Technology

  • February 21, 2018

    Westinghouse Cleared To Solicit Votes On Ch. 11 Plan

    Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC received approval Wednesday from a New York bankruptcy court to distribute its restructuring plan solicitation materials to creditors, keeping the distressed nuclear technology and contracting giant on track to confirm its plan by the end of March.

  • February 21, 2018

    Surgical Robotics Co. Reaps $118M In Private Financing

    Privately held surgical robotics company Procept BioRobotics said on Wednesday that it had secured $118 million in equity financing from a funding round led by a new investor, Connecticut-based hedge fund Viking Global Investors LP.

  • February 21, 2018

    Duo Settles With SEC For Selling Outlandish Patent Stocks

    Two Florida men facing fraud charges settled a related case with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Wednesday, agreeing to be barred from penny stock offerings and securities trading to resolve civil claims that they pilfered $2.5 million selling penny stocks based on dubious nanotechnology patents.

  • February 21, 2018

    From NJ To Texas: How The Courts Fared At The Fed. Circ.

    The differences between the Federal Circuit’s most-reversed and least-reversed district courts run far deeper than their success rates on appeal — a metric that can vary widely throughout the judiciary, according to Law360’s look at three years of Federal Circuit cases.

  • February 21, 2018

    Huawei Fights Samsung Bid To Block China Patent Injunction

    Huawei Technologies Co. on Tuesday slammed Samsung's bid to block an injunction issued in China last month barring the South Korean company from selling smartphones that infringe two Huawei patents, calling Samsung's request to a California federal judge “extraordinary.”

  • February 21, 2018

    Broadcom Lowers Qualcomm Bid After Sweetened NXP Offer

    Broadcom Ltd. on Wednesday lowered its takeover bid for Qualcomm Inc. from $82 per share to $79 per share in response to Qualcomm’s decision to increase its offer for NXP Semiconductors NV by more than $6 billion, but Broadcom reaffirmed that it is still committed to acquiring the California chipmaker.

  • February 21, 2018

    Apple Says Batteries Piling Up In IPhone Slowdown Suits

    Apple Inc. urged a California federal judge Wednesday to find it doesn’t need to hold onto every battery it replaces from iPhones in a slew of proposed class actions alleging it misled consumers by slowing phones with diminished battery capacities, arguing that preserving every battery poses health and environmental hazards.

  • February 21, 2018

    FCC's Net Neutrality Deregulation Hits Next Milestone

    The Federal Communications Commission’s rollback of Obama-era net neutrality rules will move closer to taking effect Thursday, paving the way for official legal challenges and tripping the shot clock for a Congressional vote that could nullify the rule change.

  • February 21, 2018

    DOJ Antitrust Chief Wants Closer IP Enforcement With EU

    U.S. Department of Justice antitrust division chief Makan Delrahim argued in a speech Wednesday at the College of Europe in Brugge, Belgium, for a closing of the enforcement policy gap between U.S. and European authorities on matters of intellectual property and treatment of “unilateral conduct” by individual companies.

  • February 21, 2018

    Sonos Gets Judge To Kill Home Audio Patent Under Alice

    A Delaware federal judge on Tuesday invalidated a home audio patent that D&M Holdings accuses rival Sonos of infringing, saying the invention is routine and conventional in one of the first decisions to apply new Federal Circuit rules for such summary judgment motions.

  • February 21, 2018

    Google Advertiser Gets 5th Try At Click-Fraud Class Action

    A California federal judge Tuesday tossed a businessman’s fourth version of a putative class action alleging Google understates the fraudulent clicks its ads receive, saying he hadn’t shown charges for invalid ad views but the “interests of justice” supported allowing him to submit another amended complaint.

  • February 21, 2018

    Bitfunder Boss Charged With Lying About $70M Bitcoin Heist

    Alternative currency purveyor Jon E. Montroll lied to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after hackers stole 6,000 bitcoins, today worth nearly $70 million, from his WeExchange and Bitfunder.com businesses in 2013, according to criminal charges unsealed Wednesday in Manhattan federal court.

  • February 21, 2018

    Public Transit Tech Co. Moovit Nabs $50M From Investors

    Public transit application maker Moovit App Global Ltd. scored $50 million from a recent funding round led by Intel Capital and including the venture capital arm of BMW, as the company looks to expand and improve its existing platform and add to its global sales team.

  • February 21, 2018

    Top 10 Reads From Telecom Attys' Bookshelves For 2018

    With so much activity in the telecommunications sector — from pending net neutrality challenges to budget woes to Congressional gridlock — it’s easy for rest and recreation to take a back seat. But Law360 has a prescription to cure burnout and winter blues: a healthy dose of peer-recommended literature.

  • February 21, 2018

    Temenos Expands Fintech Service With $1.9B Fidessa Merger

    United Kingdom-based capital markets software provider Fidessa Group PLC has been acquired by Swiss banking software company Temenos AG for £1.43 billion ($1.99 billion), the companies said Wednesday.

