Real Estate

  • May 14, 2021

    7-Eleven Sparks FTC Uproar With Close Of Speedway Deal

    7-Eleven Inc.'s decision Friday to wrap its $21 billion purchase of Speedway while the FTC merger review is still underway was assailed by the Federal Trade Commission's two Democrats, but also highlighted the ideological tensions created by the panel's even split along party lines.

  • May 14, 2021

    Feds Offer Alaska Native Veterans Up To 160 Acres Of Land

    The U.S. Department of the Interior is moving ahead with its land allotment program for Alaska Native veterans from the Vietnam War era, saying it is processing individual vets' applications for up to 160 acres while simultaneously reviewing the Trump administration's public lands orders.

  • May 14, 2021

    Mover Sues NFL's Antonio Brown Over Alleged Assault

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Antonio Brown has been hit by a lawsuit in Florida state court from a mover who says the NFL star refused to pay him when he delivered Brown's furniture across country and assaulted him along with his trainer.

  • May 14, 2021

    9th Circ. Says EPA Must Revisit Lead-Related Standards

    A divided Ninth Circuit said Friday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency improperly set a lead dust hazard standard that would still harm human health and castigated the federal government for its "lengthy, not very hopeful, saga" of combating lead paint's dangers.

  • May 14, 2021

    Texas Justices Say Bank's Eagle Ford Deed Fix Trumps Suit

    A split Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday the original parties to a property transfer can correct material errors in a deed without involving third parties who now hold the interests, reversing an intermediate appellate court's decision that invalidated a trustee's correction to Eagle Ford Shale land interests.

  • May 14, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: Realterm, Dwight, Bill Seidle's Nissan

    Realterm Logistics has reportedly dropped $28.6 million on a Florida warehouse, Dwight Capital is said to have provided $30.1 million in financing for a South Carolina multifamily property and Bill Seidle's Nissan is said to have picked up a Florida automotive building for $16 million.

  • May 14, 2021

    11th Circ. Gives Property Manager's Insurance Suit New Life

    A property management company should have a second chance to press its claim that two insurance brokers misled it about the type of property insurance it bought, the Eleventh Circuit held.

  • May 14, 2021

    REIT Innovative Industrial Buys Pa. Property For $42M

    Innovative Industrial Properties has purchased an industrial property in Pittsburgh from cannabis operator Parallel for roughly $41.8 million, according to an announcement Friday from the cannabis-focused real estate investment trust.

  • May 14, 2021

    Mass. Condo Developer Cops To Hiding $1.2M From IRS

    A Boston-area real estate developer admitted in Massachusetts federal court Thursday to bilking the government out of $482,000 by failing to list more than $1.2 million in personal construction payments from condominium residents on his tax returns.

  • May 14, 2021

    Cooley-Led Biotech Prices IPO Low As More Companies Delay

    Biotechnology firm Vera Therapeutics Inc. went public Friday after completing a $48 million initial public offering that priced well below its estimated range, represented by Cooley LLP, amid a rocky market that has prompted other companies to postpone IPOs.

  • May 14, 2021

    Timberland Investment JV Pays $386M For 199K Acres In Chile

    A venture of Timberland Investment Group, British Columbia Investment Management and APG has purchased 80,500 hectares (198,920 acres) of timberland forests in Chile for $385.5 million, the companies announced on Friday.

  • May 14, 2021

    Film Investors Can't Trace Fraud Funds To Developer's Wife

    An appeals court ruled on Friday that dozens of film investors defrauded out of £18.4 million ($25.9 million) cannot automatically trace their money to a luxury London home, saying they must prove that a fraudster's wife bought the property with tainted funds.

  • May 13, 2021

    House Clears Package To Expand Debt Collection Protections

    House Democrats approved a significant package of debt collection legislation Thursday that would put expanded protections in place for borrowers and override a U.S. Supreme Court decision limiting liability for law firms handling nonjudicial foreclosures.

  • May 13, 2021

    Boy Scouts Insurer Says Sexual Abuse Ch. 11 Claims Tainted

    A Boy Scouts of America liability insurer has accused sexual abuse claimants' attorneys of herding unverified abuse claims into the organization's Chapter 11 by offering bonuses to workers who enroll claimants and pushing for payments to those who vote in favor of the Scouts' reorganization plan.

  • May 13, 2021

    Shareholder Brings Lending Experience To Stearns Weaver

    Miami-based Stearns Weaver Miller has bolstered its real estate group with a new shareholder who brings significant experience working on commercial transactions for two banks.

  • May 13, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: Katz, Nimbus, Shoma

    An entity led by Miami Heat part owner Raanan Katz has reportedly paid $12.05 million for a Florida retail building, Nimbus is said to be leasing 9,512 square feet in downtown Brooklyn and Shoma Group has reportedly landed $16.5 million for a South Florida acquisition and mixed-use project.

  • May 13, 2021

    Life Sciences Real Estate Boom May Outlast Logistics Rush

    While the rapid growth of e-commerce has generated much buzz around a robust logistics property market as retailers gobble up distribution space, life sciences real estate is also booming, and experts say the sector has the potential to outlast logistics and remain attractive for some time. Here are three things to watch amid the life sciences boom.

  • May 13, 2021

    11th Circ. Suggests Sexual Harassment Actionable Under FHA

    Eleventh Circuit judges suggested Thursday that a Florida trial court judge went too far in ruling that sexual harassment does not constitute sex discrimination under the Fair Housing Act, indicating they might revive a woman's suit against her former landlords.

