New York

  • September 17, 2020

    LinkedIn, Zynga Founders' Blank-Check IPO Raises $600M

    LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman and Zynga founder Mark Pincus' blank-check company, Reinvent Technology Partners, went public Thursday after pricing a $600 million initial public offering steered by Skadden and Ropes & Gray.

  • September 17, 2020

    NY Files Charges Against J&J Over Opioid Marketing

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday said the state's financial services department had filed insurance fraud charges against Johnson & Johnson over opioid marketing that downplayed the risks of addiction. 

  • September 17, 2020

    Robbins Geller To Lead Investor Suit Against US Oil Fund

    Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP will lead a consolidated securities suit in New York federal court accusing the United States Oil Fund LP of misleading investors about the risks posed by "exceptional threats" like an oil price war between Russia and Saudi Arabia and the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • September 17, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Some of the nation's biggest banks want out of a lawsuit claiming they owe filing fees under the federal Paycheck Protection Program, a federal judge has struck down emergency restrictions put in place by Pennsylvania's governor, and LA Fitness and Ticketmaster are among the latest to escape some claims that they owe refunds over coronavirus-related cancellations. 

  • September 17, 2020

    Purdue Wants Opioid Suit Ch. 11 Shield Extended To March

    Purdue Pharma LP is asking a New York bankruptcy court to extend the injunction blocking thousands of suits against it over its role in the opioid crisis until March, saying that allowing the stay to expire in October would scuttle the progress it's made in its reorganization efforts.

  • September 17, 2020

    Cyber Fraud Prevention Co.'s Ex-CEO Charged In $123M Fraud

    The founder and former CEO of a Las Vegas cyber fraud prevention company is facing charges of securities and wire fraud for allegedly falsifying bank statements by up to $60 million at a time to spur investors into providing $123 million in two funding rounds, according to federal prosecutors.

  • September 17, 2020

    DC Circ. Temporarily Pauses EPA's Rollback Of Methane Regs

    The D.C. Circuit on Thursday temporarily paused the Trump administration's rollback of Obama-era regulations that clamped down on methane emissions from new and modified oil and gas operations.

  • September 17, 2020

    Eric Trump Wants Deposition Pushed Back To After Election

    Eric Trump told a New York court on Thursday he would sit for a deposition after the presidential election as part of the state attorney general's office probe into whether President Donald Trump inflated the value of his assets.

  • September 17, 2020

    SEC Says CCO Altered Reports To Mislead Agency Staff

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission fined a financial adviser and its chief compliance officer more than $1.7 million on Thursday for what the agency said was a failure to review the firm's accounts for excessive commissions and trading, in addition to the CCO's attempts to cover it up.

  • September 17, 2020

    Ethics Pitfalls Can Await Attys Who Don't Prep For Retirement

    The case of a New York attorney who recently told a court he kept practicing law after giving up his law license because he was "emotionally unable" to abandon his career highlights the need for lawyers to prepare for life after a legal career.

  • September 17, 2020

    Ex-JPMorgan Trader Gets 8 Months For Forex-Rigging

    A former JPMorgan Chase & Co. foreign currency trader convicted of conspiring to fix currency prices was sentenced to eight months in prison on Thursday.

  • September 17, 2020

    Sidley, Willkie Guide MetLife's $1.7B Deal For Versant

    MetLife said Thursday it will buy vision care company Versant in a roughly $1.7 billion bid to become one of the U.S.' largest vision insurers, a deal put together with help from Sidley Austin LLP and Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP.

  • September 17, 2020

    Judge OKs $187M Libor Deals But Calls $54M Atty Fee 'High'

    A Manhattan federal judge on Thursday approved $187 million of settlements between seven megabanks — including Deutsche Bank — and futures traders who say big banks rigged a global rate, but she indicated that a roughly $54 million fee request from plaintiffs' lawyers was too high.

  • September 17, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Korean Air Lines, Spirit Realty, Wafra

    Korean Air Lines is reportedly considering selling the Wilshire Grand Center in Los Angeles, Spirit Realty is said to have purchased several automotive properties in Florida for $48.5 million, and a Wafra Capital venture is reportedly on the hunt for $860 million in financing for a Wall Street office property.

  • September 17, 2020

    Homeowner Seeks $3M From Architect For Botched Redesign

    A homeowner on the Upper West Side of Manhattan sued her former architect for at least $3 million in New York state court after he allegedly failed to follow the design plans for multiple elements of a renovation project, charged her for the replacement work and caused delays.

  • September 17, 2020

    LATAM Seeks Court OK For Revised, $2.45B DIP Loan

    South American airline LATAM Airlines Group SA on Thursday put an amended, $2.45 billion debtor-in-possession financing package before a New York bankruptcy court after its earlier plan was rejected.

  • September 17, 2020

    Centric Brands OK'd For Ch. 11 Plan With $6M Creditor Deal

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Thursday approved Centric Brand's $700 million Chapter 11 plan after hearing the licensing company had struck a nearly $6 million deal to end objections and legal claims from its unsecured creditors.

  • September 16, 2020

    Judge Rips Prosecutors' Conduct In Iran Sanctions Case

    A Manhattan federal judge issued a blistering critique of prosecutors Wednesday for misleading the court about the disclosure of potentially exculpatory evidence in a case against a businessman accused of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran, ordering two Southern District of New York unit chiefs and all the line prosecutors in the case to answer questions under penalty of perjury.

  • September 16, 2020

    Dueling Defamation Suits Air Out NYC Gallery's Family Fued

    New York City's revered Marlborough Gallery hit its ex-president and his father with an $8 million fraud and defamation suit Tuesday, alleging they ran the art gallery into the ground by helping themselves to its collection and funds, but the former president countersued alleging a plot to wrest control of the gallery from his family.

