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Technology

  • February 15, 2019

    The $1B Question: Can Puerto Rico Afford Its Bankruptcy Bills?

    Law firms and other professional service providers are seeking more than $300 million in bills for Puerto Rico’s unprecedented restructuring — a figure that is eventually expected to surpass $1 billion. Some local attorneys are questioning the costs. (This article is part of a series on how the island’s legal industry is rebuilding after Hurricane Maria.)

  • February 15, 2019

    Puerto Rico’s Law Firms Find Their Footing After Disaster

    Out of disaster comes opportunity. That is what the corporate legal community of Puerto Rico found after Hurricane Maria. But for many attorneys, the recovery is personal, too. (This article is part of a series on how the island’s legal industry is rebuilding after Hurricane Maria.)

  • February 15, 2019

    TracFone Sues Texas Cos. In Latest Anti-Trafficking Effort

    Wireless service provider TracFone sued three Texas-based companies Friday, accusing them of running a phone smuggling ring that cuts into its business model, marking the latest salvo in the telecom’s more than decade-long crusade to stop companies from trafficking its tech.

  • February 15, 2019

    Film Studios Say Omniverse Sold Pirated Movies, Shows

    Disney, Paramount Pictures Corp., Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. and other Hollywood heavyweights have sued Omniverse One World Television in California federal court, accusing the company of selling illegal packages of unlicensed, copyrighted movie and TV shows to streaming services.

  • February 15, 2019

    Sens. Urge FCC To Create Public Portal For Broadband Gaps

    A bipartisan group of senators has asked the Federal Communications Commission to look into creating a portal for the public to submit data detailing gaps in high-speed internet service in order to tackle concerns that national broadband maps are riddled with errors.

  • February 15, 2019

    Pokemon Co. Promises No 'Go' In Deal To End Trespass Row

    Niantic Inc., the company behind Pokemon Go, has promised to take steps aimed at dissuading players of the popular augmented reality game from trespassing on private property and causing other nuisances, as part of a proposed settlement outlined in documents filed Thursday in California federal court.

  • February 15, 2019

    Facebook Data Leak Negotiations Put FTC In Hot Seat

    As negotiations reportedly heat up, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission is facing pressure to give Facebook a historic fine for its notorious data leak or face off with the social network in a court battle that could test the teeth of its consent decrees.

  • February 15, 2019

    Oracle's Anti-Arbitration Line Is 'Man Bites Dog,' Judge Says

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Friday of Oracle Inc.'s appeal of a decision to send an ex-worker's putative class action over sales commission pay to arbitration, with one judge calling the company's anti-arbitration stance ironic and a "man bites dog" situation.

  • February 15, 2019

    O'Rielly Praises Muni Broadband Terms Of Service Revamp

    FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly praised the city of Chattanooga, Tennessee, on Friday for changing out phrases in its web terms of service that he had previously flagged as potentially limiting free speech online.

  • February 15, 2019

    FCC Urged To Tread Lightly On 6-GHz Unlicensed Use

    The Federal Communications Commission should be cautious about opening up the 6 GHz band, which is set aside for broadcast and satellite transmissions, to shared uses by unlicensed devices, the city of Austin and others told the agency in filings posted Friday.

  • February 15, 2019

    GoPro Will Pay $6.75M To End Stock Drop Suit

    A proposed class of investors suing GoPro Inc. for allegedly concealing missteps that caused its stock to drop have asked a California federal court to approve a $6.75 million settlement to put those claims to rest, calling the deal an "excellent result."

  • February 15, 2019

    Gone Phishing: How Law Firms Can Thwart Cyber Hustlers

    While cyberattacks may come via email or social media, the underlying crime is one of human deception that could have occurred in the past by phone or in person. Yet the high-tech nature of such scams may make them harder to sniff out, with a recent case of a Dentons attorney being a cautionary tale.

  • February 15, 2019

    Ballard Spahr Adds 2 'Silicon Slopes' Attys In Salt Lake City

    Two business lawyers with longtime ties to Utah’s “Silicon Slopes” network of technology startups and emerging companies have joined Ballard Spahr LLP’s business and finance practice in the law firm’s Salt Lake City office, the firm has announced.

  • February 15, 2019

    Technology Group Of The Year: Latham & Watkins

    Latham & Watkins LLP spent the past year representing top tech giants, including Facebook and Apple, in high-stakes litigation that has reached the U.S. Supreme Court, in addition to advising Spotify in the music streaming service's historic, direct listing on the New York Stock Exchange, earning the firm a spot among Law360's Technology Groups of the Year.

  • February 15, 2019

    Ex-Cognizant Execs Charged With $2M Indian Bribe Scheme

    Federal prosecutors and regulators handed down parallel criminal and civil charges on Friday for the former president and chief legal officer of Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp., accusing them of participating in a scheme to bribe an Indian official $2 million for permission to move forward on a construction project.

