Sports & Betting

  • December 23, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Mom Says Her Prison Is 'COVID-19 Tinderbox'

    A federal judge issued a swift denial of a motion by a California mother who pled guilty in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case and asked Wednesday for an emergency release just weeks before she is scheduled to get out of prison, saying a virus outbreak has turned the facility into a "COVID-19 tinderbox."

  • December 22, 2020

    Judge Skeptical Ex-Knicks Player Was Assaulted In Ejection

    A New York federal judge appears poised to again toss a lawsuit from former New York Knicks forward Charles Oakley alleging security guards used excessive force during his controversial ejection from Madison Square Garden during a 2017 Knicks game, questioning whether video evidence backs Oakley's version of the events.

  • December 22, 2020

    Australia Rejects Google's Fitbit Fix, Continuing Probe

    Australia's antitrust watchdog said Tuesday that Google's proposed fixes aren't sufficient to ensure it won't muscle out rivals through its planned deal to buy Fitbit.

  • December 22, 2020

    Ebony Gets OK For $14M Ch. 11 Sale To Ex-NBA Player

    A Texas bankruptcy judge Tuesday approved the sale of the bankrupt owner of long-running Black cultural magazines Ebony and Jet to a company owned by a former NBA player for $14 million.

  • December 22, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine on Friday became the second to receive emergency use authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a development that came as state governments issued progress updates on the distribution of the Pfizer vaccine and unveiled plans to deliver the new one, with front-line health care workers prioritized.

  • December 21, 2020

    24 Hour Fitness Wins Approval For $1.4B Ch. 11 Plan

    Bankrupt gym chain 24 Hour Fitness won court approval Monday for a Chapter 11 plan that will work off $1.2 billion of the company's debt while positioning the slimmed-down, pandemic-battered business to start pumping out free cash after its next fiscal year.

  • December 21, 2020

    16 New Blank-Check Co. IPO Filings Bolster 2021 Pipeline

    At least 16 blank-check companies have filed new initial public offerings exceeding $3.5 billion in expected proceeds — money that can fund acquisitions in industries spanning clean energy, entertainment, health care and technology — bolstering January's pipeline as a robust 2020 comes to a close.

  • December 21, 2020

    Pandemic Delays 'Varsity Blues' Trial Until September 2021

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Monday delayed trial for four parents charged in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme from February to September 2021 after attorneys raised concerns about health risks and logistical hurdles during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • December 21, 2020

    Under Armour Worker's Disability Battle Headed To Trial

    A former Under Armour operations director who said he was canned because of mental health struggles sparked by a bad divorce will get his day in court, a Nashville federal judge decided Monday, finding that his case poses questions a jury should tackle.

  • December 21, 2020

    Boxer's Manager Accuses Co., Law Firm VGC Of Racketeering

    The manager of a world champion boxer has sued law firm VGC LLP and a management and promotional company allegedly linked to organized crime, claiming the company was engaged in a racketeering scheme to interfere with his contract with the athlete.

  • December 21, 2020

    Trader Admits He Spread Fake Disney, ESPN Rumors To Profit

    A former trader from Georgia has pled guilty to running a yearslong scheme that circulated false rumors about publicly traded companies to drive up the price of the stock and allow the scheme coordinators to profit off its sales, according to prosecutors.

  • December 21, 2020

    Schutt Sports Affiliates File Ch. 7 In Del. With $58M Debt

    A former umbrella company to Schutt Sports, a leading producer of football helmets, faceguards and other sports safety equipment, opened a Chapter 7 liquidation case along with 10 affiliates in Delaware late Friday, listing more than $58 million in liabilities and $1.2 million in sports equipment assets.

  • December 21, 2020

    Ex-Worker Says Bike-Maker's Culture Stuck In The 1950s

    A former bike designer has hit Specialized Bicycle Components with a gender bias lawsuit in a Connecticut federal court, saying the company devalues women's contributions, sidelines their projects and generally treats female workers "as if it were the 1950s." 

