New York

  • May 24, 2022

    'Lottery Lawyer' Pal Pleads Out As Severance Bids Renewed

    A purported co-conspirator of "Lottery Lawyer" Jason Kurland on Tuesday pled guilty to fraud and other charges over a pair of alleged schemes to siphon tens of millions of dollars from lottery winners and an extortion plot, while Kurland and an accused Genovese crime family soldier renewed their push for separate trials.

  • May 24, 2022

    Albany Diocese Lost Hospital Retirees' Benefits, NY AG Says

    The New York Attorney General's Office on Tuesday said the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany shirked its duty to protect and preserve the retirement fund of more than 1,000 former St. Clare's Hospital employees, who were stripped of their pension benefits.

  • May 24, 2022

    Trans Employee Wants Job At Dell Back After Arbitration Win

    A former Dell Technologies employee who was fired while undergoing gender transition surgery has asked a New York federal judge to force Dell to reinstate her.

  • May 24, 2022

    2nd Circ. Case's Relevance Disputed In $1.4B Award Fight

    Luxembourg-based steelmaker ArcelorMittal on Monday rebutted arguments by Essar Group that a recent Second Circuit decision sending a dispute over a canceled $1.1 billion power plant project to Angola supports the Indian conglomerate's bid to toss litigation filed by the steelmaker to enforce a $1.4 billion arbitral award.

  • May 24, 2022

    SEC Urges High Court Not To Hear 'Gag Order' Dispute

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission urged the Supreme Court not to hear the case of an ex-Xerox executive who is challenging a nearly two-decade-old settlement barring him from ever publicly denying the allegations against him.

  • May 24, 2022

    Pay Consultant Traded On Client's Sanofi Intel, Feds Say

    A California executive compensation consultant has been charged with insider trading for bets he made on a biopharmaceutical client right before it was acquired by Sanofi SA, federal prosecutors in New York announced Tuesday.

  • May 24, 2022

    Sale Of Judy Garland's Lost 'Wizard Of Oz' Dress Blocked

    A New York federal judge on Monday halted any sale or auction of a blue-and-white gingham dress worn by Judy Garland in the 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz" — lost for decades until its rediscovery last year — until the famous frock's rightful heir is determined in court.

  • May 24, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Sterling, ESI Ventures, Life Storage

    Sterling Organization has reportedly paid $37.4 million for a South Florida retail center, ESI Ventures is said to have landed $43.5 million in financing for an Arizona hotel, and Life Storage has reportedly paid $23.39 million for a South Florida self-storage property.

  • May 24, 2022

    Durbin Rejects GOP Call For 2nd Hearing On NY Court Pick

    Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the Judiciary Committee chairman, rejected a request from Republican senators to hold a rare second hearing for a New York trial court nominee.

  • May 24, 2022

    2nd Circ. Backs Stock Suit Over SEC Probe Into Tobacco Co.

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday revived claims from stockholders that a company working to genetically engineer tobacco and cannabis failed to disclose a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation, leading to a stock drop when it came to light.

  • May 24, 2022

    Ex-Celtic Davis Has 'Fouled Out,' Judge Says In Bail Review

    A Manhattan federal judge on Tuesday scolded retired Boston Celtics center Glen "Big Baby" Davis for repeatedly violating his bail conditions in the $4 million NBA health plan fraud case, threatening him with pretrial detention if he commits another "foul."

  • May 24, 2022

    ICE, Immigrants Agree On Fees To End Suit Over Wait Times

    The federal government and a class of immigrants reached a settlement on attorney fees after a district court found that excessive wait times for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement proceedings are unconstitutional.

  • May 24, 2022

    Investor Challenges $7.3B Merger Of Satellite Providers

    A Viasat Inc. shareholder sued in New York federal court Tuesday to block the global satellite provider's $7.3 billion plan to purchase rival Inmarsat, alleging that Viasat and its board of directors omitted financial projections from a securities filing related to the proposed merger.

  • May 24, 2022

    Week In Bankruptcy: Dioceses Settle; Wind-Downs Reined In?

