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Technology

  • June 24, 2019

    S&C, Sheppard Mullin Steer Insight’s $581M PCM Tie-Up

    Technology solutions business Insight Enterprises on Monday said it will pay $581 million to take over hardware, software and technology services firm PCM, with Sullivan & Cromwell and Sheppard Mullin steering the buyer and seller, respectively.

  • June 24, 2019

    Gunderson Steers Lending Tech Biz Blend’s $130M Fundraise

    Digital lending technology platform Blend on Monday said a slate of investors including Temasek and General Atlantic poured in $130 million through a funding round steered by Gunderson Dettmer as the company looks to improve the loan process, build its product lineup and hire new talent.

  • June 24, 2019

    High Court To Examine Appeals Of PTAB Time-Bar Rulings

    The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday it will consider whether the Federal Circuit can review Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions about the timeliness of a patent challenge, agreeing to hear a case brought by the parent company of YellowPages.com.

  • June 21, 2019

    Commerce Dept. Blacklists 5 More Chinese Tech Entities

    Citing apparent risks to national security, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced Friday that it has added four more Chinese technology companies and one institute to a running blacklist that already includes Huawei, restricting their ability to buy American technology without written permission.

  • June 21, 2019

    Facebook Wins Trim Of Most Data Breach Claims, For Now

    A California federal judge on Friday granted in part and denied in part Facebook's attempt to kill consolidated litigation over a data breach that affected nearly 50 million of its user accounts, cutting the bulk of users' claims but giving both named plaintiffs leave to amend.

  • June 21, 2019

    Lawmakers, Agencies Agree: Broadband Maps Must Be Better

    A surprising number of lawmakers and regulators are currently working a number of angles to improve the underlying maps that reveal where broadband service exists, including legislation and overhaul plans at the Federal Communications Commission to correct sometimes wildly inaccurate data.

  • June 21, 2019

    Amazon Driver's Labor Claims Delivered To Arbitration

    A California federal judge on Friday ordered an Amazon delivery driver to arbitrate claims that the retail behemoth shorted her wages, meals and rest periods, putting her proposed class action on hold while an arbitrator considers the allegations.

  • June 21, 2019

    Police, Firefighters Must Stay In Spectrum's T-Band, GAO Says

    Law enforcement and emergency services should not be booted from the slice of radio spectrum known as the T-band when it gets auctioned off in 2021, because some major metropolitan cities don’t have an alternative, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said Friday.

  • June 21, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Label, SAP Qualtrics, Churchill

    Developer Label & Co. has reportedly bought 63 acres in Florida for $10.28 million, SAP Qualtrics is said to be leasing 300,000 square feet in Seattle and Churchill Real Estate has reportedly landed $52 million in financing for a Manhattan mixed-use building.

  • June 21, 2019

    FTC Says Qualcomm's New Arguments Too Late In Stay Fight

    The Federal Trade Commission has urged a California federal judge to disregard a pair of Qualcomm arguments, which the agency says are being raised for the first time, in the chipmaker's push to halt a court order that would upend its licensing practices.

  • June 21, 2019

    Quest, Customs Breaches Show Risks Of Farming Out Data

    Data breaches revealed this month by blood-testing giant Quest Diagnostics Inc. and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency illustrate the legal and reputational risks of relying on vulnerable third-party vendors to handle sensitive information.

  • June 21, 2019

    Lawmakers Want To Know How Tech Cos. Hire Diverse Attys

    A group of Democratic lawmakers on Friday asked Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and other top tech companies to provide Congress with detailed information on their policies and procedures for retaining outside attorneys of diverse backgrounds.

  • June 21, 2019

    Dozen Firms Guide 9 IPOs Exceeding $2B To End June

    Twelve firms will steer nine initial public offerings that could surpass $2 billion during the coming week, potentially ending June with a bang as a wide gamut of issuers seeks to capitalize on a vibrant IPO market.

