New York

  • September 23, 2020

    Feds Say Oil Trader's 'Token Of Appreciation' Was A Bribe

    A Texas oil trader was charged Tuesday in Brooklyn, New York, with paying $870,000 in bribes for his former firm, Vitol Group, to former officials at Ecuador's national petroleum concern — payments he allegedly called a "token of appreciation" for business including a $300 million fuel contract.

  • September 23, 2020

    Platinum Partners Co-Founder Wants $5M Bond Cut To $500K

    Platinum Partners co-founder Mark Nordlicht is asking a New York federal judge to soften his release conditions while prosecutors continue to appeal the judge's decision to grant Nordlicht a new trial on fraud charges.

  • September 23, 2020

    Giuliani Ally Can't Foot Legal Bills In Campaign Finance Case

    A Florida entrepreneur with business ties to Rudy Giuliani hasn't paid his attorneys at Goodwin Procter LLP and Marcus Neiman & Rashbaum LLP for defending him against campaign finance charges, a New York federal judge revealed Tuesday.

  • September 23, 2020

    Eric Trump Must Give Deposition Before Election, Judge Rules

    Eric Trump can't wait until after the November election to sit for a deposition in the state attorney general's office probe into whether President Donald Trump inflated the value of his assets, a New York judge ruled Wednesday.

  • September 23, 2020

    OneWeb Gets OK For Ch. 11 Plan Vote, $235M In Financing

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Wednesday sent OneWeb Global's $181 million equity-swap Chapter 11 plan to a creditor vote while approving $235 million in new financing that the satellite internet startup said will go toward restarting its launch program.

  • September 22, 2020

    Without Ginsburg, High Court May Still Keep ACA Intact

    The death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has ignited new fears that the sudden opening on the bench might lead to the end of the Affordable Care Act in a closely watched case before the high court, but experts cautioned that the health insurance law's fate is far from sealed.

  • September 22, 2020

    Art Foundation Tells Court To End 'LOVE' Sculptor Estate Row

    A New York federal court should pump the breaks on the winding and bitter battle over the work and legacy of the late sculptor Robert Indiana, known best for his "LOVE" image, an art foundation said Monday, saying it has reached an agreement with the artist's estate's beneficiary.

  • September 22, 2020

    Designer's Social Media Posts Infringed Photo, Judge Says

    A Manhattan federal judge is holding fashion designer Elie Tahari Ltd. liable for copyright infringement for posting a photographer's image to social media, rejecting the defense that sharing images online has become so "commonplace" that it didn't matter.

  • September 22, 2020

    Indian Oil Co. Says NY Fed Must Turn Over Yemen Bank Docs

    An Indian state-owned oil company is enlisting a New York court's help in tracking down assets to collect a five-year-old $3.8 million arbitral award against Yemen, saying the Federal Reserve Bank of New York needs to turn over information on accounts held by the country's central bank.

  • September 22, 2020

    Fla. Asphalt Co. To Pay $16.6M Over South American Bribes

    A Florida asphalt company will pay $16.6 million in connection with an agreement to plead guilty to paying bribes to state-owned oil companies in South America in exchange for access to government contracts, federal prosecutors in Brooklyn said Tuesday.

  • September 22, 2020

    Donziger Wants NY's High Court To Review Disbarment

    Chevron foe Steven Donziger is asking New York's highest court to review a decision to disbar him in the state, saying he was given no chance to defend himself against a federal court's finding that he committed fraud in a $9.5 billion environmental case in Ecuador.

  • September 22, 2020

    Chase Credit Card Servicers Escape Usury Suit in New York

    A federal judge in Buffalo threw out a suit accusing two non-bank entities associated with JPMorgan Chase Bank of violating a New York law capping the interest rates banks can lend at, finding that both the National Banking Act and guidance from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency supported dismissal of the matter.

  • September 22, 2020

    Equinox Trainer Accuses Gym Of Race, Sex Bias In Firing

    Fitness chain Equinox did nothing to stop a Black trainer from receiving racist and sexist remarks from a client and a co-worker at one of its New York City gyms and later fired her when she complained, the trainer said Tuesday in a lawsuit filed in New York federal court.

