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Technology

  • October 15, 2018

    High Court Passes On Media Streaming Patent Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it would not review a case against Comcast and Verizon over media streaming patents, leaving in place a ruling that found the patents were invalid for claiming nothing more than an abstract idea.

  • October 15, 2018

    Sens. OK Privacy Board Picks Ahead Of EU Data Deal Review

    The U.S. Senate has confirmed three nominees to the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, allowing the agency to get back to monitoring federal surveillance programs for the first time since President Donald Trump took office and coming just days before a key review of the U.S.-EU Privacy Shield.

  • October 15, 2018

    Uber Failed To Prove Location Tracking Patent Invalid: PTAB

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has upheld two X One Inc. patents on location tracking technology, with the board finding that the claims challenged by Uber Technologies Inc. were not obvious in light of prior art.

  • October 15, 2018

    Wabtec Seeks To Block Siemens From Accessing Train Tech

    Westinghouse Air Brake Technologies Corp. sought an injunction in Pennsylvania state court Monday to stop competitor Siemens Mobility Inc. from having access to its technology through a shared client, CSX Transportation, for whom both companies are developing an automated system for signaling and controlling trains.

  • October 15, 2018

    ITC Bans Toshiba Memory Device Imports That Crib US Patent

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has banned Toshiba Corp. from importing certain memory devices that rip off Taiwan-based Macronix International Co. Ltd.’s patented semiconductor technology, reversing an earlier finding by an administrative law judge that the Japanese electronics giant’s imports did not violate tariff laws, according to a Monday notice in the Federal Register.

  • October 15, 2018

    Glilot Closes AI, Cybersecurity-Focused Fund With $110M

    Venture capital fund Glilot Capital Partners said on Monday that it has closed its third fund with $110 million in contributions that will be used to invest in Israel-based early-stage startups focusing on artificial intelligence, big data and cybersecurity.

  • October 12, 2018

    Will The Future Of The Supreme Court Bar Be Female?

    While women have made significant inroads into the elite world of U.S. Supreme Court advocacy, last term the number of women arguing at the court hit a decade low. Was it an off year? Or a sign of progress stalled? (This article is the first in a series examining the gender gap among high court advocates.)

  • October 12, 2018

    Supreme Court Women: A Vet & 1st-Timer Talk Gender Disparity

    In exclusive on-camera interviews with Law360, the most prolific female U.S. Supreme Court advocate of the past decade and a first-timer reflect on the status of women in a field still dominated by men. (This article is part of a series examining the gender gap among high court advocates.)

  • October 12, 2018

    Web's Sophistication Doesn't Fit Title II Box, FCC Argues

    The Federal Communications Commission is building its case that it rightly overturned Obama-era net neutrality rules and changed the regulatory classification of web services, telling the D.C. Circuit in an opening brief that the internet's sophisticated functions are best described as a Title I information service instead of a Title II utility.

  • October 12, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen Deutsche Bank sue an Italian wealth management bank, several hotels lodge competition claims against Visa and MasterCard and the 200-year-old company behind British bank notes bring a pensions action against HSF. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • October 12, 2018

    PTAB Partly Axes Music Choice Patent In Row With Rival

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Thursday gave a partial win to Stingray Digital Group Inc. in its bitter patent fight with rival music channel provider Music Choice, finding that part of a Music Choice patent for on-demand entertainment systems is invalid as obvious.

  • October 12, 2018

    Broadcom Says EU OK'd $18.9B CA Inc. Deal

    Broadcom Inc.'s $18.9 billion buy of New York-based software company CA Inc. got the green light under the European Union's antitrust laws, clearing the way for the deal's closure by Nov. 5., Broadcom told the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday.

  • October 12, 2018

    ‘Cheerleading’ Not Fraud, HP Atty Tells Startup Trial Jury

    A Hewlett Packard Malaysia manager was merely "cheerleading" when she described possible future work to a startup that now claims it was duped into providing tens of millions of dollars in free services and software, HP's attorney argued Friday at the close of a California federal trial.

  • October 12, 2018

    Google Data Leak Exposes Breach Disclosure Conundrums

    Google is facing widespread backlash after the revelation of its decision not to notify the public of an incident that exposed 500,000 users' data, highlighting not only the tricky waters companies must navigate in breach disclosure deliberations, but also the importance of ensuring such discussions remain under wraps, attorneys say.

  • October 12, 2018

    Chinese Spy Denies He Tried To Steal GE Aviation IP

    A member of China's intelligence agency pled not guilty Friday to charges he attempted to gather trade secrets from jet engine manufacturer GE Aviation, but an Ohio federal judge said he should remain in prison until trial, citing inconsistent accounts about his employment.

