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New York

  • June 14, 2018

    EPA To Move Forward With New Pesticide Training Protocol

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will officially announce the availability of expanded pesticide safety training materials in the Federal Register, ending its postponement of an Obama-era rule that required certain employers to provide updated training, the New York Attorney General’s Office announced Thursday.

  • June 14, 2018

    Norton Rose Picks Up New M&A, PE Partners In NY, Calif.

    Norton Rose Fulbright has strengthened its mergers and acquisitions and private equity offerings with the addition of partners to its offices in major cities on the East and West Coasts.

  • June 14, 2018

    NY Suit Against Trump May Open Door To Criminal Charges

    The language used in the New York State attorney general’s lawsuit accusing President Donald Trump of misusing tax-exempt charitable contributions for personal and political gain suggests criminal charges could follow if federal agencies find evidence of wrongdoing.

  • June 14, 2018

    ICE Says District Court Can't Pause Activist's Deportation

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has urged a New York federal judge to deny a bid by free speech advocate groups to stop removal proceedings against a prominent immigration activist, arguing that the REAL ID Act stripped district courts of the jurisdiction to halt deportations.

  • June 14, 2018

    Lebanese Bank Exits Shareholder Suit Over Terror Financing

    A Jordanian businessman who invested in the now-defunct Lebanese Canadian Bank can’t hold its former top brass accountable for human rights abuses under the Alien Tort Statute, a New York federal judge said Thursday, dismissing the derivative suit he brought on behalf of the bank for an alleged money laundering scheme orchestrated by its leaders.

  • June 14, 2018

    Man Sues 'Fox & Friends' Host After Being Hit by Ax On Set

    A man who was struck by an ax thrown by "Fox & Friends" co-host Pete Hegseth during an episode of the show has filed suit in New York state court against the network and the host, saying they negligently caused him injury.

  • June 14, 2018

    Katten Guides AIG Unit's $80M Hudson Yards Loan To Moinian

    Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP represented AIG subsidiary American General Life Insurance Co. in connection with its $80 million loan to Moinian Group for an office and retail tower project on 11th Avenue in Manhattan, according to records made public in New York on Thursday.

  • June 14, 2018

    Ex-Pitcher Strikes Out On 3rd Swing At MLB Defamation Suit

    A New York state judge has thrown out a former Cincinnati Reds draft pick's lawsuit accusing MLB of defamation and interfering with his baseball clinic, rejecting his third attempt to go after the league.

  • June 14, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: WeWork, Google, Robbins Property

    WeWork is reportedly leasing 60,000 square feet in New York, Google and Trammell Crow are said to have picked up three California parcels for $9.5 million, and Robbins Property has reportedly dropped $43 million on a Florida apartment complex.

  • June 14, 2018

    Swaps Exchange Accuses BofA, Goldman Of Illegal Boycott

    An electronic exchange for trading interest rate swaps filed suit on Thursday in New York federal court against an array of large financial institutions, including Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, Citigroup and Morgan Stanley, accusing them of illegally boycotting the exchange to eliminate competition in the interest rate swaps market and boost their own profits.

  • June 14, 2018

    'Buffalo Billion' Defense Denied Subpoena To Jailed Witness

    The Manhattan judge set to oversee the criminal trial of former State University of New York President Alain Kaloyeros and three other men accused of rigging bids in the state's so-called Buffalo Billion revitalization effort turned aside a defense subpoena Thursday that sought information about a jailed cooperating witness.

  • June 14, 2018

    MSD Capital Analyst's Conviction Is Fodder For Win, SEC Says

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is asking for a win in New York federal court against a former MSD Capital LP analyst convicted of insider trading in a parallel criminal proceeding, saying the guilty verdict has left him without a leg to stand on in the SEC's case.

  • June 14, 2018

    DOJ Wins 3-Month Deposition Stay In Forex Investor Suit

    A New York federal judge has ruled that several banking executives accused of rigging benchmark foreign exchange rates can't be deposed for investors' proposed class action for at least another three months, giving the U.S. Department of Justice more time to proceed with a criminal probe into the scheme before the bankers sit for interviews in the civil case. 

  • June 14, 2018

    Venable Nabs Ex-K&L Gates IP Pro In New York

    Venable LLP has added a former K&L Gates LLP partner with over 20 years of experience litigating and counseling on copyright, trademark and patent matters to its intellectual property transactions practice, the firm announced.

  • June 14, 2018

    SunEdison Investors Seek Class Cert. In Stock-Drop Suit

    Pension funds alleging bankrupt renewable energy developer SunEdison’s former executives and directors concealed liquidity and financing problems that ultimately caused share prices to drop asked a New York federal court Wednesday for class certification.

  • June 14, 2018

    NY AG Says Trump Used His Charity As Campaign Checkbook

    The New York state attorney general's office accused the Trump Foundation on Thursday of self-dealing in a suit seeking a ban on President Donald Trump from operating any Empire State nonprofit for 10 years, one-year bans for three of his children and $2.8 million of restitution.