  • September 22, 2020

    2nd Circ. Vacates Ruling Blocking Indefinite Immigration Hold

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday vacated a ruling that a "special circumstance" exception could not be used to indefinitely hold a Palestinian man in immigration detention after he completed a prison sentence for providing material support to terrorists.

  • September 22, 2020

    Feds Take Bid To Cut Immigrants From Census To High Court

    The Trump administration pushed the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday for permission to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the census count for political redistricting, after a three-judge panel blocked the effort and found that the case was "not particularly close."

  • September 22, 2020

    2nd Circ. Upholds Conn. Doctor's Insider Trading Conviction

    A Second Circuit panel affirmed the insider trading conviction of a Connecticut cardiologist who traded on nonpublic drug trial information, holding on Tuesday that there was enough evidence to show he breached his duty to the drugmaker, Regado Biosciences Inc.

  • September 22, 2020

    Exec's Masturbation Session Cost Worker Her Job, Suit Says

    A New York investment bank that operated "like a boys' club" fired one of its few female employees shortly after she walked in on a top executive masturbating in a conference room and later complained about it, according to a new suit Tuesday.

  • September 22, 2020

    Printing Co. LSC Says It Needs Time To End Sale Objections

    Commercial printing company LSC Communications on Tuesday told a New York bankruptcy judge it may need just a few more days to reach an agreement with its unsecured creditors over its proposed sale to private equity firm Atlas Holdings LLC.

  • September 22, 2020

    Feds Win Order For NYC Suburb To Stop Polluting Rivers

    A federal judge on Tuesday ordered Mount Vernon, New York, to come into compliance with federal and state water pollution laws after finding the city has been illegally dumping raw sewage and other pollutants into two rivers that lead to New York City.

  • September 22, 2020

    Eatery's Challenge To Cuomo's 'Food Curfew' On Fast Track

    A federal judge on Tuesday ordered New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to quickly respond to a Brooklyn eatery's argument that the "coronavirus does not behave as a vampire, infecting others only when the moon is out," in a suit challenging his plan to close New York City for dining at midnight.

  • September 22, 2020

    Cornell Staves Off Trial With Deal In ERISA Suit

    Cornell University has agreed to wrap up a class action brought by workers who alleged they were saddled with high retirement plan fees and shoddy investment options, but an attorney for the workers vowed Tuesday to press the Second Circuit to revive the bulk of their case.

  • September 22, 2020

    Eric Trump Trying To Delay Testimony In Probe, NY AG Says

    Eric Trump shouldn't be allowed to delay testimony until after the election regarding whether President Donald Trump inflated the value of his assets, New York's attorney general told a state court Tuesday, arguing "dilatory conduct" shouldn't be rewarded.

  • September 22, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    As the stalemate over a new COVID-19 pandemic relief bill continues in the federal government, state lawmakers and leaders made progress over the past week with new measures to battle the health and financial fallout of the coronavirus.

  • September 22, 2020

    Feds Slam Regeneron's Attempt To Duck Kickback Suit

    The federal government has urged a Massachusetts federal judge not to toss its suit accusing Regeneron Pharmaceuticals of paying illegal kickbacks to get doctors to prescribe its injectable eye disease drug, arguing that the biotechnology company is using a "legally irrelevant" argument.

  • September 22, 2020

    Trustee Bristles At New $45M Purdue Bid For Ch. 11 Bonuses

    The Office of the United States Trustee objected Tuesday to a proposed $45 million Chapter 11 bonus plan from bankrupt painkiller maker Purdue Pharma, saying the company has already been approved to pay $38 million in retention and incentive bonuses to employees and the new plan doesn't contain meaningful benchmarks.

Expert Analysis

  • Remote Proceedings Bring New Wrinkles For Court Records

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    Parties and courts using remote videoconferencing should carefully consider how they will preserve a clear record of the proceedings, and the potential impact an official video record may have on appellate review, say Christopher Green and Sara Fish at Fish & Richardson.

  • DFS Case Shows Insurance Ramifications Of Cyber Breaches

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    The New York State Department of Financial Services' recent charges against First American regarding its cybersecurity failures is a warning that regulated companies should brace for potentially heightened enforcement activity and that even strong cybersecurity systems should be reinforced with insurance coverage, say Peter Halprin and Nicolas Pappas at Pasich.