  • December 18, 2020

    Minor League Teams At Bat Again With Pa. Insurance Suit

    Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Co. won't "play ball" when it comes to recouping the money minor league baseball teams lost after their season was canceled in light of the coronavirus pandemic, three teams said Thursday.

  • December 18, 2020

    Fired University Coach Wants Out Of Twitter Account Suit

    An Illinois university's former baseball coach has urged a federal judge to toss the school's trademark suit that accuses him of hijacking its Twitter account after his firing and starting a rival account to trick users, saying the school has shown no evidence he was running the infringing account.

  • December 18, 2020

    New York Sports Parent Works Out Ch. 11 Confirmation In Del.

    The parent of New York Sports Clubs and its affiliates secured confirmation of a plan to liquidate remaining assets of the enterprise on Friday without breaking a sweat, following an earlier, $80 million sale of the COVID-battered main business to a top creditor.

  • December 18, 2020

    Senate Agrees To Boost USADA Funds, Require Due Process

    The U.S. Senate on Thursday passed a bill to boost the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's funding to $175 million over the next decade and impose an explicit due process requirement on anti-doping disciplinary proceedings and investigations that could lead to a violation of federal law.

  • December 18, 2020

    Washington Post Wants A Say In Wilkinson Suit Redactions

    The Washington Post on Friday asked a court for permission to intervene in a lawsuit against litigator Beth Wilkinson related to her work investigating allegations of sexual harassment in the Washington Football Team's front office, saying "substantial public interest in the suit" necessitates greater transparency.

  • December 17, 2020

    Ky. Justices Hand State $1.3B Win Against PokerStars

    The Kentucky Supreme Court reinstated the Bluegrass State's win in its decade-old illegal gambling suit against the online gaming website PokerStars on Thursday, providing the commonwealth with an award that the governor claims is nearly $1.3 billion.

  • December 17, 2020

    Athlete-Focused Bill Calls For Fed Oversight Of NCAA Sports

    Federal lawmakers on Thursday introduced legislation to allow college athletes to share in school athletic revenues and increase government oversight of college sports as part of an overhaul that questions the NCAA's role in governing college athletics as the U.S. Supreme Court is set to consider a case on the issue.

  • December 17, 2020

    Judge Hangs Up On Atty Over NY Sports Club Ch. 11 Disputes

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge ordered a law firm partner's phone cut off midsentence Thursday during a second attempt to confirm a liquidating Chapter 11 plan for New York Sports Clubs' parent company after the judge mentioned possible "professional misconduct" by attorneys at their firm. 

  • December 17, 2020

    Players Aim To Block Dismissal Of NFL Painkiller Suit

    A group of former football players is pushing back against a bid by the National Football League to throw out a suit alleging it forced them to take painkillers to keep playing, saying their claims aren't blocked by federal labor law because they don't require interpretation of their collective bargaining agreement with the league.

  • December 17, 2020

    Sports Court Cuts Russia's Doping Ban In Half

    The Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland reduced Russia's four-year ban from international competitions to two years even as it upheld numerous penalties for the Russian Anti-Doping Agency's violation of World Anti-Doping Agency rules, CAS said Thursday.

  • December 17, 2020

    CMA Targets Scottish Soccer Club Over Replica Jersey Pricing

    Britain's antitrust watchdog is investigating the Rangers Football Club and several sports apparel companies for suspected price-fixing linked to the replica team uniforms sold in the United Kingdom.

