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Technology

  • August 10, 2018

    Apple Fights App Store Monopolization Claims At High Court

    Apple Inc. urged the U.S. Supreme Court in an opening brief on Friday to toss a proposed consumer class action claiming the technology giant illegally monopolized the iPhone app market, arguing that it acts merely as an agent for developers who set their own prices.

  • August 10, 2018

    Google Gets PTAB To Nix Claims Of Traffic Forecasting Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has nixed multiple claims in a patent related to real-time traffic forecasting technology, siding with Google that the patent claims are invalid as obvious.

  • August 10, 2018

    Internet Advocates Blast FCC Copper Retirement Plan

    Communications advocacy group Public Knowledge has told the Federal Communications Commission that rural consumers could be hung out to dry by the agency's decision to expedite the approval process for telecoms wanting to switch from copper to fiber networks.

  • August 10, 2018

    Skadden Steers Amadeus’ $1.5B Deal For TravelClick

    Spanish hotel and travel technology services firm Amadeus IT Group SA on Friday said it will pay $1.52 billion to take over hospitality software company TravelClick Inc. from private equity shop Thoma Bravo LLC, with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP guiding the buyer.

  • August 10, 2018

    Hacker Stole FIFA Video Game Virtual Currency, Feds Say

    A 25-year-old Serbian man allegedly hacked into Electronic Arts Inc.'s computer network and stole the video game company’s licenses and in-game currency for its popular soccer game FIFA 2018, according to court documents filed in California federal court.

  • August 10, 2018

    True Value Gets Credit Card Reader Patent Suit Dismissed

    An Illinois federal judge has dismissed a suit accusing hardware store chain True Value Co. of infringing a patent for a credit card reader, saying the "paradox" and "circular reasoning" in the claim destroys the plaintiff's arguments for patent infringement.

  • August 10, 2018

    Real Estate Rumors: Kavanagh, Splunk, Morgan Stanley

    Kavanagh Advisory Group is reportedly planning to build a four-story Boston Seaport research building, software firm Splunk is reportedly leasing 284,000 square feet in San Jose and Morgan Stanley is said to have loaned $63 million for a recent Chicago-area office complex purchase.

  • August 10, 2018

    McGuireWoods Adds Litigation, Employment Partners

    McGuireWoods has brought husband and wife Yasser and Meghaan Madriz in as partners at the firm's Houston office, bolstering its litigation and labor and employment stable.

  • August 10, 2018

    Taxation With Representation: Kirkland, Cleary, Weil

    In this week’s Taxation With Representation, Amcor and Bemis merged in a $5.24 billion deal, Orix bought a $2.2 billion stake in Avolon Holdings, and KPS Capital Partners sold International Equipment Solutions to Stanley Black & Decker for $690 million.

  • August 10, 2018

    Qualcomm To Pay Taiwan Watchdog $93M To End Patent Row

    Smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm Inc. on Friday announced a $93 million settlement with Taiwan's antitrust watchdog to resolve claims the company refused to sell local manufacturers chips unless they agreed to the terms of its patent licensing, even as its licensing fight with Apple and regulators around the globe continues unabated.

  • August 9, 2018

    Ga. Judge Probing 'Realities' Of Axing Electronic Ballots

    A Georgia federal judge tasked with deciding whether to replace the state's allegedly insecure and unreliable electronic voting system with paper ballots has asked both sides to weigh in during the coming weeks on the "practical realities" of the request, expressing concern with the potential difficulties of implementing the change before the November general elections. 

  • August 9, 2018

    Electric Car Startup Says Rival's No-Poach Terms Are Unlawful

    Electric vehicle startup EVelozcity sued Faraday & Future on Thursday in California state court, calling a contract term its competitor imposes to prevent departing employees from encouraging colleagues to also leave for another company “illegally restrictive.”

  • August 9, 2018

    Brazil Fines Toshiba, Mitsubishi $1.3M For Cartel

    Brazil's competition enforcer said Thursday that it has fined Toshiba Corp. and Mitsubishi Electric Corp. a total of 4.9 million reals ($1.3 million) for their parts in a cartel that fixed prices and divvied up markets for a component used in electrical substations, imposing the penalty after a decadelong investigation.

  • August 9, 2018

    Cognizant Gets Investors’ India Bribery Suit Trimmed

    A New Jersey federal judge on Wednesday trimmed investors’ proposed class action accusing Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp. and three executives of bribing officials in India for special licenses to operate in areas granted certain perks, such as tax exemptions and looser regulations.

