Real Estate

  • June 05, 2023

    Judge Nixes Douglas Elliman's Fees Bid In Compass Suit

    A New York federal judge denied real estate brokerage Douglas Elliman's attorney fees motion for subpoena requests related to Compass Inc.'s antitrust suit against a New York real estate trade group, ruling that Douglas Elliman failed to show that it was unfairly burdened by Compass' subpoena requests.

  • June 05, 2023

    Excess Insurer Must Face $3M Spat With Philly Condo Assoc.

    Certain underwriters at Lloyd's of London must face a condominium association's $2.8 million flood coverage suit, a Pennsylvania federal court ruled Friday, rejecting the insurer's argument that excess coverage isn't owed yet because the underlying policy hasn't been exhausted.

  • June 05, 2023

    NJ Justices To Tackle Classification In Real Estate Wage Suit

    The New Jersey Supreme Court will mull whether a state test determining workers' employment status applies to real estate agents, about four months after an appellate panel ruled the benchmark didn't apply to an agent's suit claiming improper wage deductions.

  • June 02, 2023

    Conn. Court Finds Tenant Stiffed Landlord $360K In Rent

    A Connecticut appeals court has found a lower court was right in deciding that a series of lease modifications weren't enough to let a food service and catering business off the hook for $360,000 in back rent it tried to avoid paying as it sought to move its operations elsewhere.

  • June 02, 2023

    Fannie Investors Scolded For Bid To Reopen Expert Discovery

    A D.C. federal judge Friday denied renewed requests from Fannie Mae shareholders to reopen expert discovery and pursue reliance damages in their retrial accusing the Federal Housing Finance Agency of improperly amending stock purchase agreements after the 2008 financial crisis, lamenting, "Some parties just won't take no for an answer."

  • June 02, 2023

    AIG Unit, Miami Condominium Settle $2M Irma Damage Row

    An AIG unit and a Miami condominium association announced Friday they have reached a settlement resolving the condo's more than $2 million suit seeking excess coverage for Hurricane Irma damage.

  • June 02, 2023

    Housing Groups Sue Over Chicago Fire's $23M Land Lease

    Several advocacy groups have sued the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Chicago Housing Authority in federal court over a $23 million deal to lease 23 acres of public land to the Chicago Fire Football Club for the construction of a training facility.

  • June 02, 2023

    Real Estate Co. Must Face CoStar's Revived Copyright Claims

    A California federal judge on Friday resuscitated two of CoStar's copyright allegations against a rival real estate company that the court previously axed with prejudice and allowed back in an amended suit, ruling that the new pleadings are enough to state a claim.

  • June 02, 2023

    Texas High Court Won't Hear $10M Marina Development Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court rejected a plea from a property owner partnership to review a lower court ruling that a developer they partnered with did not breach his fiduciary duties when he used the partnership to acquire other private waterfront land for himself as part of a $10 million development deal. 

  • June 02, 2023

    US Bars Oil Leasing Near New Mexico Cultural Site

    The Biden administration on Friday issued a 20-year ban barring oil and gas leasing on federal land surrounding New Mexico's Chaco Canyon, heeding calls from Native American tribes and state lawmakers who have long sought greater protection for the area.

  • June 02, 2023

    NC City Fights $5M Judgment For Water Fees Class

    The city of Greensboro, North Carolina, told the state Court of Appeals to free it from a $5 million judgment on builders' class claims over water service fees, saying it didn't levy the fees prior to the operation of the system.

  • June 02, 2023

    Mich. Supreme Court To Hear Wind Farm Zoning Dispute

    The Michigan Supreme Court said Friday it would consider zoning officials' bid to block a NextEra Energy subsidiary from expanding a wind farm in rural Michigan, ordering oral arguments on the zoning board's petition for review.

  • June 02, 2023

    Investor Attys Nab $5.5M In SEC $170M Ponzi Suit

    A Florida federal judge has awarded $5.5 million in attorney fees to counsel representing investors in a $170 million Ponzi scheme suit lodged by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission against a Florida real estate company.

  • June 02, 2023

    Diversified And EQT Can't Escape W.Va. Unplugged Wells Suit

    Diversified Energy Co. can't evade landowners' claims alleging it and other gas companies failed to decommission thousands of West Virginia wells, after a federal judge rejected the company's contention that thousands of mineral owners could lose out on relief if not included in the proposed class.