  • February 20, 2018

    DOJ Will Form Cybersecurity Task Force

    In the wake of numerous high profile hacks, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday that it will form a Cyber-Digital Task Force aimed at combating a global cyber threat.

  • February 20, 2018

    DOD Focus On ‘Other Transactions’ Shows Big Year Ahead

    After many years of being ignored as a pathway for bringing commercial technology vendors aboard, Other Transaction Authority has gained traction thanks to recent statutory changes and a renewed focus from the U.S. Department of Defense, making 2018 potentially the biggest year yet for the DOD’s use of it.

  • February 20, 2018

    EU Tees Up New Measures To Tax The Digital Economy

    The European Union is preparing to unveil proposals aimed at taxing the digital economy, including measures targeting tech companies that don’t have a physical presence in member states where they provide services, an EU official announced Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2018

    Swarmify Can’t Point To Trade Secret, CloudFlare GC Says

    During the sealed portion of a hearing last week, the video streaming startup Swarmify “was unable to articulate a protectable trade secret” stolen by CloudFlare, the company’s general counsel told Law360 Tuesday, after a California federal judge said he could respond to Swarmify's public statements about the closed session.

  • February 20, 2018

    Fed. Circ. OKs Killing Money Transfer Patent Under Alice

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday upheld U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap’s decision to invalidate claims in four Integrated Technological Systems Inc. patents tied to money transfers in the newest of several high-profile decisions over how to interpret the U.S. Supreme Court’s Alice test.

Expert Analysis

  • What Employers Can Learn From Waymo V. Uber

    Brian Arbetter

    While Waymo v. Uber was more high-profile than most cases, employers can and should learn lessons from it. Brian Arbetter of Norton Rose Fulbright discusses the current state of the law in the area of employee raiding and restrictive covenants and offers some best practices for employers to follow in order to fully protect their confidential information.

  • California's Evolving Standard On Expert Opinion Evidence

    Peter Choate

    A California appeals court's recent decision in Apple v. Superior Court explicitly holds that the Sargon standard applies when a party seeks to admit expert opinion evidence. Practitioners should seek to preserve this issue for appeal and urge the California Supreme Court to resolve it, say Peter Choate and William Dance of Tucker Ellis LLP.

  • Opinion

    Gig Economy Business Model Skirts Calif. Labor Laws

    Mike Arias

    California workers have spent over a century carving out the rights to have fair working conditions, an eight-hour work day and to be paid a living wage. The gig economy largely seeks to circumvent these well-established laws, says Mike Arias of Arias Sanguinetti Wang & Torrijos LLP.

  • Observations On Delaware Appraisal In A Post-Dell World

    John Hughes

    It is too early to assess the full reach that Dell will have on appraisal in Delaware. But the Delaware Chancery Court's ruling last week in Verition Partners v. Aruba Networks provides a first look, say John Hughes and Jack Jacobs of Sidley Austin LLP.

  • Autonomous Drones: Set To Fly, But May Not Comply

    Sara Baxenberg

    A California company has unveiled a fully autonomous "selfie" drone, which promises to stay trained on a moving subject, capturing footage while avoiding any obstacles. But a drone that flies itself may run afoul of a number of Federal Aviation Administration regulations, even if it has fancy obstacle detection and personal tracking, say Sara Baxenberg and Joshua Turner of Wiley Rein LLP.

  • A Look At US And EU Fintech Regulatory Frameworks

    Brian Christiansen

    The regulatory fragmentation on the federal level, and at the U.S. state and EU member state levels, presents challenges and uncertainty for many fintech companies. The resolution of these uncertainties will directly impact the evolution of this sector, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Delaware May Be The Right Jurisdiction For 'Smart' Orgs

    Matthew O’Toole

    As distributed ledgers and blockchains emerge as means for processing and recording corporate and commercial transactions, the Delaware LLC may become an attractive organizational form for next-generation "decentralized autonomous organizations," say attorneys with Potter Anderson Corroon LLP.

  • How Emerging Sources Of ESI Will Impact Discovery

    Charles McGee

    Late last year, the Sedona Conference released the third edition of its principles addressing electronic document production, updated to account for innovations like Snapchat and Twitter. It may be necessary for these principles to be updated more often in order to keep pace with technology, says Charles McGee III of Murphy & McGonigle LLP.

  • Put The Brakes On Acceleration Bay Litigation Funder Ruling

    David Gallagher

    Last week, the District of Delaware raised eyebrows by ruling that documents provided to a litigation funder and its counsel in connection with their due diligence are categorically not attorney work product. Acceleration Bay v. Activision Blizzard seems to be a case of bad facts making bad law, says David Gallagher, investment manager and legal counsel for Bentham IMF.

  • Worker Classification Questions Remain Post-GrubHub Win

    Art Lambert

    A California federal judge implied that her recent decision in Lawson v. GrubHub was a close call, which suggests there is a tipping point where a driver moves from the independent contractor classification to the employee classification. However, when exactly that happens is still up in the air, says Art Lambert of Fisher Phillips.