  • October 12, 2018

    Fiat Taking A ‘Free Ride’ With Wireless Tech, Bluetooth Says

    Fiat Chrysler is selling cars it says are Bluetooth-compatible and is using the Bluetooth name in its marketing efforts without the tech company’s permission, according to a suit filed Thursday in Washington federal court.

  • October 12, 2018

    Insurer Can't Duck Yahoo's $4M Email Suit Coverage Row

    A California federal judge found on Friday that Yahoo's insurer largely failed to defend and indemnify the company for $4 million in attorneys' fees from multiple class actions accusing it of scanning customers' emails, but said it was up to a jury to decide whether the insurer's failures to come to Yahoo's aid were coverage errors or evidence of bad faith. 

  • October 12, 2018

    DOJ Says AT&T Can't Fix District Court's Errors

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday continued its bid to revive its challenge of AT&T Inc.'s purchase of Time Warner Inc., telling a D.C. Circuit panel that the company can't fix the economic and logical errors made by the lower court judge.

  • October 12, 2018

    Facebook Says 30M Users' Data Accessed In Recent Breach

    Facebook revealed Friday that hackers accessed a trove of sensitive data from nearly 30 million users, including search history and location information, in an unprecedented breach of its platform that has drawn regulators' attention.

  • October 12, 2018

    Telehealth Pilot Needn't Fund New Infrastructure, FCC Told

    Health care and broadband providers are urging the Federal Communications Commission to focus its $100 million telehealth pilot program on existing connections, as well as investing in internet-enabled applications and services, instead of using the program to build out new connections.

Expert Analysis

  • Kavanaugh Cannot Be Compelled To Recuse Himself

    Donald Scarinci

    Whether Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s prior statements may be grounds for disqualification when it comes to judging certain cases is debatable, but there are no specific recusal guidelines for the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices themselves don’t even agree on where to draw the line when it comes to perceived political bias, says Donald Scarinci, a founding partner of Scarinci Hollenbeck LLC.

  • 10 Questions The SEC Will Probably Ask Google: Part 1

    John Reed Stark

    With the announcement this week that a previously undisclosed software bug potentially exposed up to 500,000 Google+ users' personal data, Google has a problem. And the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is probably investigating, says John Reed Stark, former chief of the SEC's Office of Internet Enforcement.

  • Knowledge Management: An Unsung Hero Of Legal Innovation

    Rob MacAdam

    As technology evolves, law firms are increasingly looking for ways to improve communication, transparency and service for their clients. Firms should put knowledge management at the core of their value proposition to create a competitive advantage, says Rob MacAdam at HighQ.

  • Autonomous Ships: Coming Soon To A Port Near You

    Micah Dawson

    With almost 75 percent of marine liability losses being a result of human error, companies are increasingly interested in the development of autonomous ships. While fully autonomous vessels could offer a competitive advantage by allowing elimination of shipboard crew, hiring and training of capable shoreside support staff will be essential, says Micah Dawson of Fisher Phillips LLP.

  • What New Calif. Law Means For Connected Medical Devices

    Michael Buchanan

    Last month, California passed the first-ever state legislation aimed at regulating "internet of things" devices. The new law restricts liability to manufacturers of physical hardware — drawing a narrower line than the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's previous guidance, say Michael Buchanan and Michelle Bufano of Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP.

  • Hurdles Ahead For California's Female Director Mandate

    Teresa Johnson

    Many believe that California's new law requiring a minimum number of female directors at public companies is necessary. But the law also faces a number of criticisms, and its implementation may well be delayed or even blocked by constitutional challenges, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.

  • Why It’s Time To Rethink Illinois Brick

    Samuel Miller

    In Apple v. Pepper, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether iPhone owners who purchase apps from Apple’s app store should be considered “direct purchasers” under federal antitrust laws. The court should use this opportunity to reevaluate the direct purchaser analysis it established in Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, says Samuel Miller of UC Hastings Law School.

  • Do Facebook's Targeted Job Ads Violate Title VII?

    Kristen Sinisi

    For the past 50 years, Title VII issues related to classified employment ads arranged by sex remained relatively well-settled. However, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission charges against Facebook’s targeted advertising platform recently resurrected them, says Kristen Sinisi of Bernabei & Kabat PLLC.

  • Can Defrauded Crypto Investors Hope To Recover Anything?

    Brett Theisen

    While insolvencies and fraud in the cryptocurrency space will create many issues of first impression for the courts, some valuable lessons can be found in more traditional fraud cases, such as the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme, says Brett Theisen of Gibbons PC.

  • Opinion

    Skip The New 'Civility Courses' And Think Like A Lawyer

    Alex Dimitrief

    As we watch what passes for political discourse in our nation’s capital, it’s understandable that universities are launching programs on how to cope with ideological disputes. But our country needs fewer people who profess to be open-minded and more people who engage in and honor the conclusions of reasoned debates, says Alex Dimitrief of General Electric Co.