Pennsylvania

  • August 15, 2017

    Immigrant Unrecognized By Sierra Leone Fights Detention

    A Sierra Leone native whom the federal government has failed to deport to the west African country sought Monday to be released from detention in Pennsylvania, arguing that there is no realistic prospect that the U.S. will succeed in removing him.

  • August 15, 2017

    Ethics Court Urged To Put Pa. Judge On Hook For Retaliation

    For the first time since a sweeping new set of judicial ethics rules went into effect three years ago, the Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline is being urged by an ethics watchdog to find an ex-Northampton County judge liable for retaliating against staffers who complained about his purportedly abusive conduct.

  • August 15, 2017

    3rd Circ. Denies NJ Town's Bid To Stay Dune Construction

    The Third Circuit on Tuesday refused a New Jersey beachfront town’s urgent request to temporarily halt a federally funded dune construction project so authorities can address the pools of contaminated water that the work has apparently produced, and left open the question of whether a district judge’s order greenlighting the project can even be appealed. 

  • August 15, 2017

    Pa. Fraudster Wins New Look At Ineffective Counsel Claims

    The Third Circuit on Tuesday found that a Pennsylvania federal judge erred by not looking further into a convicted fraudster's assertions that his lawyer’s omissions led him to turn down a five-year plea deal, and sent the case back for an evidentiary hearing.

  • August 15, 2017

    Egg Producers Lose Bid To Decertify Class In Price-Fix MDL

    Egg producers on Monday lost in their effort to unravel the certification of a class of direct egg purchasers accusing them of participating in a price-fixing conspiracy, with a Pennsylvania federal judge saying that the companies were mostly rehashing old battles.

  • August 15, 2017

    Pa. Rep., Atty Cop To Roles In Illegal Gambling Scheme

    A Pennsylvania state representative and an attorney on Tuesday both pled guilty to state misdemeanor charges stemming from allegations that they took steps to support an Allegheny County illegal gambling ring.

  • August 14, 2017

    Extension Option Can't Trigger Lease Tax, Pa. Court Says

    A Pennsylvania appellate court tossed the commonwealth’s attempt to apply a realty transfer tax to a company holding a long-term lease in the state, ruling Monday that the lease’s extension doesn’t push it beyond a 30-year limit on untaxable leases.

  • August 14, 2017

    3rd Circ. Urged To Mull FCA Triggers In Pa. Grant Row

    Weighing in on appeal after the city of Pittsburgh dodged allegations that it filed fraudulent claims for grant funds, the federal government has urged the Third Circuit to interpret a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling to rethink when false certifications of regulatory compliance can trigger False Claims Act liability.

  • August 14, 2017

    Obermayer Adds Energy Title Partner In Pittsburgh

    Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP announced Monday that it had landed a former Jackson Kelly PLLC member who specializes in title work to its Pittsburgh office in order to boost its capabilities in energy-related transactions.

  • August 14, 2017

    Philly, Business District Say Residents Can't Sue Over Tax

    Philadelphia and its Center City District on Friday asked a state court judge to throw out a putative class action challenging a tax that supports the special services provided by the CCD, as the latter group defended its authority to establish procedures governing the levy.

  • August 14, 2017

    Pa. Judge Explains Call To Keep $2.5M J&J Risperdal Verdict

    A Pennsylvania state judge has explained his reason for denying a Johnson & Johnson unit’s request for a new trial over abnormal breast growth allegedly linked to the drug Risperdal, saying the company's “extraordinary” defense tactics warranted allowing an Alabama boy’s family to find a new expert witness during the case.

  • August 14, 2017

    Temple Univ., Feds Sued Over Infant's Neurological Injuries

    A Philadelphia family has filed suit in federal court against Temple University Hospital and the federal government, which employs the hospital’s personnel, claiming that doctors bungled a delivery and left the baby with serious neurological damage.

  • August 11, 2017

    Auto Salvage Co. Gets OK To Start Paying $26.7M Settlement

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Thursday ordered an auto salvage company to pay $16.5 million of a $26.7 million settlement it reached with a metals trader over precious metals lease agreements, leaving an amount that matches what one of the salvage company shareholders owes a South African metals refiner in a separate dispute over an arbitral award.

  • August 11, 2017

    Atty Says Immigration Courts Unfairly Applied Suspension

    An attorney sued the Executive Office for Immigration Review and several other arms of the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in New Jersey federal court on Friday, alleging that he has been unfairly suspended from practicing immigration law based on an expired reciprocal suspension in Pennsylvania.

  • August 11, 2017

    Insurer Needn't Cover Ex-Patients Who Set Fire In Building

    Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Co. should be let off the hook for damages resulting from two mentally ill patients of a nonprofit it insured that set fire to their own apartments, a Pennsylvania federal court recommended Thursday, as it shot down arguments to the contrary by the apartment building’s insurer.

  • August 11, 2017

    BofA Merger Settlement Administrator Can’t Beat Fraud Suit

    An accounting firm that was sued after it gave $6 million in settlement funds meant for Bank of America Corp. investors to a fraudster had two potential defenses spiked by a Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday, with the court saying the suit against Heffler Radetich & Saitta LLP couldn’t be stopped by procedural stumbling blocks.