  • June 02, 2023

    Ocwen, Wells Fargo Beat ERISA Suit Over Mortgages

    Ocwen Financial Corp. and Wells Fargo defeated a union pension fund's suit claiming the companies violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act by exploiting homeowners during the financial crisis, as a New York federal judge ruled the mortgage-backed securities at issue weren't plan assets.

  • June 02, 2023

    Feds Want Town To Stop Trespassing On Wis. Tribal Lands

    The federal government says the town of Lac Du Flambeau, Wisconsin, which has been embroiled in an ongoing dispute with a local Native American tribe over road access into its reservation, must renew right-of-way easements or face a permanent ban from the properties.

  • June 02, 2023

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen law firm Jones Day hit the crude oil trading companies it represented in a fraud trial with a breach of contract claim, offshore company Global Fixed Income Fund sue accountants Grant Thornton, and broadcasting giant Sky sue rival broadband providers BT, EE, Plusnet, Virgin Media and TalkTalk. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 01, 2023

    Trump Criminal Case Fed. Judge Won't Recuse Over Firm Ties

    The New York federal judge who will decide whether Donald Trump can move the Manhattan district attorney's hush-money prosecution from state to federal court told the parties Thursday that he won't recuse himself after reporting he once provided legal services to a company affiliated with the former president.

  • June 01, 2023

    California Co. Says Feds Axed H-1B Visa Over Job Mix-Up

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services was sued Thursday by a California startup that builds co-living communities, which claimed the agency mixed up a Chinese employee's job title and wrongly denied him an H-1B visa.

  • June 01, 2023

    Solar Farm Owner, Developers Call $135M Verdict 'Excessive'

    The owner and developers of a solar farm in Georgia have asked a federal court to shrink the $135.5 million verdict against them for damage done to a neighboring couple's property, arguing the judgment should be significantly less based on the evidence.

  • June 01, 2023

    Attys Seek $13.4M Fee Award In Academy Mortgage FCA Suit

    Attorneys representing a whistleblower have asked a California judge to award $13.4 million in fees after reaching a $38.5 million deal with Academy Mortgage to resolve a False Claims Act case.

  • June 01, 2023

    Airbnb, Hosts Say NY Law Bans Short-Term Rentals

    Airbnb and its hosts say a recent New York City law is a "de facto ban" on short-term rentals, arguing in New York state court Thursday the law wrongfully requires property owners to provide the city with private information, such as how many residents in a unit aren't related to the host.

  • June 01, 2023

    Plaintiffs' Counsel To Pitch Roles Leading RealPage Litigation

    A Tennessee federal judge has told counsel to submit applications next week to lead class action litigation accusing landlords of using RealPage Inc. software to systematically raise rental costs in the U.S.

  • June 01, 2023

    Real Estate Rumors: BofA, Sotheby's, Angelo Gordon

    Bank of America has reportedly paid $55.5 million for an Illinois industrial property, Sotheby's is said to be moving its headquarters to Madison Avenue in New York, and Angelo Gordon has reportedly paid $72.1 million for a Twin Cities-area printing facility.

  • June 01, 2023

    No Loss Shown In Mich. Preschool Zoning Spat, Judge Says

    A federal judge has sided with a Michigan township in a lawsuit over a denied permit application for a new preschool, ruling the school site's owner failed to show there was a "constitutionally protected interest" for the special use of its property and that the permit denial counted as a taking.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    How Attorneys Can Help Combat Anti-Asian Hate

    Author Photo

    Amid an exponential increase in violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, unique obstacles stand in the way of accountability and justice — but lawyers can effect powerful change by raising awareness, offering legal representation, advocating for victims’ rights and more, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Opinion

    Congress Needs To Enact A Federal Anti-SLAPP Statute

    Author Photo

    Although many states have passed statutes meant to prevent individuals or entities from filing strategic lawsuits against public participation, other states have not, so it's time for Congress to enact a federal statute to ensure that free speech and petitioning rights are uniformly protected nationwide in federal court, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Banking Tips For Lending To Calif. Homeowners Associations

    Author Photo

    With current financial markets and recent changes to California law putting a brighter spotlight on lending, banks should understand the special considerations involved in lending to homeowners associations and the various possible remedies in the event of a default, says Alex Grigorians at Hanson Bridgett.

