Technology

  • October 16, 2017

    Deals Rumor Mill: Saudi Aramco, AT&T, iQiyi

    Chinese state-owned oil companies have interest in buying into Saudi Aramco ahead of its planned $100 billion IPO, Brazil’s antitrust watchdog will greenlight AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner, with conditions, and Chinese video streaming service iQiyi has picked banks to help with its IPO.

  • October 16, 2017

    Comcast, Others Infringed Home Security Patent, Suit Says

    Video surveillance technology company ComCam International hit Comcast Cable Communications, Abode Systems and SimpliSafe with suits in Delaware federal court Friday, accusing the companies of infringing its internet-based security, fire and emergency identification system patent with their home security and automation products.

  • October 16, 2017

    Former RadioShack Employees Object To Del. Ch. 11 Plan

    A group of former employees suing defunct RadioShack over botched mass layoffs urged a Delaware bankruptcy court Monday to shoot down the electronic retailer’s proposed Chapter 11 plan, saying it provides no information on how RadioShack will pay for the proposed class action if the laid-off workers prevail.

  • October 16, 2017

    High Court To Weigh Microsoft Overseas Data Warrant Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to review a Second Circuit decision that the federal government can’t use search warrants to access user data stored overseas by service providers such as Microsoft.

  • October 13, 2017

    Yahoo's Info On 2B Hacked Accounts Doesn't Satisfy Judge

    The California federal judge overseeing multidistrict litigation over Yahoo's 2013 data breach said Friday that recent revelations that 2 billion additional accounts were impacted put the case "back at square one," and expressed frustration at the amount of information Yahoo has revealed about the hack's broadened scope.

  • October 13, 2017

    Google Sharing App User Data Without Permission, Suit Says

    Google has breached its contract with Wallet users who buy apps through its Play store by sharing their email addresses, phone numbers and other personal data with third-party app developers without their permission, according to a putative class action recently removed to California federal court.

  • October 13, 2017

    Mediation, Trial Set In TracFone-Simply Wireless Dispute

    A Florida federal judge has ordered Simply Wireless and TracFone to mediate TracFone’s suit accusing Simply Wireless of taking free airtime that TracFone provided for new customers and selling that time to existing users, while also setting a trial date for next summer, according to an order issued Friday.

  • October 13, 2017

    4 Firms To Guide IPOs Surpassing $1.8B

    Four firms are set to guide five initial public offerings estimated to raise more than $1.8 billion during the week of Oct. 16 as activity accelerates in what is regarded as a sweet spot on the IPO calendar.

  • October 13, 2017

    GAO To Probe FCC 'Attack' In Net Neutrality Row

    The Government Accountability Office said Friday it will probe a reported cyberattack of the Federal Communications Commission that may have disrupted public comment over net neutrality, in an investigation a former FCC bureau chief hopes will answer lingering questions over whether the episode was, in fact, an “attack.”

  • October 13, 2017

    Patent Litigator Goes After Wearables For Seniors

    Frequent patent-litigation plaintiff SportBrain sued Reemo Health LLC in Illinois federal court on Friday over Reemo's wearable devices and smart tech for seniors, saying they infringe a SportBrain patent covering the capture of personal data in mobile devices.

  • October 13, 2017

    SunEdison Can End IP Contract With Korean Co., Judge Rules

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Friday found that a supply and license agreement between SunEdison Inc. and a Korean company it helped create to manufacture solar materials is governed by New York law and was properly terminated, allowing SunEdison to sell the patent rights to the production process.

  • October 13, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Smartphone Makers' ITC Win Under Alice

    The Federal Circuit on Friday upheld a U.S. International Trade Commission ruling that found a Creative Technology Ltd. media player patent is invalid under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Alice decision, sealing a win for various smartphone makers, including Sony Corp. and Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.

  • October 13, 2017

    Del. Court Tosses Ripple, R3 Crypto-Cash Contract Clash

    Citing lack of jurisdiction under any theory, a Delaware court on Friday dismissed a potential $1.3 billion contract breach claim filed by enterprise software firm R3 HoldCo LLC against blockchain developer Ripple Labs and its XRP cryptocurrency subsidiary.

  • October 13, 2017

    Auto Software Maker Wants Rival's Sales Halted

    An Illinois-based maker of software that lets car buffs “tune” their rides asked a Washington federal judge Thursday to stop a rival from selling competing products at an upcoming trade show it claims were made with hacked trade secrets.

  • October 13, 2017

    Media Wants Rethink Of Gag Orders On FBI Data Requests

    Media organizations including The New York Times Co. and Dow Jones & Co. Inc. asked the Ninth Circuit Thursday to rehear a decision ending a constitutional challenge to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's use of national security letters that bar service providers from telling users about government requests for their data.