  • September 16, 2020

    Allianz's Bad Bets Were 'Ticking Time Bomb,' $2B Suit Claims

    A Blue Cross Blue Shield employee benefits committee sued Allianz in New York federal court Wednesday, claiming the investment firm falsely touted a low-risk strategy when in reality it made bad bets that were a "ticking time bomb" and cost investors $2 billion during coronavirus-related market volatility.

  • September 16, 2020

    Fintech Co. Alloy Garners $40M In Series B Round

    Fintech customer identity verification startup Alloy announced Wednesday that it netted $40 million in a Series B funding round led by fintech-focused Canapi Ventures.

  • September 16, 2020

    Nixon Peabody Accused Of 'Punishing' Attys For Move To DLA

    Five former Nixon Peabody LLP partners say the firm is "punishing" them for leaving for DLA Piper last year by trying to claw back hundreds of thousands of dollars in earned bonuses and also by withholding wages, earned equity distributions and capital account funds, according to a petition lodged in New York state court Tuesday.

  • September 16, 2020

    SDNY Judge Says She's 'DONE' With Serenity, Ferring IP Case

    Manhattan's top federal judge on Wednesday rejected a request by Serenity Pharmaceuticals to amend a recent judgment in a patent case that went in favor of rival drugmaker Ferring Pharmaceuticals, with the seemingly exasperated judge saying she is "DONE" with the case.

  • September 16, 2020

    Insurer Off The Hook For Excluded Trampoline Injury

    A New York federal judge freed Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Co. from having to defend performing arts company Streb Inc. in an underlying suit brought by a student injured while using a trampoline, ruling Wednesday that the policy's aerial equipment exclusion bars coverage.

  • September 16, 2020

    DC Circ. Mulls Upending FAA's Move On Peak Newark Flights

    D.C. Circuit judges indicated Wednesday that Spirit Airlines' challenge to the Federal Aviation Administration's decision not to set aside peak-hour slots at Newark Liberty International Airport for the budget carrier may turn on whether the agency's move qualifies as a final decision that can be overturned.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    Most Courts Follow 1st Circ. Generic-Delay Ruling's Standard

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    Contrary to a recent Law360 guest article arguing that most courts have criticized or rejected the First Circuit's reversal of class certification in the 2018 Asacol pay-for-delay cases, most courts have in fact followed it, recognizing that precedent requires serious scrutiny of plaintiffs' proposed proof, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

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    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • Special Masters Can Ease COVID-19 Criminal Case Backlog

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    As courts resume criminal jury trials amid the pandemic, there are several ways special masters can assist overtaxed federal judges in efficiently and expeditiously navigating pretrial issues, say former Third Circuit Judge Thomas Vanaskie and Geoffrey Johnson at Stevens & Lee.

  • Employer Next Steps After Court Guts DOL Virus Leave Rule

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    Following a New York federal court’s decision Monday to invalidate parts of a U.S. Department of Labor rule limiting who can take paid sick or expanded family COVID-19 leave, employers may need to adjust determinations related to work availability, health care capabilities, intermittent leave and documentation, says Susan Harthill at Morgan Lewis.

  • Lessons From Novartis' $678M Speaker Program Settlement

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    Novartis' recent $678 million deal with the U.S. Department of Justice, settling allegations that the company's physician-led speaker programs violated the Anti-Kickback Statute, sheds light on arguably the highest-risk marketing practice in the life sciences industry and steps companies can take to avoid DOJ ire, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What A Biden Administration Could Mean For Employers

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    Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s labor and employment policy initiatives would strengthen unions and increase employer mandates, but some policies could benefit companies by creating broader workforce access and supporting retention of existing workers, says Anthony Oncidi at Proskauer.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

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    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Cos. Should Track Microplastic Research And Regulations

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    Microscopic plastic particles in the environment are a major emerging concern for regulators in the U.S. and internationally — and with the regulatory framework evolving concurrently with scientific research on health and environmental impacts, companies must monitor developments closely, say Tara Paul and Willis Hon at Nossaman.

  • Opinion

    Courts Are Right To Scrutinize Food Labeling Suits

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    While putative class action filings against the food and beverage industry over often baseless allegations around food labeling persist during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is fortunate that judges are dismissing many of these cases based on a lack of any plausible theory of deception, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Takeaways From NY's First Cybersecurity Enforcement Action

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    The recent action against First American Title Insurance Co. represents the New York State Department of Financial Services' first cybersecurity charges against a financial institution, and provides insights into the regulator's priorities and important compliance steps that organizations should consider, say William Ridgway and Peter Cheun at Skadden.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

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    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

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    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • Key Tax Considerations For Cos. With Remote Employees

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    As remote work continues due to COVID-19, businesses navigating complex tax jurisdiction questions should diligently maintain employee location records for nexus and apportionment purposes, and make sure to account for differing state withholding and sourcing rules, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • FIFA Ruling Brings New Risks For Development Bank Projects

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    After the Second Circuit's recent decision upholding FIFA officials' bribery convictions, foreign businesses with multilateral development bank-sponsored projects whose financing emanates from the U.S. must ensure they are not violating U.S. wire fraud statutes, even if commercial bribery is legal in the foreign country, says Joshua Ray at Rahman Ravelli.

  • Avoiding Workplace Violence When Customers Refuse Masks

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    Terri Solomon and Elizabeth Barrera at Littler address how businesses can avert violent situations when patrons refuse state and local face mask mandates by using signage, incident response plans and law enforcement assistance to meet federal workplace safety requirements.

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