  • August 11, 2017

    3rd Circ. Says US Marshals Not Employer In Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit affirmed dismissal Friday of a suit alleging the U.S. Marshals Service violated Title VII by failing a job applicant on her background check because of a suit her friend filed five years earlier, saying the applicant applied for a job with a contractor that works with the Marshals and not the service itself.

  • August 11, 2017

    NJ Sierra Club Blasts PennEast For Pipeline Approval Push

    The New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club on Friday blasted a bid by PennEast Pipeline Co. LLC to promptly advance its $1 billion natural gas pipeline project running from Pennsylvania to New Jersey, urging the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to follow the lead of state environmental regulators and flat-out deny the company's permit application.

  • August 11, 2017

    Convicted Reading Politico Can't Be Sprung Early, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors who are leading the corruption case against the former mayor of Reading, Pennsylvania, on Friday blasted a bid by the former city council president to cut short his time behind bars, rejecting his claims to have cooperated with the government.

  • August 11, 2017

    2 PE-Backed Energy Cos. File IPOs Totaling $200M

    Preferred Sands Inc., a KKR & Co. LP-backed supplier of fracking sand to oil and gas companies, on Thursday filed a preliminary $100 million initial public offering, making it the second energy-related issuer to join the IPO pipeline over the past week, preceded by oil field services company Quintana Energy Services Inc.

Expert Analysis

  • Cybersecurity Risks In The Courtroom

    Daniel Garrie

    As cybercriminals continue to look for easy targets, the court system will surely enter their crosshairs. If judges and court personnel do not maintain proper data security and cyber hygiene, confidential litigant information can fall into the hands of a wide variety of bad actors, say Daniel Garrie of JAMS, David Cass of IBM Cloud, Joey Johnson of Premise Health Inc. and Richard Rushing of Motorola Mobility LLC.

  • Monthly Column

    Gray Matters: Clients Are Not Really 'Emotional'

    Gray Matters

    When you look at your client through the "survival circuit" lens, what first appeared as an emotional mess is now valuable information about what is important to them, what needs have to be met to settle the case, or what further clarity your client requires before moving forward, say dispute resolution experts Selina Shultz and Robert Creo.

  • Valley Forge V. Upper Merion Is A Solid Win For Taxpayers

    Jeffrey Wilhelm

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's decision in Valley Forge v. Upper Merion this month is one of the state's most important real estate tax assessment cases to issue within the last two decades, providing taxpayers with important constitutional defenses against unscrupulous practices of taxing jurisdictions, says Jeffrey Wilhelm of Reed Smith LLP.

  • Having A Chief Privacy Officer Reassures Your Firm's Clients

    Rita Heimes

    When a law firm appoints a chief privacy officer, not only does the firm benefit from the crucial operational impact of a well-managed privacy program, but clients see how seriously you take your duties of confidentiality and competence, says Rita Heimes, research director at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

  • Some Needed Certainty On Administrative Expense Status

    Mark Sherrill

    Debtors in bankruptcy have often used the ambiguity surrounding the meaning of the word “received” as a tool to fight against administrative expense claims. Earlier this month, the Third Circuit issued an opinion in the case of World Imports that will likely be highly influential on this matter, says Mark Sherrill of Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Weekly Column

    Innovating For Wise Juries: Discussions Before Deliberations

    Richard Lorren Jolly

    To be sure, allowing jurors to discuss evidence before final deliberations proved to be among the least popular of our recommended innovations. But empirical evidence belies these fears, say Stephen Susman, Richard Lorren Jolly and Dr. Roy Futterman of the NYU School of Law Civil Jury Project.

  • 5 Questions Firms Should Ask When Evaluating Litigation AFA

    Gregory Lantier

    Law firm management should understand the client’s reasons for requesting an alternative fee arrangement, and whether approving the fee will help grow the relationship with the client, say attorneys with WilmerHale.

  • For Law Firm Offices, Business Savvy Is The New Cool

    Craig Braham

    Having embraced the notion that the right space can reinforce the right firm culture, law firm leaders have been evaluating real estate primarily for its physical properties. However, it's hard to be collegial, even in the coolest of in-house coffee bars, if your cost structure is untenable, says Craig Braham of Advocate Commercial Real Estate Advisors LLC.

  • Planning A Legal Career With A Future Relocation In Mind

    Jacqueline Bokser LeFebvre

    Lawyers move to New York City to work on some of the most sophisticated work the legal market has to offer. This exposure and experience is an amazing asset and many of the skills developed will make associates very marketable in the event they consider relocating to another market. However, this isn’t always the case, says Jacqueline Bokser LeFebvre of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • 4 Female Perspectives On BigLaw Leadership

    Regina Pisa

    Only a handful of the largest U.S. law firms are led by women. Here, in their own words, are perspectives from Shook Hardy & Bacon Chair Madeleine McDonough, Crowell & Moring Chair Angela Styles, Morgan Lewis & Bockius Chair Jami Wintz McKeon and Goodwin Procter Chair Emeritus Regina Pisa.