  • December 17, 2020

    EU Clears Google's $2B Fitbit Deal, With Conditions

    European Union antitrust authorities on Thursday approved Google's planned $2.1 billion purchase of fitness tracking device maker Fitbit on the conditions that the search giant shield Fitbit's user health data from Google's ad business and guarantee competitor access to Fitbit.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

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    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

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    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

  • Clients Have The Power To Promote Wellness At Law Firms

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    Law firm clients can play a role in lowering mental distress in the legal profession by seeking lawyer wellness data from firms and factoring those responses into outside counsel hiring decisions, says Jonathan Prokup at Cigna.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Courts Should Welcome Well-Crafted Amicus Briefs

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    A Seventh Circuit judge's recent order granting leave for three organizations to file amicus curiae briefs in Prairie Rivers Network v. Dynegy Midwest Generation is a reminder that relevant, nonduplicative amicus briefs can provide courts with helpful perspective, important facts and legal arguments, says Lawrence Ebner at Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • University Sportsbook Deal Raises Compliance Concerns

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    Because state and gaming industry regulations and possible NCAA guidance could limit the viability of novel partnerships like the University of Colorado's corporate sponsorship agreement with PointsBet, athletic departments need to establish clear protocols to ensure integrity and adherence to sports-betting rules, say Christopher Conniff and Nicholas Macri at Ropes & Gray.

  • What Hiring Law Firms Should Consider Instead Of Grades

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    With law schools forgoing traditional grading due to the pandemic, hiring firms that have heavily weighted first-year grades during the on-campus interview process should turn to metrics that allow a more holistic view of a candidate, says Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Schroeder Reviews 'Collegiality'

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    Mark Barringer's new book, "Collegiality and the Constitution," is an engaging, vibrant work of judicial history in Texas' Eastern District, and reveals an atmosphere of civility and respect among all those involved in the business of the court, says U.S. District Judge Robert W. Schroeder III.

  • Now Is The Time To Go Digital With Compliance Training

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    To properly meet the U.S. Department of Justice's latest corporate compliance expectations and adapt to the current remote working environment, consider collaborating with a client on an e-learning solution tailored to its employees, says Alexander Holtan at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Overcoming The Pandemic's Hurdles To Pro Bono Work

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    Sarah McLean at Shearman & Sterling looks at how attorneys and law firms can partner with nonprofits to leverage their collective resources, sharpen their legal skills and beat the unique pandemic-induced challenges to providing free legal services to low-income individuals.

  • Best Practices For Presenting Exhibits In A Remote Deposition

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    In this era of fully remote depositions, attorneys must carefully consider whether they want to deliver exhibits to opposing counsel in advance or on the day of the deposition, and think creatively about the technological resources available to them, say Helene Wasserman and Nathaniel Jenkins at Littler.

  • What We Know About How Judicial Bias Can Influence Rulings

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    The struggle to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg raises the question whether U.S. Supreme Court justices and federal judges are able to separate their political beliefs and world views from their judicial opinions, with studies in political science and social psychology providing clear answers, says Drury Sherrod at Mattson and Sherrod.

  • Celebrity Disinformation Victims Have Panoply Of Remedies

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    Celebrities such as LeBron James, whose likeness was recently used without his permission as part of a voter suppression disinformation campaign, can avail themselves of several causes of action successfully used in recent cases — ranging from copyright to torts — to protect their likenesses and reputations, say Matthew Ferraro and Louis Tompros at WilmerHale.

  • Law Firm Social Responsibility Strategies In The New Normal

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    Law firm leaders and marketers should consider several fundamental questions as they develop their corporate social responsibility programs amid the pandemic with reduced available time, money and personnel, including identifying a realistic charitable spending budget and seeking input from firm lawyers, clients and nonprofit partners, says Tina van der Ven at NewStar Media.

  • What To Expect On Key Civil Procedure Issues From Barrett

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    Judge Amy Coney Barrett's prolific opinion writing on the Seventh Circuit reveals a clear picture of what we can expect from this jurist on issues such as state court personal jurisdiction over out-of-state defendants, Article III standing and the application of federal law in diversity actions, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • A Likely Tipping Point For Nonlawyer Ownership Of Law Firms

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    The Arizona Supreme Court's recent decision to eliminate prohibitions on nonlawyer ownership of law firms may show that the organized bar's long-standing rhetoric that such rules are essential to protecting the legal profession's core values is overblown, say Anthony Sebok at Cardozo School of Law and Bradley Wendel at Cornell Law School.

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