New York

  • March 23, 2017

    Dewey Finance Staffer Says She Cooked The Books

    A former Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP finance department staffer told a Manhattan jury Thursday she improperly reversed accounting entries on the law firm’s books and lied to partners and others who questioned the suspect treatments.

  • March 23, 2017

    Court Says Netflix Must Pay Jones Day Rates In Dispute

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Wednesday ordered Netflix to pay an $800,000 legal bill for Relativity Media arising from a dispute over Netflix's efforts to stream two Relativity movies before they hit theaters, and also rebuked the streaming pioneer for its tactics regarding the bills for Jones Day fees.

  • March 23, 2017

    Seneca Say $115M Slot Share With NY State Will Be The Last

    The president of the Seneca Nation on Thursday said that the federally recognized tribe will no longer make payments of about $115 million a year to the state of New York under their tribal-state gambling compact, saying that the 2002 deal clearly called for an end to the payments after 14 years.

  • March 23, 2017

    Principal Life Loans $85M For Manhattan Building

    Principal Life Insurance Co. has provided $85 million in financing to Ormonde Equities LLC for an apartment building on Broadway in Manhattan, according to records made public Wednesday in New York.

  • March 23, 2017

    Cadwalader Guides Morgan Stanley's $205M NYC Loan

    Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft represented Morgan Stanley Mortgage Capital Holdings LLC in connection with its $205 million loan to an entity affiliated with real estate investor Savanna for an office building on William Street in Manhattan, according to records made public in New York on Wednesday.

  • March 23, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Credit Suisse, Pret A Manger, Shell

    Credit Suisse may sell more than $3 billion worth of stock in its Swiss business, private equity-backed sandwich chain Pret A Manger is readying for a New York IPO, and Royal Dutch Shell is in discussions to sell its last remaining asset in California.

  • March 23, 2017

    Fired NY Post Sports Columnist Drops Suit Over Trump Tweet

    A former sports columnist for the New York Post who said he was wrongfully fired for a personal tweet he sent comparing President Donald Trump's inauguration to Pearl Harbor and 9/11 has dropped his suit in New York State Supreme Court, after the paper moved to toss the allegations.

  • March 23, 2017

    2nd Circ. Looks Ready To Close Book On Newkirk And Maxim

    The Second Circuit looked ready Thursday to move on from former Bryan Cave LLP transactional attorney Harvey Newkirk's quest to exonerate himself after a jury convicted him of helping a client defraud lenders of $8 million as part of a failed ploy to acquire Maxim magazine.

  • March 23, 2017

    NYC Celeb Chefs Settle Trademark Beef Over 'Landmark'

    Celebrity chef Marc Murphy, the owner of upscale Manhattan restaurant Landmarc, has reached a settlement to drop a trademark lawsuit over plans for an eatery named “Landmark” at the nearby site of the old Four Seasons restaurant.

  • March 23, 2017

    Photographers Fight Fees After Contract Loss To AP, NFL

    Photographers whose claims against The Associated Press, the NFL and Replay Photos over royalties from their pictures were dismissed by a New York federal judge asked the court not to grant the attorneys' fee requests put forth by the defendants, arguing Wednesday that their case wasn’t objectively unreasonable.

  • March 23, 2017

    Drivers Say GM Can't Exclude Valukas Report Facts In Trials

    Drivers in multidistrict litigation over GM’s alleged ignition switch defect slammed the automaker's bid to exclude from upcoming trials a set of admissions made to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the key investigatory “Valukas report,” saying Wednesday that such a move would break with prior rulings and that the evidence is critically relevant.

  • March 23, 2017

    LNG Supplier Says Tribunal Ignored Nothing In Contract Row

    A Trinidadian liquefied natural gas supplier told a New York federal judge Tuesday that it prevailed in arbitration with a Spanish customer fair and square, blasting the customer's assertions of an improper burden of proof imposed by the international tribunal and pushing for award confirmation.

  • March 23, 2017

    MF Global, PwC Settle $2B Malpractice Claim

    MF Global and PricewaterhouseCoopers have settled a $2 billion professional malpractice case in New York federal court to the "mutual satisfaction of the parties," the litigants said Thursday.

  • March 22, 2017

    Exxon Ordered To Turn Over Execs' Climate Change Docs

    The New York judge overseeing a climate change-related probe of Exxon Mobil Corp. on Wednesday ordered the oil giant to produce documents from top executives to the New York attorney general by the end of the month, and directed further talks about recovering missing emails from an alias account of its recently departed CEO, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

  • March 22, 2017

    NY Data Breaches Soared To Record Levels In 2016, AG Says

    Fueled by hacks and employee negligence, reports of data security breaches impacting New York state residents jumped by 60 percent to hit an all-time high in 2016, with businesses disclosing nearly 1,300 incidents that compromised 1.6 million residents’ financial and other personal data, the state’s attorney general said Tuesday.

  • March 22, 2017

    Rodale Settles Copyright Row With Dad Who Streamed Birth

    Publishing giant Rodale Inc. has struck a confidential settlement with a California man who filed copyright infringement claims after the company used video footage he inadvertently posted on Facebook of his son’s birth, according to a filing in New York federal court Wednesday.

