Public Policy

  • December 11, 2017

    BREAKING: High Court Won't Decide If Anti-Gay Bias Is Prohibited Under Title VII

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review an Eleventh Circuit ruling affirming dismissal of a lesbian security guard’s allegations that a Georgia hospital violated Title VII by effectively firing her over her sexuality, leaving in place a circuit split over whether federal law bars discrimination against gay workers.

  • December 8, 2017

    The Law Firms Of The 2017 MVPs

    Law360's MVP award goes to attorneys who have distinguished themselves from their peers in litigation, deals and other complex matters. Find the MVPs at your firm here.

  • December 8, 2017

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To Top Attorneys From 78 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360’s 2017 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • December 8, 2017

    Former Mass. State Lawmaker Indicted On Corruption Charges

    A former leader of the Massachusetts Senate denied any wrongdoing on Friday after prosecutors unsealed a 113-count federal indictment charging him with peddling public policy and using his private firm and a shell company to take in about $1 million in bribes, kickbacks and free coffee.

  • December 8, 2017

    FTC Wants In On Oral Args Over Seattle's Uber Union Law

    The Federal Trade Commission asked the Ninth Circuit on Thursday to allow the agency to participate in oral arguments in a challenge to Seattle's ordinance allowing Uber and Lyft drivers to unionize, saying the law runs afoul of the so-called state action doctrine and could lead to too many antitrust exemptions.

  • December 8, 2017

    Trump's Tweets Crop Up At 4th Circ. Travel Ban Arguments

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday heard oral arguments in an appeal over President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban, with some of the judges highlighting the president's recent tweets, capping off a week of appellate developments over the entry restrictions.

  • December 8, 2017

    Manafort’s Extensive Edits To Ukrainian Op-Ed Revealed

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Friday revealed the extensive changes that Paul Manafort made to an op-ed published in a Ukrainian newspaper in an effort to show that the indicted former Trump campaign manager flouted a media gag order and should be left on house arrest.

  • December 8, 2017

    Ex-Fla. Legislator Gets Prison For Stealing Campaign Funds

    A former Florida state representative was sentenced Friday in federal court in Orlando to 13 months in prison and ordered to pay back more than $60,000 in campaign funds he misappropriated from two recent re-election campaigns.

  • December 8, 2017

    FERC Member's Online Comments Unethical, Landowner Says

    A landowner affected by the proposed PennEast Pipeline Project said Thursday that a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission member and former chairman has been violating ethics rules by posting biased comments on Facebook and should be removed from his position.

  • December 8, 2017

    Pharma Group Sues Calif. Over Drug Pricing Law

    Trade group Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America on Friday sued California to block a newly approved drug pricing law, calling it a vast overreach that amounts to a “nationwide ban” on price increases.

  • December 8, 2017

    Report Details Crucial Senate, House Tax Bill Differences

    The Joint Committee on Taxation released a report Thursday comparing the House and Senate versions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, highlighting differences that include where tax brackets begin, the standard deduction, maximum rate on business income of individuals and the child tax credit.

  • December 8, 2017

    DC Circ. Doesn't Think Treasury Must Provide Privileged Docs

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday remanded back to district court an order that the U.S. Department of the Treasury must turn over evidence related to decisions it made in General Motors’ 2009 bankruptcy for a related pension plan dispute, saying the lower court had not explained why a privilege claim by the White House should be disregarded. 

  • December 8, 2017

    FCC Says It Won't Release Net Neutrality Comment Logs

    The Federal Communications Commission's general counsel said Thursday the FCC must "respectfully decline" New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's request for information related to comments posted online in the net neutrality rollback proceeding, emphasizing that the commission doesn't solely rely on the comments to make its decisions.

  • December 8, 2017

    How House-Senate Negotiators Could Change Final Tax Bill

    With House and Senate leaders having appointed members to a conference committee to hash out the differences in the respective tax bills passed by the two chambers, lawmakers are rolling up their sleeves to get the bill over the finish line by the end of the year. Here, Law360 previews the role the House-Senate conferees will play in drafting the final bill.

  • December 8, 2017

    MGM Touts $675M Casino Proposal To Conn. Lawmakers

    MGM Resorts International wrote to Connecticut’s governor and legislators on Thursday to champion its proposal for a new $675 million resort casino in Bridgeport, saying it welcomes two tribes’ desire to be involved in discussions about bringing a casino to the city because a competitive process would maximize the state’s economic benefits.

  • December 8, 2017

    DC Metro's $6.5M Discrimination Deal Scores Early OK

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday gave preliminary approval to a $6.5 million settlement in a certified class action alleging Metrorail’s criminal background check policy disproportionately discriminated against African-Americans.

