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Sports & Betting

  • May 24, 2019

    NCAA Rips $45M Atty Fee Bid In Student Athlete Pay Suit

    The $45 million attorney fee bid from the legal team whose March victory barred the NCAA from restricting student athletes' education-related compensation is unreasonable because it seeks pay for "excessive, redundant, and unnecessary" hours worked, the NCAA said in California federal court Friday.

  • May 24, 2019

    Seeger Stands Alone: 5 Firms Tossed From NFL Settlement

    In a move that came as a surprise and left many attorneys furious, the federal judge overseeing the NFL’s landmark concussion settlement terminated all of the deal’s leading lawyers except Chris Seeger on Friday, heightening long-simmering tensions between Seeger and his fellow attorneys and plunging the contentious case into uncharted waters.

  • May 24, 2019

    NCAA Compliance A Duty Of Coaches, Post-Trial Ruling Says

    Even if it is not the job of college basketball coaches to recommend financial advisers to players, they can still be criminally liable if they do so in exchange for bribes, a New York federal judge has said in an opinion fleshing out an earlier ruling that forced two men to face trial on bribery charges.

  • May 24, 2019

    UK Sports Agent Group Wants Out Of Calif. Employment Suit

    London-based sports agency group TLA Worldwide PLC on Friday urged a California federal court to dismiss it from a suit by a Major League Baseball agent alleging it violated their employment agreement when he was fired, arguing that it is no longer affiliated with the subsidiary that had employed the agent.

  • May 24, 2019

    Greece To Challenge Ruling On Enforcement Of $54M Award

    Greece has said it will appeal a ruling that paves the way for Leidos Inc. to begin collecting a confirmed €47.9 million ($53.7 million) arbitral award against the country, which it had disputed because of a pending challenge in its home courts.

  • May 24, 2019

    Jeweler, Developer, Marketer Cop To 'Varsity Blues' Charges

    Three California parents — a marketing executive, a resort developer and the owner of a jewelry business — pled guilty in Boston federal court Friday to bribing the mastermind of a nationwide college admissions scheme to help their children cheat on entrance exams.

  • May 24, 2019

    Lone Star Laterals: Crowe & Dunlevy, Husch Blackwell

    In our latest roundup of Texas partners on the move, Crowe & Dunlevy PC added a trio of partners in Dallas, Husch Blackwell LLP picked up an appellate partner in Houston and Barnes & Thornburg LLP added a former in-house counsel for an asset management firm to its corporate group. 

  • May 23, 2019

    Ex-NFL Player Wants Cash Advance Contract Tossed

    Former NFL player Toby Wright asked a Pennsylvania federal judge on Thursday to toss his agreement with Thrivest Specialty Funding LLC, arguing that both the judge and the Third Circuit had said such agreements assigning part of NFL players' concussion-related settlements to third-party funders were void.

  • May 23, 2019

    PE-Backed Endeavor Group Files $100M IPO Led By 2 Firms

    Private equity-backed entertainment giant Endeavor Group Holdings Inc. filed an initial public offering on Thursday, listing a preliminary funding target of $100 million, under guidance from Latham & Watkins LLP, with Ropes & Gray LLP counseling the underwriters.

  • May 23, 2019

    Horse Racing Co. Must Pay $1.6M For Labor, H-2B Violations

    A New York thoroughbred horse racing trainer must part with over $1.6 million after the U.S. Department of Labor discovered that his company had underpaid 150 of its employees, including its migrant workers, in violation of federal labor laws and the H-2B visa program regulations, the DOL said Wednesday.

  • May 23, 2019

    Calif. Closer To Allowing NCAA Athlete Name, Image Pay

    The NCAA may be forced to deal with players earning money from their names, images and likenesses whether it wants to or not, after a California bill to allow players to sign sponsorships and endorsements cleared a key legislative hurdle this week.

  • May 23, 2019

    NFL Didn't Make Sponsor Ditch Romo Expo, Panel Says

    A fantasy football convention backed by former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo can't pursue claims that the NFL forced a sponsor to back out of its 2016 event, a Texas appeals court has ruled, saying the convention hasn't presented any evidence the NFL intended to interfere in the agreement. 

  • May 22, 2019

    US Tells Justices Immunity Case Turns On Tribal Law Change

    The solicitor general has told the U.S. Supreme Court that Alabama's top court wrongly allowed a drunken driving-related suit to proceed against a tribal casino, but said the court should wait to see if the tribe waives its sovereign immunity to tort suits before deciding whether to hear its case.

  • May 22, 2019

    Jay Peak's Ex-Developers Indicted Over Failed EB-5 Project

    Federal prosecutors in Vermont unsealed an indictment Wednesday charging the former owner of ski resort Jay Peak and three of his associates with skimming funds from immigrant investors in an alleged EB-5 visa fraud scheme.

  • May 22, 2019

    Managers Say Boxer Gennady Golovkin Owes Them $27.4M

    The former managers of middleweight boxer Gennady Golovkin fired back Wednesday in California state court against claims their management deal was invalid with a counterclaim that the boxer owes them more than $27.4 million in royalties.

  • May 22, 2019

    Burrito Magnate, 2 Others Plead Guilty In 'Varsity Blues'

    Three more parents charged in the “Varsity Blues” college admissions scheme pled guilty Wednesday in Massachusetts federal court, admitting that they paid thousands to the mastermind of the operation to have their children’s test scores altered.