  • As Sackett Trims Feds' Wetlands Role, States May Step Up

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Sackett v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency extinguishes federal authority over many currently regulated wetlands — meaning that federal permits will no longer be required to discharge pollutants in affected areas, but also that state regulators may take a more active role, say attorneys at Kelley Drye.

  • Some Client Speculations On AI And The Law Firm Biz Model

    Author Photo

    Generative artificial intelligence technologies will put pressure on the business of law as it is structured currently, but clients may end up with more price certainty for legal services, and lawyers may spend more time being lawyers, says Jonathan Cole at Melody Capital.

  • Trafficking Ruling Offers Liability Lessons For Hospitality Cos.

    Author Photo

    A California federal court recently dismissed a lawsuit accusing several national hotel chains of knowingly benefiting from sex trafficking at their premises, highlighting how hospitality leaders can protect their guests and staff, and shield their companies from liability and reputational damage, says Danielle Dudai at Hall Booth.

  • How Fla. Tort Reform Will Shift Construction Defect Suits

    Author Photo

    Recent modifications to Florida's private statutory action rules for building code violations and to the statute of limitations and repose for defect claims significantly clarify ambiguity that had existed under previous rules, and both claimants and defendants should consider new legal arguments that may become possible, say Ryan Soohoo and George Truitt at Cole Scott.

  • How Rent Proposals May Affect Most Populous Md. County

    Author Photo

    Of the various legislative changes concerning rent controls and property taxes that are being considered in Montgomery County, Maryland, comparatively milder controls are likely to prevail, but even these lenient measures may make it more difficult for the county to fulfill its needs for new housing, says Michael Murray at Greysteel.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Approaching Digital Assets In Discovery

    Author Photo

    The booming growth of cryptocurrency and non-fungible tokens has made digital assets relevant in many legal disputes but also poses several challenges for discovery, so lawyers must garner an understanding of the technology behind these assets, the way they function, and how they're held, says Brett Sager at Ehrenstein Sager.

  • Opinion

    High Court's Ethics Statement Places Justices Above The Law

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court justices' disappointing statement on the court's ethics principles and practices reveals that not only are they satisfied with a status quo in which they are bound by fewer ethics rules than other federal judges, but also that they've twisted the few rules that do apply to them, says David Janovsky at the Project on Government Oversight.

  • Texas Justices' PNC Opinion Clarifies Subrogation Questions

    Author Photo

    Thanks to the sorely needed clarification provided by the Texas Supreme Court in PNC Mortgage v. Howard, a home equity lender now has a better understanding of what it can do when its own lien is constitutionally invalid but is either equitably or contractually subrogated to a prior lien, say Daron Janis and Dave Foster at Locke Lord.

  • Assessing The Reach Of 9th Circuit's Natural Gas Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in California Restaurant Association v. Berkeley, affirming that the Energy Policy and Conservation Act preempts certain state and local natural gas bans, may chill other efforts to limit usage of natural gas and raises important questions for utility companies, natural gas consumers and policymakers to consider, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • What's Unique — And What's Not — In Trump Protective Order

    Author Photo

    A Manhattan judge's recent protective order limiting former President Donald Trump's access to evidence included restrictions uniquely tailored to the defendant, which should remind defense attorneys that it's always a good idea to fight these seemingly standard orders, says Julia Jayne at Jayne Law.

  • Opinion

    Time For Law Schools To Rethink Unsung Role Of Adjuncts

    Author Photo

    As law schools prepare for the fall 2023 semester, administrators should reevaluate the role of the underappreciated, indispensable adjunct, and consider 16 concrete actions to improve the adjuncts' teaching experience, overall happiness and feeling of belonging, say T. Markus Funk at Perkins Coie, Andrew Boutros at Dechert and Eugene Volokh at UCLA.

  • Ch. 13 Ruling Issues Warning To Mortgage Servicers

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel’s recent ruling in Orlansky, which held that the mortgage servicer violated the automatic stay in its post-petition communication to debtors, suggests that circuit bankruptcy courts may more closely scrutinize how certain fees are presented in monthly statements, say Justin Paget and Jennifer Wuebker at Hunton.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!