  • March 22, 2017

    'Spa Castle’ In Hot Water With NY AG Over $1.5M Unpaid Tax

    A massive spa complex in Queens, New York, and its owners and operators face 11 felony counts of tax fraud and theft after Attorney General Eric Schneiderman accused them on Wednesday of dodging $1.5 million in taxes by dealing in cash and underreporting revenues from 2010 to 2013.

  • March 22, 2017

    Walters Jury Hears 'Bat Phone' For Prostitutes, Not Trades

    A defense team seeking to clear gambler Billy Walters of insider trading began a no-holds-barred cross-examination Wednesday of former Dean Foods chair Tom Davis, showing a Manhattan federal jury records of calls the star government witness made to escort services across the country.

  • March 22, 2017

    Drug Cos. Fight Bid For Quick Win In Namenda Antitrust Suit

    An Allergan PLC unit asked a New York federal judge to deny drug wholesalers’ bid for a win on a federal antitrust claim in their lawsuit over the Alzheimer’s treatment Namenda, arguing Tuesday that findings from a previously litigated case have nothing to do with the matter at hand. 

  • March 22, 2017

    Nursing Home Subcontracted To Skirt Union, NLRB Says

    The National Labor Relations Board let stand Tuesday a ruling that a New York nursing home illegally fired certain union supporters, subcontracted work to avoid having to collectively bargain with an SEIU local the provider did not want to recognize, and steered support toward a preferred union.

Expert Analysis

  • NY High Court Expands Protections For Financial Traders

    David Parker

    The New York high court’s decision in Stonehill Capital Management v. Bank of the West clarifies the extent to which an agreement to buy or sell a financial instrument for which additional written documentation is expected may be enforceable. The decision should give comfort to participants in markets where trading via telephone or other informal means is common, say David Parker and Joshua Bromberg of Kleinberg Kaplan Wolff & Cohen PC.

  • The Loss Of Confidentiality In NY Arbitral Enforcement Cases

    Jonathan J. Tompkins

    A sobering series of decisions from New York federal courts has made clear that the valued benefits of confidentiality attendant to arbitration will almost assuredly be rendered ineffectual if and when recognition and enforcement is sought in New York, says Jonathan Tompkins of Shearman & Sterling LLP.

  • What Lawyers Can Learn From Kellyanne Conway

    Michelle Samuels

    Presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway's TV appearances provide some examples of what lawyers should and shouldn't do when speaking to the media, says Michelle Samuels, a vice president of public relations at Jaffe.

  • How States Might Challenge The OCC's Fintech Charter

    Brian G. Barrett

    Some state banking regulators see the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's plan to create a new charter for financial technology companies as a direct threat to their existing authority. Litigation challenging the preemptive effect of the fintech charter would likely involve an interpretation of the limitations on the OCC’s statutory preemptive power, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP.

  • Latest Twist In The Merger Objection Lawsuit Saga

    Kevin M. LaCroix

    A New York appellate court’s recent decision in Gordon v. Verizon presents a number of important suggestions on the future direction of merger objection lawsuits, and raises the question of whether New York will become an attractive forum for such cases, says Kevin LaCroix of RT ProExec.

  • The Mistakes Lawyers Make When Copying And Pasting

    Robert D. Lang

    We all recognize that cutting or copying text from earlier works and pasting it into new documents saves attorneys time. However, with this increase in speed comes an increased risk of making, or not catching, errors, says Robert Lang of D’Amato & Lynch LLP.

  • Opinion

    Calif. Court Gets Automatic Funding Disclosure Right

    Matthew D. Harrison

    Detractors of litigation funding have strained to characterize a recent decision from a California federal court as significant headway in their crusade against the litigation funding industry. However, in truth, this is a victory for both the industry and those in need of capital to bring meritorious claims against wrongdoers in an often prohibitively expensive legal system, say Matthew Harrison and Priya G. Pai of Bentham IMF.

  • Weekly Column

    Talking 'Bull': Episode 15, What’s Your Number?

    Roy Futterman

    In this weekly column, real-life New York City jury consultant and psychologist Roy Futterman parses fact from fiction in "Bull," the new TV series airing on CBS about a fictional NYC jury consultant/psychologist. Spoiler alert ...

  • Benefits Of Bringing Fraudulent Conveyance Actions In NY

    Dale A. Schreiber

    In the forthcoming Trumpian era of expected higher inflation and interest rates, insolvencies of highly leveraged public companies and large privately held concerns will likely increase exponentially. In scenarios involving limited liability entities organized or with principal places of business in New York, the New York Fraudulent Conveyance Act offers a uniquely creditor-friendly tool, say Dale Schreiber and Margaret Dale of Pro... (continued)

  • Legal Pot Industry Bugged By Lack Of Pesticide Guidance

    Telisport W. Putsavage

    Marijuana cultivation suffers from the same pest and disease pressure as any large commercial greenhouse operation. However, the circumstance unique to this setting is that any use of a pesticide in the cultivation of marijuana is a violation of federal law, says Telisport Putsavage of Putsavage PLLC.