  • February 15, 2019

    Allen & Overy, Gleiss Steer €4.9B PE Takeover Of Scout24

    Private equity firms Hellman & Friedman LLC and The Blackstone Group LP on Friday inked a roughly €4.9 billion ($5.5 billion) agreement to buy Scout24 Ag, which runs online marketplaces serving the real estate and automotive sectors in Germany and other European countries, in a deal guided by Allen & Overy LLP and Gleiss Lutz.

  • February 15, 2019

    March Deadline Stays Put As US-China Trade Talks Trudge On

    The Trump administration wrapped up its latest round of trade negotiations with China on Friday and held firm to a March 1 deadline to raise tariffs on Beijing if no deal is struck, with the two sides beginning to sketch out the structure, if not the substance, of a new understanding on trade.

  • February 14, 2019

    Dockless Scooter Co. Blamed For Fla. Woman's Brain Injury

    Dockless scooter company Lime is accused of instructing users to not ride their scooters on sidewalks, in violation of a Florida city ordinance, which caused a 27-year-old woman to suffer a traumatic brain injury when she was hit by a car, according to a suit filed Thursday in state court.

  • February 14, 2019

    Execs Slam Iancu’s 'Downplaying' Of Patent Troll Concerns

    Executives at nearly two dozen companies, including Patreon and Foursquare, as well as podcaster Marc Maron, penned a letter to U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Andrei Iancu Thursday, bashing him for a speech in which he said that complaining about patent trolls is harmful to innovation.

  • February 14, 2019

    Oracle Seeks Win In Protest Over $10B JEDI Cloud Deal

    Oracle has asked the Court of Federal Claims to grant it judgment in its protest over the U.S. Department of Defense’s contentious $10 billion JEDI cloud procurement, arguing the deal was deliberately structured to restrict competition and that the DOD hasn’t properly investigated related conflicts of interest.

Expert Analysis

  • State Net

    States May Take The Lead On Regulating AI

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    While artificial intelligence promises to revolutionize the way we live and work, there has been relatively little government regulation targeting it specifically. But legislation referring to AI is currently pending in at least 13 states, and more may be on the way, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Austin's Blockchain For The Homeless Faces Challenges

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    The city of Austin, Texas, has proposed a program using blockchain technology to connect homeless residents with their health and identity records. Creating the infrastructure for the project will not be difficult, but key questions include whether the homeless will participate and how they can access their information, says Edward Block of Foley & Lardner LLP.

  • 5 Considerations For Both Sides In Stadium Naming Deals

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    The stadium and arena naming rights deal market remains highly active. The complexity of these agreements and the importance of the terms are growing, say Ryan Davis and Steve Smith of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • Recent Trends In FTC Consumer Protection Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission is focusing its enforcement efforts on financial services, web services and emerging technologies, data security and consumer privacy, telecommunications, and health care — these five areas represented 88 percent of consumer protection actions in 2017 and 2018, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

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    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Smith Camp Reviews 'Echo Of Its Time'

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    "Echo of Its Time" is the story of Nebraska’s federal district court from statehood in 1867 to the demise of Prohibition in 1933. Professors John Wunder and Mark Scherer have written an objective, unsentimental and insightful history, layered with context and rich in character study, says U.S. District Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska.

  • ADEA Protections For Outside Applicants Still Up In The Air

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    While the Seventh Circuit's recent decision in Kleber v. CareFusion is a victory for employers, the issue of whether the Age Discrimination in Employment Act permits outside job applicants to bring disparate impact claims is far from settled, as other circuits have yet to weigh in, say Jill Lashay and Curtis Schaffner of Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC.

  • Driverless Car Bill Stalls In Congress, So States Gear Up

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    The 115th Congress failed to pass legislation regulating autonomous vehicles, and it is unlikely that the U.S. Department of Transportation will restrict AV development under the Trump administration, so more regulation will occur at the state level, say Bethany Gullman of Faegre Baker Daniels and Theodore Bristol of Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting.

  • The Role Of Data Analytics In Mass Torts

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    Lawyers involved in a mass tort must make difficult decisions concerning the potential size of the claimant pool, the expected percentage of qualifying cases, the likelihood of a settlement and more. Data analytics can help guide mass tort strategies and yield better outcomes, say Deb Zonies and Mark Zabel of litigation support services provider Verus LLC.

  • GDPR's Targeted Marketing Rules Reach Beyond Google

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    A recent action by the Bavarian data protection authority potentially signals that cookies, user tracking and online advertising are not only tech industry issues, but instead a priority for all companies — and one that can carry the risk of an EU General Data Protection Regulation fine, say attorneys with Alston & Bird LLP.