  • December 8, 2017

    House OKs Bill Loosening Small Firm M&A Disclosure Rules

    The House of Representatives approved a bill increasing the threshold at which small brokers must register with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday, a move that backers said would reduce overly burdensome regulations.

  • December 8, 2017

    What Is 'Informational Injury'? The FTC Wants To Find Out

    The Federal Trade Commission will consider on Monday when a breach of consumers’ data becomes an “injury,” at a workshop companies and privacy hawks are watching for clues on what kinds of data breach lawsuits the agency will bring going forward.

  • December 8, 2017

    EU, Japan Finalize Sweeping New Trade Deal

    European Union and Japanese officials announced Friday that they have finalized the details of a sweeping new trade deal that will forge two of the globe’s largest economies under a united set of trading rules.

  • December 8, 2017

    Judge Who Accepted Flynn’s Guilty Plea Recuses Himself

    The judge who accepted former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s guilty plea to a count of lying to the FBI about contacts with Russia’s ambassador before the inauguration of President Donald Trump recused himself from the case.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look Back At 2017's Enviro And Energy Law Developments

    Stacey Mitchell

    2017 has been a year of dramatic shift in United States energy and environmental policy. As the year draws to a close, it’s an apt time to review the key steps taken to achieve President Donald Trump’s campaign goals, assess the impacts of the administration’s actions, and postulate on what may be coming next, say Stacey Mitchell and Kenneth Markowitz of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • The Trump Administration’s Move Against SEC Judges

    Daniel Walfish

    The government’s new position on the constitutionality of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s administrative law judges is more far-reaching and potentially consequential than is generally understood, says Daniel Walfish, a former SEC senior counsel now with Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy LLP.

  • Series

    40 Years Of FCPA: The Untold Story Of The Resource Guide

    Charles Duross

    Much has been written about the 2012 "Resource Guide to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act," but no one has talked about the behind-the-scenes work that produced the guide — until now, say Charles Duross, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Department of Justice, and Kara Novaco Brockmeyer, former chief of the FCPA Unit at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • The Most Noteworthy Class Action Developments Of 2017

    Neal Marder

    This year has seen significant developments in the field of class action litigation. The impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Spokeo decision continued to work its way through the courts, the appeals courts have made strides on issues like ascertainability and standing to pursue injunctive relief, and Congress is considering legislation that would alter the class action landscape, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • A Quick Look At California's New Housing Bills: Part 2

    Andrew Faber

    California's new housing bills are a step toward addressing the state's affordable housing crisis, but they are not without several deficiencies. There is a distinct lack of state funding for housing, and the bills do not provide for additional California Environmental Quality Act categorical exemptions for housing projects, say Andrew Faber and Michael Branson of Berliner Cohen LLP in the final part of this article.

  • EPA Maintains Renewable Fuel Standard Status Quo, For Now

    Joel Beauvais

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Renewable Fuel Standard program has been the subject of considerable controversy this year, with important developments across all three branches of government. Joel Beauvais and Steven Croley of Latham & Watkins LLP analyze key elements of two recent EPA actions in this area, and highlight one of the looming questions for the program.

  • Proposed Calif. Anti-Discrimination Regs Cast A Wide Net

    Brian Inamine

    Companies based in California as well as those that do business there should be aware of proposed national origin discrimination regulations, which give teeth to an existing state statute that identifies national origin as a prohibited basis for discrimination, says Brian Inamine of LeClairRyan.

  • Considerations Before Self-Reporting Under New FCPA Policy

    Olga Greenberg

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s new Foreign Corrupt Practices Act policy confirms and reiterates the standards for voluntary self-disclosure, full cooperation, and timely and appropriate remediation. However, firms have to carefully assess the potential benefits along with the costs and risks, say attorneys with Eversheds Sutherland.

  • IP Protection Tips For Connected And Autonomous Vehicles

    Clinton Brannon

    The best intellectual property strategy to protect connected and autonomous vehicle developments will depend on multiple factors. With appropriate planning, a company may successfully employ a strategy involving both patents and trade secrets to maximize the chances of protecting innovation, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Following The IRS Guideline On Missing Plan Participants

    Mark Bodron

    A recent Internal Revenue Service memorandum addresses when IRS examiners should pursue potential penalties for failure to begin making required minimum distributions to missing participants in qualified plans. By following this road map, plan administrators can ensure that, in the event of an IRS audit, penalties will not be imposed, say Mark Bodron and Gabriela Alvarez of Baker Botts LLP.