Technology

  • February 22, 2018

    Palantir Ordered To Turn Over Books, Records To Investor

    The bitter feud between Palantir Technologies Inc. and an early investor accused of stealing its trade secrets took another turn on Thursday after the Delaware Chancery Court ruled the secretive data analysis company must turn over internal information to KT4 Partners LLC.

  • February 22, 2018

    Judge Wants Class Attys' Billing Records In Qualcomm Row

    A California federal judge overseeing antitrust claims related to Qualcomm’s patent licensing practices asked attorneys for a putative class of chip buyers to hand over billing records while the case is ongoing, saying that although such records are typically reviewed at litigation’s end, “that is kind of too late” to ensure good-faith billing.

  • February 22, 2018

    Facebook Shouldn't Expect 'Fake News' Legal Woes, For Now

    Social media sites are facing heightened scrutiny amid charges that an army of Russia-based “bot” accounts meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, but companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google are largely immune from liability even if they unwittingly help spread propaganda, attorneys say.

  • February 22, 2018

    Capacitor Biz Faces Restitution For Price-Fixing Scheme

    A California federal judge on Wednesday shot down a request by the federal government and Elna Co. Ltd., deemed a small player in a capacitor price-fixing scheme, to take criminal restitution off the table, saying direct purchaser victims had a payment priority and Elna had not demonstrated inability to pay.

  • February 22, 2018

    Uber Defeats NYC Drivers' Collective Action Bid — For Now

    A federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid by New York City drivers to certify a suit against Uber Technologies Inc. for alleged overtime and minimum wage law violations as a collective action, saying that almost all the relevant legal factors cut in the company's favor.

  • February 22, 2018

    FCC Faces Heat On Proposed Lifeline Subsidy Reforms

    The Federal Communications Commission fielded a bevy of comments on its proposals to reform the Lifeline phone subsidy program for low-income households ahead of Thursday’s deadline, with many blasting a ban on wireless services that rent infrastructure.

  • February 22, 2018

    Ex-Tech Co. CEO Admits Insider Trading In Co.'s Securities

    The former head of a Silicon Valley-based fiber optics company that Corning Inc. bought for more than $300 million in April 2016 has pled guilty to insider trading and tender offer fraud, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

  • February 22, 2018

    Citing Aruba Appraisal Appeal, Attorney Seeks Dell Reset

    The lead counsel in three Delaware post-merger stock price challenges that failed to win higher prices urged a vice chancellor Thursday to stay two earlier, remanded cases pending appeal of the latest, or to reopen the appraisal case record for Dell’s $25 billion go-private deal in 2013.

  • February 22, 2018

    Google Hit With New Lawsuit Stemming From Damore Memo

    A former Google engineer on Wednesday accused the company in California state court of retaliating against him for expressing political opinions, including firing him after he took a strong stance against the opinions expressed in a now-public memo by fellow former employee James Damore.

  • February 22, 2018

    Comcast, Verizon Fight Fed. Circ. Redo After Alice Patent Win

    Comcast and Verizon urged the Federal Circuit on Wednesday not to rehear claims by Two-Way Media over four invalidated streaming media patents, saying the panel decision does not contradict Federal Circuit precedent and that en banc review is not warranted.

  • February 22, 2018

    Net Neutrality Challenges Roll In After Rule Publication

    Official net neutrality lawsuits started to rain on federal courts Thursday along with the divisive Restoring Internet Freedom rule’s publication in the Federal Register, with the rule stating an effective date of April 23 for the deregulation.

  • February 22, 2018

    Qualcomm Blasts FTC's Special Master Bid In Antitrust Suit

    Qualcomm Inc. slammed the Federal Trade Commission’s request to have a special master appointed in an antitrust suit over the company’s licensing practices for standard-essential patents on Wednesday, telling a California federal judge that such a move would only complicate discovery proceedings set to close next month.

  • February 22, 2018

    Pa. Appeals Court Won't Revive USA Tech Derivative Suit

    A Pennsylvania appeals court said Thursday it would not revive a derivative lawsuit over inflated income reports by payment processor USA Technology Inc. as a result of the company’s failure to properly account for uncollectible debts from customers.

  • February 22, 2018

    3rd Circ. OKs FBI Malware Warrant In Child Porn Case

    The Third Circuit said Wednesday that a magistrate judge overstepped her authority when she let the FBI use malware to identify suspects in a massive child pornography sting, but broke new legal ground by ruling that the evidence was allowed because law enforcement had obtained the search warrant in good faith.

  • February 22, 2018

    Google's PTAB Loss On Ad Patents Affirmed At Fed. Circ.

    Google LLC took a hit Thursday when the Federal Circuit affirmed decisions from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board that upheld claims in two advertising technology patents that the company has been accused of infringing, rejecting its argument that the claims were obvious.

  • February 22, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: Michael Dell, 601W, JDS

    Michael Dell is reportedly the mystery $100.47 million buyer of a Manhattan penthouse, developer 601W is said to have picked up a site in Chicago for $34 million, and a JDS Development venture has reportedly scored $91 million in financing for a New York condo project.