  • October 13, 2017

    Uber Appeals London License Ban, Will 'Make Things Right'

    Uber Technologies Inc. on Friday appealed to a London court a decision by the city’s transportation regulator to strip the company of its license to operate, buying itself time to continue offering its ride-hailing services in the British capital while negotiating with officials to reinstate its license, saying it will "make things right."

  • October 13, 2017

    Deal Makers' Interest In Tech M&A Continues To Rise

    The market for tech mergers and acquisitions is expected to pick up as private equity and corporate acquirers alike look to stay ahead of the competition, meaning more intense bidding wars and increasingly complex due diligence processes are on the horizon for deal makers and their legal advisers.

  • October 13, 2017

    Tech Co. Wins Intelligence Agency's $1B IT Management Deal

    Science and technology company Leidos has won an almost $1 billion contract to provide information technology management services to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, according to a statement Thursday.

  • October 13, 2017

    Canon Defends $1.8M Attys’ Fees In Memory Card IP Row

    Canon Inc. on Thursday asked the Federal Circuit to uphold a ruling saying that the holders of two flash memory card reader patents owe it nearly $1.8 million in attorneys’ fees after an exceptional infringement case, reasoning that their flimsy arguments underscore that the court did not abuse its discretion.

  • October 13, 2017

    Arent Fox IP Litigation Duo Joins Crowell & Moring In SF

    Crowell & Moring LLP has hired two Arent Fox LLP intellectual property litigators for its litigation group in San Francisco, bolstering the firm’s ability to serve clients in high-stakes disputes involving technology innovation, Crowell & Moring said Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • A Big Drone Victory For FAA

    Kenneth Quinn

    A Massachusetts federal judge's recent decision in Singer v. Newton showed substantial deference to Federal Aviation Administration regulations, highlighting the tension between local, state and federal governments over drone regulation. It may impact the consideration of bills pending before Congress, say attorneys with Baker McKenzie.

  • Financial Crisis Anniversary

    New Post-Recession Metrics For BigLaw Partner Success

    Peter Zeughauser

    After nearly a decade of recession-accelerated change in the legal industry, “merit-based” compensation has largely come to mean measuring attorney success using some combination of origination and working attorney hours metrics. However, there are signs that the real impact of the recession is still around the corner, and that building a book isn’t enough, says Peter Zeughauser of Zeughauser Group.

  • Understanding FDA Guidance On Connected Medical Devices

    Erin Bosman

    Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued final guidance concerning the safety of interoperable medical devices. Complying with the guidance will help satisfy the FDA that a manufacturer has accounted for appropriate risk and safety factors, and may help defend against product liability claims, say attorneys with Morrison & Foerster LLP.

  • Opinion

    Time To Lift Student Loan Counseling Restrictions

    Christopher Chapman

    While it lends more than $100 million each year to our nation’s college students — including law students — the U.S. Department of Education surprisingly limits loan counseling to one-time entrance counseling for first-time student borrowers. Is this rational? asks Christopher Chapman, president of AccessLex Institute, a nonprofit focused on access to legal education.

  • The Future Of Standard-Essential Patents At The ITC

    Bryan J. Vogel

    For the second time in four years, the U.S. International Trade Commission has been asked to exclude products from import into the United States based on standard-essential patents. The Fujifilm case is a potential opportunity for the ITC to clarify what the proper test is for essentiality in the absence of a contractually agreed-upon definition, say Bryan Vogel and Derrick Carman ​​​of Robins Kaplan LLP.

  • SEC Stakes Claim As Digital Currency Regulator

    Robert Khuzami

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recent enforcement action against Maksim Zaslavskiy and his two companies firmly establishes the commission’s assertion of authority over digital currencies. But it is important to note that the SEC’s recent foray into digital currencies is not the first assertion of regulatory authority in this arena, say attorneys with Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • 3 Strategies I Learned From LegalZoom

    Jeff Unger

    Critics of legal tech companies will often say, “Trust a reputable attorney that understands you, your situation and the law.” As an attorney, I wholeheartedly agree. But from the consumer’s perspective, the message seems out of touch with the digital age, says Jeff Unger, founder of the law firm eMinutes.

  • Why You Should Consider Hyperlinking Your Next Brief

    Christine Falcicchio

    The shift to electronic filing has somewhat eased the task of reviewing briefs and their supporting files. An e-brief takes e-filing to the next level, says Christine Falcicchio, a principal at Strut Legal Inc.

  • How Hotel Owners Can Respond To Evolving Technology

    Samantha Ahuja

    As the role of guest-facing technology proliferates and brands update their standards, hotels and hotel managers must negotiate their management and franchise agreements in order to protect themselves, say attorneys with Morris Manning & Martin LLP.

  • Asian-Americans Facing Challenges In The Legal Industry

    Goodwin Liu

    Asian-Americans are the fastest-growing minority in the legal profession, but recent studies confirm their underrepresentation among partners, prosecutors, judges and law school administrators. We must take action, say Goodwin Liu, associate justice of the California Supreme Court, and Ajay Mehrotra of the American Bar Foundation.