New Jersey

  • December 11, 2017

    Surgeon Tells Jury Complications Not Limited To J&J Mesh

    The chief of female pelvic medicine at Hackensack University Medical Center told a New Jersey jury Monday that research and her own hundreds of surgeries reveal complications can arise from all methods of pelvic prolapse repair, not just Johnson & Johnson unit Ethicon’s Prolift, which a woman alleges is responsible for debilitating pain.

  • December 11, 2017

    Has Litigation Finance Shed Its Stigma?

    Once a taboo topic in the halls of BigLaw, litigation finance is winning over converts. And the peer pressure is building for rival law firms to join the bandwagon.

  • December 11, 2017

    Why Investors Are Taking The Leap To 3rd-Party Funding

    They often don’t know exactly what they’re buying, and there’s an ever-present chance they could come up empty in a given case. Here’s why investors are flocking to litigation finance anyway.

  • December 11, 2017

    What Your Colleagues Think Of Litigation Finance

    We asked, and you answered. Here are the results of Law360’s inaugural survey on third-party legal funding.

  • December 11, 2017

    Law Firm Doesn't Owe For GSK Contempt Order, 3rd Circ. Told

    The Mississippi law firm accused along with a fund administrator of erroneously distributing settlement money from multidistrict litigation against GlaxoSmithKline urged the Third Circuit on Monday to overturn a Pennsylvania district court’s order to indemnify the administrator, reasoning that the district court no longer had jurisdiction over GSK's already settled contempt allegations.

  • December 11, 2017

    4th Person Cops To $3.9M Insider Trading Scheme In NJ

    A day trader admitted in New Jersey federal court on Monday to taking part in a more than $3.9 million insider trading scheme that involved violating confidentiality agreements with investment banks and short-selling securities before offerings were publicly disclosed, authorities said.

  • December 11, 2017

    Judge OKs Award To Colombian Co. Following Contract Row

    A New Jersey federal judge on Friday confirmed a $290,000 arbitral award issued to a Colombian agroindustrial equipment company following a payment dispute with Delaware-based Aviation Technology and Turbine Service Inc., concluding that the American company had missed its chance to argue that their arbitration agreement wasn't valid.

  • December 11, 2017

    NJ Justices Nix Worker's Contract Barring 3rd-Party Suits

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Monday ruled that an employment contract barring third-party lawsuits wasn’t enforceable under the state’s workers’ compensation law because it contravenes public policy, but a trial court must still determine if the suing employee was partially liable for the injury that prompted his suit. 

  • December 11, 2017

    NJ Bitcoin Investor Accuses UK Firm Of Ponzi Scheme

    A New Jersey-based bitcoin investor on Friday launched a $9.1 million lawsuit in federal court over claims that a business in the United Kingdom ran a virtual-currency Ponzi scheme, alleging a U.K. law firm possibly aided and abetted the illicit plot.

  • December 11, 2017

    NJ Board Revokes Doc's License For Prescription Abuse

    The New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners permanently revoked a Bergen County psychiatrist’s license after he was convicted of illicitly prescribing the stimulant Adderall, prosecutors announced on Friday.

  • December 11, 2017

    DC Circ. Urged To Affirm FERC Has No Pro-Pipeline Bias

    The developers of the PennEast pipeline on Friday urged the D.C. Circuit to affirm that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's natural gas pipeline process isn't unconstitutionally biased in favor of industry, saying to accept an environmental group's argument otherwise would contradict a century's worth of due process legal theory.

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • December 8, 2017

    Hockey Teens Stick Del. Rink Operator With Toxic Fume Suit

    Two 13-year-old hockey players swung a lawsuit on Thursday against a skating club and a Zamboni repair business in New Jersey federal court over claims they suffered carbon monoxide poisoning when a defective vehicle was used to resurface ice during a tournament at the Delaware facility this year.

  • December 8, 2017

    NJ High Court OKs Roche's Bids To Review Accutane Rulings

    Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. has convinced the New Jersey Supreme Court to review two state appellate decisions related to the company's acne medication Accutane, with the justices agreeing to consider rulings over the adequacy of the drug's label and the admissibility of expert testimony.

  • December 8, 2017

    'Real Housewives' Star Hit With $30M Defamation Suit

    The former business partner of “Real Housewives of New Jersey” star Melissa Gorga has filed a $30 million defamation suit against Gorga, the show's executive producer Andy Cohen and NBC Universal, claiming they falsely accused her in public of stealing merchandise from the boutique she co-owned with Gorga.

  • December 8, 2017

    Cypriot Shipping Co. Seeks $5M Security During Arbitration

    A Cypriot charter shipping company asked a New Jersey federal court Thursday to allow it to access funds or property connected to a group of related agribusiness companies with operations in the U.S. and the United Arab Emirates that could provide it with security of more than $5 million while it pursues arbitration against the companies over an alleged contract breach.