    Three Roman Catholic dioceses are pushing for approvals of settlements for hundreds of sexual abuse claims in bankruptcy courts, a Delaware state court judge denied a litigation stay in a nonbankruptcy wind-down case, potentially signaling a crackdown, and Purdue Pharma executives got their bonuses approved. This is the week in bankruptcy.

  • May 24, 2022

    Ford Inks $19.2M Deal To End States' False Ad Claims

    Ford Motor Co. agreed to pay $19.2 million in a multistate settlement to end allegations that it misled consumers about the fuel efficiency of a hybrid car model and the hauling capabilities of its heavy-duty truck line, several state attorneys general announced Tuesday.

  • May 24, 2022

    'We Build The Wall' Fraud Defendant Tells Jury Work Was Legit

    A Colorado real estate agent who hawks Donald Trump-themed energy drinks online denied Tuesday that he helped loot a fundraising effort to wall off the United States from Mexico, telling a Manhattan federal jury that the effort was aboveboard.

  • May 24, 2022

    $14M Deal Reached In Oil Co. Stock Fraud Class Action

    A class of Dakota Plains Holdings Inc. investors asked a New York federal judge on Monday to give the first green light to a nearly $14 million settlement they reached with the defunct oil transloading company's officers and directors over a purported stock manipulation scheme.

  • May 24, 2022

    Another Columbia Care Shareholder Sues To Block $2B Sale

    Another Columbia Care Inc. shareholder is suing the cannabis company and its board to block a $2 billion sale to Cresco Labs, saying the board has failed to disclose several pieces of financial information related to the merger.

  • May 24, 2022

    Sidley, Cannon Heyman Guide $167M NYC Multifamily Loan

    Sidley Austin represented Silver Point Capital in connection with its roughly $167 million loan to Cannon Heyman-counseled real estate firm Lam Group for a Manhattan rental apartment building, according to records made public in New York on Tuesday.

  • May 24, 2022

    Ex-SDNY Prosecutor From Boies Schiller Jumps To MoFo

    Morrison Foerster LLP has added a securities litigation and white collar defense partner from Boies Schiller Flexner LLP in New York, the firm announced Tuesday, responding to what it said was booming demand for investigations and litigation work.

  • May 24, 2022

    Nationstar Settles Suit Alleging Unauthorized Payments

    Nationstar Mortgage LLC has settled a proposed class action that accused the company of debiting thousands of dollars in unauthorized mortgage payments from customers' bank accounts several times in one month.

  • May 24, 2022

    Xerox Urges Court To Shrink Proposed ERISA Class

    Xerox told a New York federal court that a former employee's 900-member proposed class largely encompasses workers whose benefits were unaffected by an early retirement plan and that it should be reduced to include only a younger set of employees.

  • May 24, 2022

    Angelo Gordon Seals Second Distressed Credit Fund At $3.1B

    Angelo Gordon & Co. LP, a credit- and real estate-focused investment firm, said Tuesday it has clinched its second credit fund for investing in distressed companies in need of financial support at $3.1 billion, just above the vehicle's target.

  • May 23, 2022

    Former Art Dealer Gets 7 Years For $86M Fraud

    A New York federal judge on Monday sentenced an art dealer with galleries in London and Miami to seven years in prison over a yearslong $86 million scheme to deceive art collectors, investors and lenders in order to keep his business afloat.

  • May 23, 2022

    NY Lawmakers Grant 1-Year Grace Period For Sex Abuse Suits

    The New York Assembly on Monday passed the Adult Survivors Act, which, if signed by the governor, would open up sexual assault and abuse litigation by creating a one-year window for adult survivors whose claims are otherwise time-barred.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At The Legal Profession Since Murder Of George Floyd

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    Little has changed for Black attorneys since law firms promised to combat discrimination within the profession following George Floyd's murder, but on this second anniversary of his death, law firms can recommit by adopting specific strategies that set their Black lawyers up for success, say Lisa Davis and Khasim Lockhart at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Opinion

    NY Ruling Correctly Deems Legal Finance Docs Irrelevant

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    A New York appeals court's recent decision in Worldview Entertainment v. Woodrow joins a growing trend of decisions denying discovery of litigation funding documents, highlighting that commercial legal finance should be treated just like any other financing in commercial litigation, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Perspectives

    We Can't Rely On Lawyers For Every Justice Need

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    The Southern District of New York, which recently heard arguments in Upsolve and John Udo-Okon v. New York, has the opportunity to increase access to justice by allowing nonlawyers to provide legal help, shifting the focus from credentials to substantive outcomes, says Rebecca Sandefur at Arizona State University.

