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Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • June 28, 2017

    House Passes Tort Reform Bill To Cap Med Mal Damages

    In a razor-thin vote, the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday approved a tort reform bill that would impose a nationwide cap on noneconomic damages in medical malpractice cases and would institute several other measures purportedly designed to lower health care costs.

  • June 28, 2017

    NJ Doc Hits Robert Wood Johnson With Disability Bias Suit

    A former professor of surgery at Rutgers University’s Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey has filed suit against the school, its university hospital and several staff members, claiming that he was wrongfully fired for taking medical leave.

  • June 28, 2017

    Ex-Greenberg Shareholder Jumps To Hall Booth In Atlanta

    The Southeastern firm Hall Booth Smith PC has added a former shareholder with international giant Greenberg Traurig as a partner focusing on medical malpractice and product liability in its Atlanta office.

  • June 28, 2017

    The 10 Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court Term

    Neal Katyal seemingly tried to educate Justice Samuel Alito about a well-known Latin phrase, Justice Sonia Sotomayor prayed aloud that she wouldn’t be assigned a mind-numbing opinion, and Justice Elena Kagan needled a lawyer who confused her with another justice. Here, Law360 wraps up the top moments of legal levity from the latest high court term.

  • June 28, 2017

    The Most Talkative Justice Of The High Court Term

    Since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last year, a new U.S. Supreme Court justice has emerged as the most talkative at oral arguments — and the titleholder should come as no surprise to court watchers.

  • June 28, 2017

    The Cases That Got The Justices Talking

    The justices’ level of engagement at oral argument can provide a crucial window into their thinking on an issue, but interpreting what that might mean for how they’ll rule is an elusive art. Here, Law360 looks at the sessions in which each justice engaged the most.

  • June 28, 2017

    Nurses’ Retaliation Suit Over Procedure, Not Law, Court Says

    A Georgia health provider can’t be held liable for the firings of two nurses who had earlier raised concerns about shift staffing, a state appeals court ruled on Tuesday, finding their disclosures were about internal procedures that fell outside the scope of a state whistleblower law.

  • June 27, 2017

    Ohio Plastic Surgeon Can't Delay License Suspension

    An Ohio appellate panel ruled Tuesday that a plastic surgeon can't delay suspension of his medical license due to alleged negligent patient treatment during two liposuction procedures, saying the physician didn't prove the discipline would cause "unusual hardship" pending the resolution of his appeal.

  • June 27, 2017

    Tenn. Court Says Fraud Claims Can’t Save Med Mal Suit

    A Tennessee appellate panel on Tuesday tossed a suit accusing doctors of botching a patient's medical procedures which caused a bowel obstruction and led to her death, rejecting the patient’s family's argument that the doctor fraudulently concealed facts regarding the patient’s injury.

  • June 27, 2017

    Gorsuch And Thomas Becoming Fast Friends At High Court

    In Neil Gorsuch, Clarence Thomas seems to have found a U.S. Supreme Court justice after his own heart. The court’s newest member and its most silent one cast identical votes in case after case this year, at times taking positions deemed more conservative than those of their fellow Republican appointees on the court.

  • June 27, 2017

    5 High Court Concurrences That Read Like Dissents

    “Concurring opinion” can feel like a misnomer when a justice departs from — or downright slams — the reasoning of the majority. Here are the opinions from the latest U.S. Supreme Court term in which the biggest divisions bore the label of agreement.

  • June 27, 2017

    The Sharpest Dissents From This Supreme Court Term

    While there were fewer dissents coming from the U.S. Supreme Court during its October 2016 term than in years past, justices still managed to come up with creative disses and blistering attacks when they were on the losing side. Here, Law360 highlights the term’s top dissents.

  • June 27, 2017

    Ohio Appeals Court Tosses Botched Surgery Suit

    An Ohio appellate panel has dismissed a suit accusing a vascular surgeon of botching a man’s angioplasty, which purportedly caused his death, saying the patient’s estate failed to properly counter the physician’s assertion that he did nothing wrong.

  • June 27, 2017

    Woman Asks 6th Circ. To Revive Suit Over Feeding Tube Injury

    A Kentucky woman told the Sixth Circuit on Monday that her lawsuit claiming a medical staffing company was responsible for injuries she suffered due to a physician’s assistant and doctor’s allegedly negligent replacement of a feeding tube was improperly dismissed, as the company didn’t prove the individuals were independent contractors.

  • June 27, 2017

    Ga. Appeals Court Says Stroke Patient's Suit Can Continue

    A stroke patient will be able to proceed with most of his medical malpractice suit against a Georgia hospital and its staff after an appellate court determined that a trial judge was largely correct to refuse to toss the suit.

  • June 26, 2017

    Bad Expert Voids Lymphoma Misdiagnosis Suit, Court Says

    A Kentucky appellate panel on Friday upheld a decision to end a medical negligence lawsuit brought by a woman who claims three medical professionals missed a diagnosis of her Hodgkin’s lymphoma, ruling her expert witness lacked the requisite knowledge to provide a proper critique.

  • June 26, 2017

    The Supreme Court Term By The Numbers

    Despite a contentious confirmation hearing for Justice Neil Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court term itself was mellow this year, with more unanimous cases and fewer controversial decisions. Still, there were a handful of business rulings that packed a punch.

  • June 26, 2017

    The Firms That Won Big At The Supreme Court

    One firm went undefeated at the U.S. Supreme Court this term. Another built on last year’s winning streak. And some high court powerhouses took their lumps. Here, Law360 breaks down how the firms most frequently seen at oral arguments performed this term.

  • June 26, 2017

    IP Cases Led The Pack In High Court Amicus Briefs

    Intellectual property cases took four of the top 10 spots on Law360's ranking of the U.S. Supreme Court cases that attracted the most amicus briefs this term, as disputes involving issues like patent exhaustion and offensive trademarks each generated dozens of amicus filings.

  • June 26, 2017

    Texas High Court To Hear UT Health Science Defamation Row

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear a dispute between the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and a doctor who alleges his appointment to a residency program was rescinded after four other doctors made defamatory statements about him.