  • May 22, 2019

    Ex-NBA Player Asks 2nd Circ. To Reset Clock In Pension Suit

    A former Seattle Supersonics player on Wednesday urged the Second Circuit to revive his proposed class action accusing the NBA Players' Pension Plan of stiffing him on retirement benefits stemming from cost-of-living increases, saying a district court dropped the ball when it ruled he waited too long to file the case. 

  • May 22, 2019

    Baker Botts, Saul Ewing Pilot $2B NASCAR-Intl Speedway Buy

    Stock car racing organization NASCAR has agreed to acquire racetrack owner International Speedway, host of the famous Daytona 500 race, in a $2 billion deal guided by attorneys from Baker Botts and Saul Ewing, the companies announced Wednesday.

  • May 21, 2019

    OSU Sex Abuse Victims Could Be In Thousands, Attys Say

    Attorneys representing men who say they were sexually abused by former Ohio State University sports doctor Richard Strauss said Tuesday that the report released by the university last week finding at least 177 victims only "scratches the surface," alleging the total number of victims could be in the thousands.

  • May 21, 2019

    Disabled Mariners Fans Say Stadium Improvements Fall Short

    Four wheelchair users told a Washington federal court Monday that despite some recent improvements at the Seattle Mariners' stadium, the Major League Baseball venue remains largely inaccessible to them.

  • May 21, 2019

    Convicted Life Time Fitness Trader Asks For Acquittal

    A California stock trader told an Illinois federal judge Tuesday that he should never have been convicted in an insider trading conspiracy case surrounding Life Time Fitness Inc., arguing he was too far removed from an information leak to be part of the criminal plot.

  • May 21, 2019

    4th Man Charged In NFL Player's Insider Trading Case

    Prosecutors and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission have filed charges against a fourth man accused of participating in the insider trading scheme that a former Goldman Sachs associate and a Seattle Seahawks linebacker pled guilty to running last year.

  • May 21, 2019

    Ex-U Of Ariz. Coach Wants No Prison In Hoops Bribery Case

    A former University of Arizona assistant basketball coach is asking a New York federal court not to sentence him to prison, saying the public humiliation and loss of his job has already severely punished him for accepting bribes to steer college recruits to a pair of financial managers.

  • May 21, 2019

    Ex-Willkie Co-Chair Pleads Guilty In 'Varsity Blues'

    Gordon Caplan, the former co-chair of Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, pled guilty Tuesday in Boston federal court to paying $75,000 to the mastermind of the "Varsity Blues" nationwide college admissions scheme to have a proctor alter his daughter’s ACT exam answers.

  • May 20, 2019

    Ballard Spahr Guides Push For Women's Hockey League

    A group of women's professional hockey players on Monday said they have formed a new trade organization to promote the development of a viable professional women's hockey league after a Canada-based league folded with little warning earlier this year.

Expert Analysis

  • Real-Life Lessons For Lawyers From 'Game Of Thrones'

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    What lessons can the various hands, maesters, council members and other advisers in "Game of Thrones" impart to real-life lawyers? Quite a few, if we assume that the Model Rules of Professional Conduct were adopted by the Seven Kingdoms, says Edward Reich of Dentons.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your Summer Associates Succeed

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    There are a number of ways that attorneys can ensure their summer associates successfully manage critical writing assignments and new types of professional interactions, says Julie Schrager of Schiff Hardin.

  • Keys To Communicating A Law Firm's Mission

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    Today’s law firm leaders are pretty good at developing a strategic vision for the enterprise, but there is often a disconnect between that road map and the marketing department’s rank and file, leading to a deliverable that does little to differentiate the firm, says José Cunningham, a legal industry consultant.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

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    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Cashless Retail Brings Benefits, Drawbacks And Backlash

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    Retailers exploring the cashless option should carefully consider the customer experience, as well as legislation being advanced by numerous state and city governments to require businesses to accept cash, say Meegan Brooks and Douglas Kantor at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • Opinion

    NY Should Think Twice Before Legalizing Sports Betting

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    Instead of rushing to compete in sports betting with other states, New York state legislators should consider problems that have occurred in states that have legalized it, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • 6 Ways To Keep Your Jury From Zoning Out

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    Science suggests that at least some jurors pay attention to less than 65% of the evidence during a trial due to "task-unrelated thoughts," but there are steps attorneys can take to present information in a more engaging, cognition-friendly fashion, say Dennis Stolle and Dennis Devine of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 5 Myths In Legal Crisis Communications

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    Having worked at a boutique law firm, a crisis communications agency and in BigLaw, I have identified a number of common misconceptions across these disparate business models when it comes to crisis and litigation communications, says Robert Gemmill of Hogan Lovells.

  • The 'Varsity Blues' Sentencing Battles To Come

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    Of the seven factors federal judges consider when sentencing defendants, three will be particularly interesting to watch in the college admissions bribery case, says Brooklyn Sawyers Belk of Weinberg Wheeler.

  • An Overview Of The Debate Over Litigation Finance Disclosure

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    In light of a New York federal court's recent decision in Benitez v. Lopez, which joins a growing body of case law denying forced disclosure of commercial litigation finance, Stephanie Spangler of Norris McLaughlin and Dai Wai Chin Feman of Parabellum Capital break down the arguments commonly raised for and against disclosure.

  • How To Identify And Deal With Narcissists In Law

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    Given that a large swath of the legal profession may display some narcissistic tendencies, it is important for lawyers to know how to address the narcissist in the room — and it may be you, says Jennifer Gibbs of Zelle.