  • December 8, 2017

    NJ Judge Accused Of Helping Fugitive Beau Must Face Trial

    The New Jersey Supreme Court has declined to review the case of a Superior Court judge criminally charged with hindering the apprehension of her boyfriend when he was wanted for armed robbery and ordered the jurist to go to trial, according to an order released Friday.

  • December 8, 2017

    State-Based Volvo Sunroof Classes Still Need Definition

    Drivers alleging Volvo Car Corp. sold vehicles with defective sunroofs must take another stab at getting their proposed state-based subclasses certified because they’re too poorly defined to meet the ascertainability requirement for the lawsuit to advance, a New Jersey federal judge said Wednesday.

  • December 7, 2017

    Eye Doc Blasts Feds' Loss Calculations Before Sentencing

    Counsel for a politically connected Florida ophthalmologist convicted of overbilling Medicare by $32 million urged a district court to toss the government's loss calculations Thursday as the sides made final arguments before sentencing, suggesting prosecutors have met the burden of proof for only $64,000 in false claims.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Things You Need To Know About Millennial Jurors

    Zachary Martin

    Millennials are now the largest living generation and comprise one-third of jurors. While it is impossible to generalize a group so large and diverse, trial lawyers should be mindful of certain generational differences, say baby boomer Lee Hollis and millennial Zachary Martin of Lightfoot Franklin & White LLC.

  • The Most Noteworthy Class Action Developments Of 2017

    Neal Marder

    This year has seen significant developments in the field of class action litigation. The impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Spokeo decision continued to work its way through the courts, the appeals courts have made strides on issues like ascertainability and standing to pursue injunctive relief, and Congress is considering legislation that would alter the class action landscape, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • A Look Back At Key 2017 Sports Cases — And What's Ahead

    Helen Maher

    There was no shortage of off-the-field drama in 2017, with athletes deciding they could no longer “stick to sports” and the federal government inserting itself into sports-related controversies. The outcome of four controversies in particular may have implications beyond the world of athletics, say attorneys with Boies Schiller Flexner LLP.

  • How DOE's 'Grid Resiliency' Policy May Impact Gas Markets

    Chip Moldenhauer

    At the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is soon expected to release an interim rule that subsidizes power plants that hold 90 days of fuel supply on site — i.e., coal-fired and nuclear plants — and effectively penalizes gas-fired plants. But FERC has an opportunity to mitigate the threat to gas-fired generators, says Chip Moldenhaeur of LawIQ.

  • The Intersection Of Arbitration And Choice-Of-Law Clauses

    Rachel Mongiello

    Clients on the verge of litigation with a contractual counterparty often furnish their attorneys with the negotiated contract containing a mandatory arbitration provision and choice-of-law clause. But an often overlooked question is whether the Federal Arbitration Act or the parties’ chosen law governs the arbitration itself, says Rachel Mongiello of Cole Schotz PC.

  • Plavix Ruling Raises Learned Intermediary Questions

    Stefanie Colella-Walsh

    A federal judge in New Jersey recently granted summary judgment to drug manufacturers in a lawsuit alleging that Plavix caused gastrointestinal bleeding. The multidistrict litigation court, sitting in New Jersey, applied California's learned intermediary doctrine, but may not have reached the same conclusion had it applied New Jersey law, say Stefanie Colella-Walsh and Martin Schrama of Stark & Stark.

  • Opinion

    We Need A Green Amendment

    Maya van Rossum

    Instead of pleading with lawmakers to do the right thing, constitutional amendments would elevate environmental rights to the status of our most cherished liberties, says Maya van Rossum, leader of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network and director of the Environmental Law Clinic at Temple’s Beasley School of Law.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Saris Reviews 'Locking Up Our Own'

    Judge Patti Saris

    Having just completed a six-year term as chair of the U.S. Sentencing Commission, I read Yale Law School professor James Forman's new book, "Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America," with particular interest, says Judge Patti Saris, chief judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

  • COPPA: The Latest Chapter In Consumer Class Actions

    Perrie Weiner

    Though the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act does not provide a private right of action, a recent spate of consumer class actions have attempted to use the law as a predicate for asserting violations of common law privacy-related torts and various state consumer protection statutes, say attorneys at DLA Piper LLP.

  • Why Asking About Salary History Is Risky Anywhere

    Joseph Kroeger

    Recently there has been significant attention around new laws and ordinances that prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their salary history in various U.S. states and cities. But are employers outside of these jurisdictions free to ask for salary history information of applicants without risk? Hardly, say Joseph Kroeger and Audrey Roberts of Snell & Wilmer LLP.