  • Cross-Selling Strategies For Law Firms During Pandemic

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    Law firms can grow revenue during the COVID-19 crisis by facilitating communication among complementary practice groups, soliciting client feedback and engaging in other cross-selling activities that build on existing client bases, says consultant David Freeman.

  • Bias Ruling Spotlights Confusion Over Protected Categories

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    A New York federal court’s recent dismissal of a Caucasian Catholic worker’s racial and religious discrimination claims in Cocca-Rau v. Standard Insurance illustrates how employees may misunderstand protected categories under federal law, and how the confusion can result in unnecessary litigation, says Valerie Ferrier at Martin Clearwater.

  • Opinion

    COVID-19 Medical Malpractice Shield Laws Endanger Patients

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    Medical errors existed before COVID-19, as did laws to protect health care providers that made such errors — so recently enacted state and federal protections are unnecessary and threaten the safety of patients, says Kay Van Wey at Van Wey Presby.

  • Atty Media Interview Lessons From Trump's Axios Appearance

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    The recently broadcast interview of President Donald Trump with Axios political reporter Jonathan Swan provides a dramatic example of how not to answer media questions and presents four lessons to attorneys preparing for press coverage, says Michelle Calcote King at Reputation Ink.

  • 8th Circ. Ruling May Provide Relief For Bakken Debtors

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    The Eighth Circuit’s recent decision that an oil and gas agreement provision requiring additional funds to participate in drilling a well was dischargeable in Slawson Exploration v. Nine Point Energy may aid debtors in the Bakken shale at a time when bankruptcy filings are expected to rise, say Isaac Griesbaum and Katherine Preston at Winston & Strawn.

  • Why Remote Depositions Are Likely Here To Stay

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    As attorneys and their clients realize it is possible to conduct video depositions just as smoothly as in-person sessions while eliminating travel, catering and other costs, they will likely demand that remote procedures remain in place even after the pandemic is contained, says Darren Goldman at Becker & Poliakoff.

  • COVID-19 Bankruptcy Issues Complicate IP Contracts

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    As the pandemic will likely increase cases of financial distress, it is critical for companies to consider the potential impact of bankruptcy law as they deal with existing intellectual property contract rights and obligations, renewals, renegotiations or new contractual relations, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Recent Months Have Muddled COVID-19 Force Majeure Law

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    Courts have been inconsistent in deciding whether COVID-19 is a casualty or direct physical loss in force majeure contract disputes, and with no expected legislation to offer uniformity, contradictory rulings will likely continue, says Massimo D'Angelo at Adam Leitman.

  • Opinion

    Biden's Climate Plan Overlooks Powerful GHG Weapon

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    Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's climate change plan omits the idea of setting a national ambient air quality standard for greenhouse gases — a powerful solution available immediately under the Clean Air Act, and likely strengthened by the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Bostock decision, says attorney Michael Quirke.

  • 7 Keys To Drafting Effective Legal Briefs

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    Bo Pearl at Paul Hastings explains how eliminating clunky transitions, mixing in short sentences, and making a few other tweaks can increase the persuasive power of legal briefs.

  • Age Bias Ruling May Lower Bar For Other 'Sex-Plus' Claims

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    The Tenth Circuit’s recent decision allowing "sex-plus-age" employment discrimination claims under Title VII in Frappied v. Affinity Gaming could open the door to other sex-plus claims for nonprotected groups, and demonstrates the reach of the U.S. Supreme Court's Bostock ruling beyond LGBTQ rights, say Matt Cooper and Darin Smith at Squire Patton.

  • Autonomous Vehicles Need Federal Action To Move Forward

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    With the trajectory of the autonomous vehicle industry uncertain thanks to a patchwork of state laws, congressional action is necessary to provide regulatory clarity and establish a national framework for deployment, say Mark Raffman and Collin Grier at Goodwin.

  • Insurtech IPO Success Highlights Shifting Investor Priorities

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    Attorneys at Willkie examine the extent to which the success of Lemonade’s recent initial public offering is attributable to the online insurer’s status as a public benefit corporation in light of shifting public opinion on investing in line with the best interests of society at large.

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