  • May 13, 2021

    Mortgage Insurer Pauses $496M IPO, Citing 'Trading Volatility'

    Citing "significant trading volatility" in its sector, the parent company of mortgage insurance business Enact Holdings said Thursday it was postponing the unit's $496 million initial public offering.

  • May 13, 2021

    Howard Hughes Corp. Lands $83M Loan For Maryland Project

    Texas-based real estate firm Howard Hughes Corp. has landed $82.57 million in financing for a Columbia, Maryland, mixed-use project, according to an announcement on Thursday from borrower-side broker Jones Lang LaSalle.

  • May 13, 2021

    Workers For Lender Want $3.9M Deal To End OT Wages Suit

    A Kansas federal judge should approve a $3.9 million settlement between Mortgage Lenders of America LLC and a collective of loan officers and team leads to resolve claims that the company failed to properly pay overtime, the workers urged in a filing.

  • May 12, 2021

    SC Justices: Insurers Can Factor Labor Costs In Loss Values

    The South Carolina Supreme Court said Wednesday a Travelers unit correctly depreciated labor costs for property repair when calculating the cash payment amounts for its policyholders' home damages, answering a certified question from a South Carolina federal court.

  • May 12, 2021

    Investors Seek $6M Win In Suit Over Failed Hotel Project

    A group of investors has asked a New York federal court for a judgment of more than $6 million in its suit accusing hotel developers of stealing funds for a project in Colombia that never happened, saying the developers breached their obligation to repay the money that was loaned.

  • May 12, 2021

    Antitrust Violation Not Enough To Revoke Realtor's License

    A Florida appeals court on Wednesday reversed the revocation of a realtor's real estate license, finding that the Department of Business and Professional Regulation did not have the authority to discipline him based solely on his conviction for antitrust violations.

  • May 12, 2021

    NJ Judge Shoots Down FCA Suit Over Lobbyist Payments

    A New Jersey federal judge dismissed a False Claims Act lawsuit against Bayada Home Health Care Inc. on Wednesday, saying it failed to make the case that the company's decision not to disclose how it paid a lobbyist when buying an Ocean City home health care agency impacted the federal government through its Medicaid and Medicare programs.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Steps For Law Firms Rethinking Flexible Work Post-COVID

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    A flexible work environment will be key to recruiting and retention efforts post-pandemic, so law firms must develop comprehensive policies that solidify expectations and boundaries on accommodations such as flextime, remote work and reduced hours, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • Indoor Air Pollution Fix Will Require New Laws, New Tech

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    The COVID-19 pandemic, an aging population and changing workplace dynamics all foretell more exposure to indoor air pollutants, so a multidisciplinary policy approach combining technology, insurance, funding and regulation will be needed to improve indoor air quality and health, says Ann Al-Bahish at Haynes and Boone.

  • CFPB's First 100 Days Lay Foundation To Maximize Authority

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    Former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau general counsel Quyen Truong, now at Stroock, analyzes how developments in the first 100 days under new CFPB leadership reclaim the agency's activist mission and authority, redirect resources toward forceful action, and open the door to change the regulatory framework.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin.'s Climate Strategy Should Include Insurance Innovations

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    To successfully meet the Biden administration's climate-related goals, the federal government must fill gaps in state regulation of environmental insurance, and help create an insurance framework that incentivizes and facilitates carbon impact reduction in four key areas, say Michael Hill and Paul Tetenbaum at Blue Dot Climate Insurance.

  • COVID Eviction Bans May Not Continue To Survive In Court

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    State and local moratoriums against evictions during the pandemic are likely to withstand plaintiffs' constitutional challenges in the short term, but plaintiffs may start to see more success as time goes on, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • Water Rule Reinstatement Shows Specific Objections Are Key

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    The Tenth Circuit's recent lifting of an injunction against the federal Navigable Waters Protection Rule in Colorado offers lessons for litigants seeking relief against an agency rule — including the importance of avoiding general allusions of harm that lack specificity or imminence, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • New Markets Credit Will Aid Recovery In Low-Income Areas

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    The recently extended New Markets Tax Credit is a critical tool for economic development in low-income communities, which have been hit especially hard by the pandemic, so public finance attorneys should consider its benefits when advising clients on projects, says Julia Fendler at Butler Snow.

  • FDCPA Ruling Has Privacy Implications For Financial Services

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    In Hunstein v. Preferred Collection, the Eleventh Circuit’s recent decision to allow claims against a debt collector who shared customer information with a vendor is concerning for financial services companies in its potential to broaden the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and other consumer protection laws to include privacy rights, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Laws Favor NYC Tenants' Discovery In Rent Overcharge Suits

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Although a New York state court's decision in Regina Metro v. New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal last year curtails certain tenant rights under the Housing Stability and Tenant Protection Act, subsequent cases have shown the law still favors broad discovery for tenants in rent overcharge cases, say Andrew Darcy and Brian Sullivan at Mobilization For Justice.

  • Kentucky Tax Talk: Biz Expansion, COVID Relief Take Spotlight

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    In a rare off-year legislative session, the Kentucky General Assembly prioritized several tax initiatives to provide immediate assistance to struggling businesses and expand new industries, such as cryptocurrency mining, in a post-pandemic world, say attorneys at Frost Brown.

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