  • February 22, 2018

    Qualcomm Slams Broadcom's Board Picks In Buyout Fight

    Qualcomm urged shareholders on Thursday to back its incumbent directors over Broadcom’s slate of nominees, contending that new directors would not change the board’s opinion that Broadcom’s recently reduced buyout offer is “inadequate.”

  • February 22, 2018

    Studios Trim But Can't Toss IP Suit Over Visual Effects

    A California federal judge Wednesday trimmed copyright infringement claims against Disney, Paramount and Fox but declined to dismiss claims that Disney’s blockbuster films infringed the patents of a visual effects company and that all three studios violated its trademarks.

  • February 22, 2018

    Rulemaking On Speedy Tech Approval Raises Hackles At FCC

    The Federal Communications Commission took steps to expedite reviews for emerging communications technologies at its February open meeting on Thursday, teeing up a public comment period over objections that the FCC is detrimentally positioning itself as a gatekeeper for innovation.

  • February 22, 2018

    Ex-Andrews Kurth IP Partner Joins Haug Partners In NY

    Haug Partners LLP has announced that it has bolstered its New York office with the addition of a former Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP attorney who specializes in intellectual property litigation.

Expert Analysis

  • Net Neutrality Repeal May Put Tech Startups In The Slow Lane

    Benjamin Warlick

    There is no telling how the current battle over net neutrality will play out, but there is a good chance that paid prioritization will not go away. Technology and content startups that do not have the resources to buy internet fast lanes may lose sales from slower traffic, says Benjamin Warlick of Morris Manning & Martin LLP.

  • A Recurring Problem In Patentability Of Computer Software

    Benjamin Hattenbach

    In its discussion of the "abstract ideas" exception, Alice relied on Bilski. But the historical precedent cited by Bilski does not support the current patent regime. Courts should return to a clear delineation between patent-ineligible laws of nature and mathematical expressions thereof, and patent-eligible novel and useful inventions made by man, say Benjamin Hattenbach and Rosalyn Kautz of Irell & Manella LLP.

  • The FTC’s Quest For Better Influencer Disclosures

    Julie O’Neill

    Given the repetition of the Federal Trade Commission's message concerning its endorsement guides, it's apparent that the agency believes it is still not being heard. Julie O’Neill and Adam Fleisher of Morrison & Foerster LLP recount how the FTC has gotten to where it is today and, thus, why it might be heading for a celebrity enforcement action next.

  • What Employers Can Learn From Waymo V. Uber

    Brian Arbetter

    While Waymo v. Uber was more high-profile than most cases, employers can and should learn lessons from it. Brian Arbetter of Norton Rose Fulbright discusses the current state of the law in the area of employee raiding and restrictive covenants and offers some best practices for employers to follow in order to fully protect their confidential information.

  • California's Evolving Standard On Expert Opinion Evidence

    Peter Choate

    A California appeals court's recent decision in Apple v. Superior Court explicitly holds that the Sargon standard applies when a party seeks to admit expert opinion evidence. Practitioners should seek to preserve this issue for appeal and urge the California Supreme Court to resolve it, say Peter Choate and William Dance of Tucker Ellis LLP.

  • Opinion

    Gig Economy Business Model Skirts Calif. Labor Laws

    Mike Arias

    California workers have spent over a century carving out the rights to have fair working conditions, an eight-hour work day and to be paid a living wage. The gig economy largely seeks to circumvent these well-established laws, says Mike Arias of Arias Sanguinetti Wang & Torrijos LLP.

  • Observations On Delaware Appraisal In A Post-Dell World

    John Hughes

    It is too early to assess the full reach that Dell will have on appraisal in Delaware. But the Delaware Chancery Court's ruling last week in Verition Partners v. Aruba Networks provides a first look, say John Hughes and Jack Jacobs of Sidley Austin LLP.

  • Autonomous Drones: Set To Fly, But May Not Comply

    Sara Baxenberg

    A California company has unveiled a fully autonomous "selfie" drone, which promises to stay trained on a moving subject, capturing footage while avoiding any obstacles. But a drone that flies itself may run afoul of a number of Federal Aviation Administration regulations, even if it has fancy obstacle detection and personal tracking, say Sara Baxenberg and Joshua Turner of Wiley Rein LLP.

  • A Look At US And EU Fintech Regulatory Frameworks

    Brian Christiansen

    The regulatory fragmentation on the federal level, and at the U.S. state and EU member state levels, presents challenges and uncertainty for many fintech companies. The resolution of these uncertainties will directly impact the evolution of this sector, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Delaware May Be The Right Jurisdiction For 'Smart' Orgs

    Matthew O’Toole

    As distributed ledgers and blockchains emerge as means for processing and recording corporate and commercial transactions, the Delaware LLC may become an attractive organizational form for next-generation "decentralized autonomous organizations," say attorneys with Potter Anderson Corroon LLP.