  • Worker Migration Calls For Fla., NY Employment Law Review

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    Newly remote employees who left New York for Florida during the pandemic should consider the applicable state noncompete laws, because restrictive covenants in employment agreements can seriously affect an employee's post-termination options, say Yaniv Adar and Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Employer Travel Benefits Options For Abortion Care Post-Roe

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    Given the likelihood that Roe v. Wade will be overturned, and with the proliferation of state legislation restricting abortion access, employers may want to consider the legal implications of several options to expand travel reimbursement benefits for employees who seek abortion services, say Danita Merlau and Ben Conley at Seyfarth.

  • New Ariz. Cyberattack Info Sharing May Be Worth The Burden

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    A recent amendment to Arizona’s data breach notification law, and similar state and federal cyber incident reporting rules, significantly burden companies that are attacked, but increased information sharing could help prevent and mitigate the damage from future data security incidents, say Christine Czuprynski and Kate Jarrett at McDonald Hopkins.

  • Opinion

    More Regulation Is Needed In US Fertility Industry

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    Though states have made some progress in recent years, the U.S. fertility industry remains plagued by widespread fraud and legal loopholes that must be addressed with legislation to bolster protections for patients and children conceived through reproductive technology, says Rachel Wexler at Trachman Law Center.

  • Overcommunicate With Your Summer Associates This Year

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    2022 summer associates have had limited opportunities for professional interactions due to the pandemic, so supervising attorneys should prioritize intentional overcommunication by emphasizing importance of tone and content of emails, sharing feedback immediately, and more, says Julie Schrager at Faegre Drinker.

  • Complying With Electronic Monitoring Laws In NY And Beyond

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    New York's recently effective requirement to alert employees of computer surveillance practices is part of a wider trend of workplace privacy laws at the state and local level, and should prompt employers to closely track their local laws, and update their policies and employee acknowledgement forms, say Harris Mufson and Lizzy Brilliant at Gibson Dunn.

  • Nev. Case Highlights Settlement Authority Dilemmas For Cos.

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    A Nevada federal court's recent decision in Ceja v. The Vons Companies illustrates the pitfalls of misinterpreting a court order requiring a representative with full settlement authority to be present at negotiations, and is a reminder to consider that courts differ as to what full settlement authority means in practice, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Opinion

    2nd Circ. Reasoning In COVID Force Majeure Case Is Flawed

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    The Second Circuit's recent holding in JN Contemporary Art v. Phillips Auctioneers, that a force majeure clause permitted an auction house to cancel a contract because of COVID-19, was correctly decided, but for the wrong reasons, because the decision incorrectly characterized the operative clause as a catchall clause, says Joshua Wurtzel at Schlam Stone.

  • 2nd Circ. Appears Open To Post-Judgment Section 1782 Use

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    The recent decision in Nigeria v. VR Advisory Services signals a shift in Second Circuit case law that adds further support for litigants' use of international discovery statute Section 1782 for post-judgment proceedings, providing a powerful tool to judgment creditors, says Jeff Newton at Omni Bridgeway.

  • #MeToo And The Workplace: 5 Years And A Pandemic Later

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    As the fifth anniversary of the #MeToo movement approaches and the pandemic wanes, it is a prime time to evaluate the impact of the movement and how employers can continue to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, say Kelly Cardin and Evan Citron at Ogletree.

  • Expect More Web Accessibility Claims, Despite DOJ Guidance

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    Plaintiff lawsuits on website accessibility have continued despite long-awaited guidance from the U.S. Department of Justice, and with court activity resulting in some circuit splits, businesses should not expect the current climate to dramatically change any time soon, say Shira Blank and Joshua Stein at Epstein Becker.

  • 2 Approaches To NY Choice Of Law In Employment Contracts

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    Two differing New York federal court decisions on restrictive covenants should be taken into account by employers and employees arguing for or against the application of a choice-of-law provision in New York courts, say John Chun and Silvia Stockman at Herrick Feinstein.

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