  • June 21, 2019

    Crypto Enforcement A Priority For DOJ Tax Team, Atty Says

    Enforcing tax laws surrounding cryptocurrency will continue to be a priority for the U.S. Department of Justice’s Tax Division, a lead attorney with the agency said Friday.

  • June 21, 2019

    FTC Said To Investigate YouTube Over Child Privacy Concerns

    Sen. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., has welcomed the possibility of a Federal Trade Commission investigation into potential child privacy violations by YouTube, following media reports that the agency is looking into the streaming site's data collection practices.

  • June 21, 2019

    Three Times Zero Still Zero, Optics Co. Says Of IP Suit Award

    Japanese optics maker Hamamatsu is attempting to dismantle efforts by a Harvard-backed company to add $3 million on top of a $1.4 million jury verdict finding it stole "black silicon" technology created by a Harvard professor, saying the extra damages are based on nothing — literally.

  • June 21, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Backs PTAB Win For 'Warcraft' Game Maker

    The Federal Circuit on Friday invalidated a patent covering technology for customizing characters in an online game, upholding the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision in a challenge led by Activision Blizzard Inc.

  • June 21, 2019

    Regulators Needn't Heed 5G Fearmongers, FCC's Pai Says

    Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai told the New York State Wireless Association on Friday that concerns that auctioning off the 24 GHz band for 5G use would interfere with weather forecasting activities are misguided and should not inhibit 5G deployment.

  • June 21, 2019

    Verizon Gets PTAB To Ax Mobile Advertising Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has invalidated a full Bridge and Post Inc. patent covering a method of targeting advertisements on mobile devices, following a challenge by Verizon Wireless.

  • June 21, 2019

    Journalist Wants To End 'Shitty Media Men' Libel Case

    Journalist Moira Donegan is asking a federal judge to end a libel lawsuit filed over her creation of a list of “Shitty Media Men” who have been accused of sexual misconduct, saying she’s shielded by the First Amendment.

  • June 21, 2019

    FERC Approves Boost In Grid Cybersecurity Standards

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has signed off on tighter electric grid cybersecurity standards that expand the scope of hacker attacks utilities and other system operators must report to grid reliability regulators and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

  • June 21, 2019

    PE Firm Brings In Nearly $100M For Israeli Tech Fund

    European co-investment company Maor said Friday it closed its first fund after raising nearly $100 million from Rothschild & Co. and private backers for investments targeting Israeli tech companies.

  • June 21, 2019

    Cray Investor Challenges $1.3B Sale To Hewlett Packard

    A Cray Inc. investor is claiming the supercomputer company's proposed $1.3 billion sale to Hewlett Packard Enterprise is "tainted" by conflicts of interest and a lack of information necessary for stockholders to cast informed votes on the proposal.

  • June 21, 2019

    Inuvo Scraps Planned $75.5M Deal For ConversionPoint

    Inuvo and ConversionPoint Technologies said Thursday they're calling off a previously announced deal under which Inuvo would have acquired the California-based e-commerce technology company for roughly $75.5 million.

  • June 21, 2019

    Apple Sued Over Alleged IPad Battery Fire In NJ Apartment

    The manager of an apartment complex is suing Apple Inc. in New Jersey federal court, claiming that defective and unsafe lithium batteries in one of the tech company’s iPad tablets spontaneously caught fire, damaging the complex and killing a resident.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 E-Discovery Takeaways From FTC V. Qualcomm

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    The recent Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm antitrust trial provides two very good reasons to make sure your e-discovery strategy is coordinated with your trial strategy from the start of the case, say Gareth Evans and Ben Barnes of Redgrave.

  • Internal Inconsistencies Limit Design Patent Decision's Utility

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    Although a California federal court's recent decision in Kao v. Snow Monster may seem to offer a multipurpose tool for petitioners in design patent cases, it may not be dependable authority, at least on a few issues, says Jeremy Kriegel of Marshall Gerstein.

