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Technology

  • May 22, 2019

    Ruling In FTC's Qualcomm Case Could Upend SEP Licensing

    A California federal judge dealt Qualcomm a huge blow Tuesday by ruling that its model for licensing cellular modem chips is illegal, issuing a strongly worded opinion that dampens prospects for a likely appeal and could lead other players in the cellular industry to revisit their licensing practices.

  • May 22, 2019

    AIG Unit's Failure To Defend Yahoo Was Bad Faith, Jury Says

    A California federal jury found Wednesday that an AIG subsidiary acted in bad faith when it failed to cover Yahoo Inc.’s costs to defend a consolidated class action accusing it of unlawfully scanning customers' emails.

  • May 22, 2019

    Google Facing Inquiry Over Targeted Ads' GDPR Compliance

    Ireland's privacy regulator said Wednesday that it is investigating whether Google's online Ad Exchange violates the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, a case likely to have implications for the broader targeted advertising ecosystem.

  • May 22, 2019

    Cisco Beats Patent Suit Hinging On Omitted Inventor

    Cisco Systems Inc. escaped a lawsuit accusing the tech giant of infringing a network patent held by competing software company Egenera Inc. on Wednesday when a Massachusetts federal judge declared the patent invalid for failing to name all the inventors.

  • May 22, 2019

    7 Takeaways From Qualcomm’s Stinging Defeat

    A California federal judge has taken Qualcomm to task for what she says are the chipmaker’s anti-competitive licensing practices. Here, Law360 breaks out some of the key findings from the decision requiring the company to fundamentally alter its business model, which had required smartphone makers to license patents at “unreasonably high royalty rates.”

  • May 22, 2019

    Draft Patent Eligibility Bill Would Undo Alice, Mayo

    A group of lawmakers on Wednesday unveiled a draft bill to overhaul the law on what is eligible for a patent, which would effectively overturn U.S. Supreme Court decisions that patents are invalid for claiming only abstract ideas, laws of nature or natural phenomena.

  • May 22, 2019

    Split Fed. Circ. Faults PTAB Ax Of Sony DVD Patent

    The Federal Circuit ruled Wednesday that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board wrongly invalidated a now-expired Sony patent on DVDs that can store multiple language tracks, though one dissenting judge said the patent’s expiration should have barred Sony from appealing.

  • May 22, 2019

    Priceline Didn't Infringe IBM Patent, Split Fed. Circ. Affirms

    Priceline, Kayak and OpenTable didn’t infringe an IBM digital advertising patent, a divided Federal Circuit panel said on Wednesday, upholding a Delaware district court’s ruling.

  • May 22, 2019

    Microsoft To Harness TV 'White Space' Plan In VA Partnership

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will be teaming up with Microsoft Corp. to give more veterans living in rural areas access to the internet as part of the software giant's initiative to repurpose unused swaths of the TV-band spectrum for rural broadband.

  • May 22, 2019

    Qualcomm's Illegal Licensing Practices: How We Got Here

    A California federal judge ruled late Tuesday that Qualcomm’s patent licensing practices violate federal antitrust law, siding with the Federal Trade Commission in a decision that threatens to upend a core part of the chipmaker’s business. Here’s a step-by-step look at how we got to this point.

  • May 22, 2019

    'Smarmy' Behavior Not Exactly Fraud, Fed. Circ. Judge Says

    A Federal Circuit judge laid into attorneys Wednesday as she heard arguments in a patent fraud case, saying at one point that even though she was unsure alleged omissions in a patent application rose to the level of fraud, she had grounded her children for omitting less.

  • May 22, 2019

    New Bill Would Offer $700M For Huawei Equipment Removal

    A Senate bill floated Wednesday aims to help U.S. networks extract equipment made by Huawei, setting aside $700 million to subsidize the overhaul amid escalating fears that the Chinese telecom giant will use its technology to spy on American customers.

  • May 22, 2019

    Wireless Co. Beats Ubiquiti's Suit Over Hacking Firmware

    Ubiquiti Networks Inc. made overly broad claims that a rival wireless networking company sells hacking firmware that uses Ubiquiti's devices as a launching point for its own service, an Illinois federal judge said Wednesday as he dismissed the case.

