under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 13, 2018

    States Push Back Against Dismissal Bids In Opioid MDL

    Dozens of states slammed a bid by drugmakers and distributor McKesson Corp. to dismiss claims that they fueled the opioid crisis, telling an Ohio federal judge who is overseeing the opioid multidistrict litigation that a state's ability to protect the health of its citizens must not be restricted.

  • August 13, 2018

    Opioid MDL Bellwether Trial Postponed 6 Months

    An Ohio federal judge on Monday delayed the first bellwether trial in multidistrict litigation over the opioid epidemic by nearly six months to September 2019, the latest sign that dreams of quickly resolving the epic legal battle may not be realized.

  • August 13, 2018

    9th Circ. Snuffs Out Tobacco Co.'s Challenge On $58M Tax Tab

    The Ninth Circuit on Monday allowed the U.S. to collect $58 million from a Native American-owned tobacco manufacturer for unpaid federal excise taxes and related interest and penalties because neither a congressional statute nor a treaty with the Yakama Nation from the 1800s created exemptions for tax liabilities.

  • August 13, 2018

    10th Circ. Backs Feds' Win In Tribal Trust Account Dispute

    A Tenth Circuit panel on Monday backed a lower court's decision to toss a bid by the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town for a ruling that it is the rightful owner of a tribal trust account containing income derived from disputed land.

  • August 13, 2018

    Man Gets 8 Years In Prison For Oil And Gas Scheme

    A federal judge on Friday sentenced a man to more than eight years in prison for wire fraud and money laundering in connection with allegations that he falsely told investors he owned oil and gas leases in Montana, Texas and Oklahoma, including on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation.

  • August 13, 2018

    PTAB Review Trumps State Immunity, DOJ Tells Fed. Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Justice has urged the Federal Circuit to find that state sovereign immunity does not extend to reviews at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, saying the court all but decided the issue in a recent case involving a Native American tribe.

  • August 13, 2018

    T-Mobile, Tribes Weigh In On FCC Spectrum Rules

    T-Mobile and several Native American tribes urged the Federal Communications Commission to ease restrictions on how spectrum reserved for educational content can be used and licensed, saying the move would modernize broadband service.

  • August 13, 2018

    Ariz. Agency Wants Quick Win In Water Rights Row

    An Arizona water district has moved for a quick win in a dispute over the district's alleged obligations to deliver excess water supply to the Ak-Chin Indian Community, urging a federal court to reject quick win bids filed by the tribe itself and the federal government.

  • August 13, 2018

    FCC Lifeline Reform Will Likely Harm Tribes, DC Circ. Says

    The D.C. Circuit has paused parts of the Federal Communications Commission's plan to alter the way it awards and disburses funds for the Lifeline program that helps poor people afford phone and internet service, saying eligibility changes are likely to shut out tribal customers rather than encourage network expansion as the FCC predicted.

  • August 10, 2018

    How The Legal Industry Lets Down Lawyers With Disabilities

    The dissolution of a five-year-old bar group marks the latest setback for disabled attorneys, who often find little support while navigating an inhospitable industry. This is the first article in a special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Gaining Access: Disabled Lawyers Share Their Stories

    In a series of interviews, lawyers tell Law360 how even well-intentioned professors can create barriers, how inclusivity can help a firm’s litigation prowess, and how “inspirational” can be a dirty word. This article is part of our special report on disability inclusion in the legal industry.

  • August 10, 2018

    Officials Want Police Tactics Kept Secret In Tribal Tax Row

    Michigan officials facing a suit from the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community over the state’s tax authority urged a district court judge Thursday to overturn a magistrate judge’s discovery order, saying the tribe should not be allowed to conduct additional information on law enforcement investigative techniques.

  • August 10, 2018

    BIA Wants Out Of Suit Alleging Land Lease Plot

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs urged a North Dakota federal judge Friday to nix Prima Exploration Inc.’s claims that the agency schemed with two rival companies to end its lease on land within the Fort Berthold Reservation, saying the action is an improper attempt to skirt the administrative review process.

Expert Analysis

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: How To Play The Long Game

    Arun Subramanian

    One of us was a clerk when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg read her Ledbetter dissent from the bench, inviting Congress to act, and the other clerked a few years later, when RBG's prominently displayed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act served as a daily reminder that dissents are not just for show, say Arun Subramanian and Mark Musico of Susman Godfrey LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: In Pursuit Of Precision

    Trevor Morrison

    As clerks for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we learned early on that, when preparing a memorandum or draft opinion, it was essential to present any opposing argument in its strongest possible light. There is a lesson here for today's public debates, says Trevor Morrison, dean of NYU Law School.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

  • 10th Circ. Ruling Is A Win For Tribal Jurisdiction

    Steven Gordon

    Last week, the Tenth Circuit rebalanced the relative bargaining power between tribes and states when it ruled in Navajo Nation v. Dalley that the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act does not permit a state to require that personal injury suits against tribal casinos be litigated in state courts, say Steven Gordon and Philip Baker-Shenk of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 Things I Learned

    Judge John Owens

    A lot has changed since I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 20 years ago. At that time, I had hair and no wife. I also thought I knew everything — but working for the justice made me realize very quickly that I actually knew very little, says Ninth Circuit Judge John Owens.