  • What Coons And Tillis Learned At Patent Reform Hearings

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    Three recent patent law hearings with testimony from 45 witnesses reinforced what we’ve heard for years — that the U.S. patent eligibility system is broken and desperately needs to be repaired. Several points stood out, say Sens. Chris Coons and Thom Tillis, who head the Senate’s intellectual property subcommittee.

  • A Look At US Data Privacy Laws 1 Year After GDPR

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    While Congress appears reluctant to address a uniform consumer data privacy law, a patchwork quilt of state privacy laws is taking shape across the U.S., drawing from many of the concepts set forth in the EU's General Data Protection Regulation last year, say Bob Bowman and David Stauss of Husch Blackwell.

  • Digital Data Privacy One Year After Carpenter

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    Lower courts have begun to grapple with the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Carpenter v. United States, which concerned the constitutional limits on government acquisitions of digital data. On the anniversary of the decision, Jonathan Cedarbaum, Nina Cahill and Sam McHale of WilmerHale analyze defendants' attempts to extend Carpenter's holding.

  • How New US M&A Restrictions On China Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    The Trump administration recently launched an unprecedented regulatory blitz designed to further protect domestic information and communications technology and services from what it considers Chinese threats. These steps will constrain transactions that could expand China’s access to the U.S. market and to U.S. technology — and some have an immediate effect, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • What The IRS' New Cryptocurrency Guidance Should Address

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    The IRS recently announced it will be revising it's 2014 guidance on taxation of cryptocurrency. Hopefully the new rules will establish a fairer method of determining cost basis and demystify other tax consequences arising from cryptocurrency transactions, says Sean Ryan of blockchain accounting software firm NODE40.

  • A Look At China's New Cybersecurity Guidance

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    Businesses providing services over the internet are likely to face continued challenges to comply with the expanding implementation of China's cybersecurity law, especially with respect to broadening definitions of personal information holders under new guidance, say Xiaoyan Zhang and Vincent James Barbuto of Reed Smith.

  • Perspectives

    Border Phone Search Questions Continue In Federal Court

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    A Massachusetts federal court's eventual decision on cellphone searches at the U.S. border in Alasaad v. Nielsen will further illustrate the differences in how federal courts apply the U.S. Supreme Court's 2014 decision in Riley v. California to the warrant-requirement exception for border searches, says Sharon Barney at Leech Tishman.

  • 9th Circ. Got Cost-Sharing Right In Altera V. Commissioner

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    The problem underlying the Ninth Circuit’s recent Altera v. Commissioner decision is one that has long bedeviled courts considering how multinational companies should share tax costs: how to determine what unrelated parties would have done at arm’s length when comparables cannot be found, says Reuven Avi-Yonah at the University of Michigan.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • Evaluating Stand-Alone Privilege For Cybersecurity Info

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    In a new commentary, the Sedona Conference considers shielding cybersecurity information from discovery with the attorney-client privilege and work-product protection. Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher of Pepper Hamilton query whether it makes sense to single out cybersecurity information for reform. 

  • FCC's New Call-Blocking Ruling Necessitates More Oversight

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    While the Federal Communications Commission's recent ruling authorizing phone carriers to block unwanted calls is a laudable effort, the lack of any industry call-blocking standards or appreciable oversight is a cause of massive concern for many callers who do not know whether their calls will be connecting, says Eric Troutman of Squire Patton.

  • LightYear Is FTC's Data Security Warning To B2B Companies

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    The Federal Trade Commission's data security settlement with LightYear Dealer Technologies is notable because the company does not market or sell products directly to consumers, and because the FTC made the eyebrow-raising claim that LightYear is a financial institution under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, say attorneys at ZwillGen.

  • The State Of Article III Standing 3 Years After Spokeo

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    Three years after the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark consumer privacy decision in Spokeo v. Robins, Mary-Christine Sungaila and Marco Pulido at Haynes and Boone examine how courts have applied the opinion, the role of congressional findings in Article III standing cases, and a developing litigation trend.