  • May 22, 2019

    Garmin Can Get Lost With 'Lifetime' GPS Claims, Buyer Says

    A disgruntled customer hit navigation device maker Garmin with a proposed class action Wednesday, claiming the company tells customers its GPS systems come with “lifetime” support but then arbitrarily stops updating them when they run out of memory.

  • May 22, 2019

    Gov't Tells Justices Not To Hear $59M Light Sensor Fight

    The federal government on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court not to take up an appeal of a Federal Circuit ruling that could open a new avenue for patent damages on outside-the-U.S. sales, saying a light sensor patent owner cannot recover for unauthorized foreign sales even if the alleged infringer makes the offer in the U.S.

  • May 22, 2019

    Qualcomm's 'No License, No Chips' Model Illegal, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge ruled Tuesday that Qualcomm's decadeslong "no license, no chips" business practice violates federal antitrust laws, handing the Federal Trade Commission a win and upending how the chipmaker negotiates standard-essential patent licenses covering smartphone technology.

  • May 21, 2019

    Tough T-Mobile Conditions Leave Many Open Questions

    FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said he drove a hard bargain to win a package of concessions from T-Mobile as part of the company's bid to acquire Sprint, but critics of the agreement say it doesn't go far enough to ward off the merger's possible harms.

  • May 21, 2019

    Judge Cites Growing Cyberthreats In Preserving Voting Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday refused to scrap a lawsuit challenging the state's allegedly insecure electronic voting process, ruling increasingly prevalent challenges with securing the U.S. election system in "today's era of heightened cybersecurity threats" bolstered voters' constitutional claims. 

  • May 21, 2019

    Microsoft Calls For US Privacy Law Putting Onus On Firms

    Companies should be more accountable for managing data collection, according to Microsoft's top privacy lawyer, who is calling for a shift away from solely relying on consumers to opt in or out as the U.S. government considers its first-ever comprehensive privacy law. 

  • May 21, 2019

    3rd Circ. Will Hear FCC Broadcast Dereg Dispute In June

    The latest court fight over the Federal Communications Commission's effort to relax its media ownership rules will begin June 11, the Third Circuit said Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    FTC V. Qualcomm Should Be Viewed Through A Wider Lens

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    The U.S. Department of Justice recently stated that a remedy in Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm, pending in the Northern District of California, “should work as little injury as possible to other public policies.” The DOJ’s counsel gains added force from provocative evidence in the foreshortened Apple-Qualcomm licensing trial in the Southern District of California, says professor David Teece of the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

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    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Apple Credit Card's Legal And Ethical Implications For Fintech

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    Security advocates generally agree that the Apple Card — Apple's foray into the credit card industry, slated for this summer — will be safer than typical credit card transactions, but some privacy and consumer liability concerns do exist, say Aaron Swerdlow of Weinberg Gonser and Joel Sherwin of Neopay.

  • Union Of Tech, Life Sciences And Health Care Is Here To Stay

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    The growing number of high-profile convergence deals between life sciences, health care and technology companies is creating both opportunities and challenges for the business and legal professionals who implement such complex arrangements, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • Trends And Strategies In AI-Related Patent Filings

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    The rapid adoption of artificial intelligence-based tools and applications across most industries means that even patent practitioners outside of computer and electrical engineering fields may be presented with AI-related invention disclosures, says Allison Gaul of Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • 10 Ways Tech Is Disrupting Patent Procurement

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    Document automation, process automation and big data insights are changing how some patent professionals and patent practices operate, says Ian Schick of Specifio.

  • The Evolution Of Software As A Service Taxes Post-Wayfair

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    Due to the expanded nexus provisions following South Dakota v. Wayfair, software as a service providers need to be especially aware of the recent — and, at times, divergent — state law developments in SaaS taxation, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Opinion

    Calif. Fair Pay Law Is Unfair To Startup Founders

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    It's time for legislatures and courts to recognize the unfair burden the California Fair Day’s Pay Act has placed on company leaders — like founders of California startups — by holding them liable for failure to pay wages, say David Siegel and Mital Mikada of Grellas Shah.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.