  • June 13, 2018

    JPMorgan, ADR Holders Strike $9.5M Deal In Fee Suit

    JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s banking unit agreed to shell out $9.5 million to end a proposed class action by a group of American depositary receipt holders who’d alleged the bank improperly charged extra foreign exchange transaction fees, according to a deal pitched in New York federal court Tuesday.

  • June 13, 2018

    Ex-Dewey CFO Gets Discovery Stay For Criminal Appeal

    Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP's former chief financial officer, who was convicted of fraud, won a bid Tuesday to pause discovery in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s New York federal suit against him while his criminal case is still on appeal.

  • June 13, 2018

    American Airlines Union Collusion Claims Tossed In Ch. 11

    A New York bankruptcy court on Tuesday shut down a suit by disgruntled pilots accusing their union of dropping the ball and even outright colluding with American Airlines during a tangled arbitration fight, calling the pilots’ claims “doomed” and “without any basis whatsoever.”

  • June 13, 2018

    Ex-Morgan Stanley VP Made Hack-Based Trades, Plotter Says

    A onetime Georgia stock trader told a Brooklyn federal jury Wednesday that former Morgan Stanley Vice President Vitaly Korchevsky and ex-broker Vladislav Khalupsky traded on nonpublic information gleaned from hacked press releases as part of what prosecutors say was a $30 million fraud.

Expert Analysis

  • Check Yourself: Burberry And Target Square Off Over IP

    Eric Chadwick

    Burberry's lawsuit against Target alleging misappropriation of its check pattern trademarks will raise significant issues, including secondary meaning and the aesthetic functionality doctrine, say Eric Chadwick and Kyle Peterson of Patterson Thuente Pedersen​​​​​​​ PA.

  • Despite Legality, Employee Arbitration Pacts Are No Panacea

    Adam Primm

    While the U.S. Supreme Court's recent opinion in Epic Systems v. Lewis is clearly a business-friendly decision, employers should not rush to include arbitration agreements and class or collective action waivers in their employment contracts. They may be beneficial in certain contexts, but they are not necessarily a fit for everyone, say attorneys with Benesch Friedlander Coplan & Aronoff.

  • Guest Feature

    Dan Abrams Talks 'Lincoln's Last Trial' And Crime In Media

    Randy Maniloff

    Everything I saw through the glass walls of Dan Abrams’ office shouted new media. But after an hour with the ABC News chief legal affairs anchor, discussing his new book about Abraham Lincoln's career as a lawyer and a wealth of other topics, I came away realizing the secret of his success. And there’s nothing new about it at all, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • Why The 'Onionhead' Verdict May Make Employers Cry

    Barbara Hoey

    In U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. United Health Programs of America, a Brooklyn federal jury recently found that the company's use of a practice called “Onionhead” amounted to religious discrimination. Details from the case show employers how the EEOC and courts may treat religious discrimination claims going forward, say Barbara Hoey and Alyssa Smilowitz of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP.

  • Tax Days May Be Longer In Arizona Than New York

    Ariele Doolittle

    In New York, a "day" is defined as "any part of a day" for tax purposes. But, according to a state Supreme Court decision last week, a "day" may mean something different in Arizona. Ariele Doolittle of Hodgson Russ LLP analyzes the matter of BSI Holdings LLC v. Arizona Department of Transportation.

  • Opinion

    Why Widespread Use Of Live Video Testimony Is Not Justified

    Geoffrey Wyatt

    Despite the partiality some courts have shown to live video testimony, it provides no advantages — and several disadvantages — over the tried-and-true method of videotaped depositions, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Why Fossil Fuel Generation Facilities May Be Overvalued

    Mark Lansing

    As renewable energy and energy storage drive electricity prices down, generation revenues should further decline, which should lower the valuation of coal, nuclear and natural gas power plants. Yet assessments of fossil fuel generation assets have generally remained steady, suggesting they are being significantly overvalued, says Mark Lansing of Dickinson Wright PLLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wallach Reviews 'Uncivil Warriors'

    Judge Evan Wallach

    "Uncivil Warriors: The Lawyers' Civil War," by Peter Hoffer, is a new book about the involvement of lawyers on both sides in the American Civil War. The discussion is enlightening and often fascinating, but falls short in several key areas, says Federal Circuit Judge Evan Wallach.

  • States' Crypto Enforcement Onslaught Has Only Just Begun

    John Reed Stark

    It should come as no surprise that state securities administrators have boosted their cryptocurrency enforcement efforts. Because while cryptocurrency promoters can find easy prey in today’s excitable retail investor marketplace, initial coin offerings and digital trading platforms are also easy to surveil and easy to charge, says John Reed Stark of John Reed Stark Consulting LLC.

  • BigLaw Blogs In A Post-GDPR Marketing Universe

    Stephan Roussan

    Connecting with potential prospects is now more challenging due to the EU General Data Protection Regulation, meaning that law firm microsites, blogs and social media will become more valuable than ever. The firms that deploy them strategically will increase their relative visibility and accelerate the rebuilding of their opt-in distribution lists, says Stephan Roussan of ICVM Group.