  • August 9, 2018

    DOD Makes Tech Industry Outreach Program Permanent

    The U.S. Department of Defense’s technology industry outreach unit is set to be stripped of its “experimental” status, with an incoming name change intended to reflect the program’s importance and permanence within the DOD, according to a memo made public Thursday.

  • August 9, 2018

    Justices Asked To Mull AIA Reviews As Takings

    An audio device maker has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to consider whether patent claims canceled in America Invents Act reviews are regulatory takings by the government, such that patent owners are owed compensation on constitutional grounds, particularly those whose patents were filed or issued before 2011.

  • August 9, 2018

    StubHub Beats App Developer's Trade Secrets Theft Claims

    A California federal judge has awarded StubHub a win over allegations it flouted the Defend Trade Secrets Act when it hired three employees from a startup company who allegedly used proprietary data from their former company in apps they developed for the online ticket vendor.

  • August 9, 2018

    Del. Judge Not Inclined To Reverse $82M IBM Patent Wins

    A federal judge in Delaware said he is inclined to stand pat on most of the jury verdicts and rulings that produced an $82.5 million award in late July against Groupon Inc. for infringing four early, e-commerce-related IBM Corp. patents.

  • August 9, 2018

    OptimisCorp Board To Pay $54K In Sanctions In Chancery Suit

    Directors and executives of health care industry software firm OptimisCorp must immediately pay $54,000 in sanctions previously imposed by a Delaware chancery court judge after she denied the defendants' motion to stay the sanction award on Thursday.

  • August 9, 2018

    'Smart Cities' Can Be Easily Hacked, Researchers Warn

    Hackers could remotely mount "supervillain-level" attacks on so-called smart cities — which use digital systems to coordinate city resources — by exploiting a series of basic security flaws, researchers warned at a cybersecurity conference on Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • 1st Circ.'s Uber Ruling Imposes Burdens On App Design

    Geoffrey Wyatt

    Courts have generally recognized that online contracts can be enforced like any other agreements, but a June decision from the First Circuit invalidates an arbitration clause in an electronic contract simply because the link provided was in the wrong font and color. This decision fundamentally misunderstands the nature of internet commerce, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • 6 Trends Will Shape Future International Commercial Disputes

    Cedric Chao

    The world of international litigation and arbitration tends to move slowly — however, I expect the pace of change to accelerate in the coming decade as six trends take hold, says Cedric Chao, U.S. head of DLA Piper's international arbitration practice.

  • SAP Ruling's Curious Approach To Subject Matter Eligibility

    Jeffrey Mann

    While the Federal Circuit's conclusion in SAP v. InvestPic meshes nicely with years of Section 101 jurisprudence, the decision awkwardly invoked an antiquated rationale, say Jeffrey Mann and J. Colby Van Horn of Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP.

  • The Future Of Authenticating Audio And Video Evidence

    Jonathan Mraunac

    The recent emergence of artificial intelligence-based technology has prompted serious concerns about the future integrity of recordings. Attorneys must think critically about standards for authenticating audio and video evidence as well as legislative and regulatory safeguards to discourage pervasive manipulation and forgery, says Jonathan Mraunac of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • Protecting Client Reputations In An Online World

    Jim Wagstaffe

    There’s no doubt we live in a world in which the internet has the potential to amplify defamatory communications. As a result, lawyers are increasingly playing a counseling and litigation role in protecting clients from the posting of negative information and reviews, says Jim Wagstaffe of The Wagstaffe Group.

  • New Risks For US Cos. Inadvertently Supporting North Korea

    Ellen Murphy

    Following a U.S. State Department advisory this week, companies conducting business abroad — particularly in the technology, medical and life sciences industries — should watch out for several areas of heightened risk that may have a nexus to North Korea, say attorneys with Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

  • The Emperor Of Alice’s Abstract Wonderland

    Andrew Michaels

    Stepping through Alice’s two-part test for determining whether a patent impermissibly claims an abstract idea often feels like falling down a rabbit hole. In his dissent last week in Interval Licensing v. AOL, Federal Circuit Judge S. Jay Plager proposed two solutions. I support one but am skeptical of the other, says Andrew Michaels, a professor at the University of Houston Law Center.

  • Are Blockchain Utility Tokens Securities?

    Douglas Pepe

    Many of the most important and promising blockchain projects involve crypto assets and tokens that are designed for — and have — a real use, separate and apart from their prospects as speculative investments. These cases do not fit neatly into a Howey analysis. They are the square pegs facing a regulatory round hole, says Douglas Pepe of Joseph Hage Aaronson LLC. 

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • Carpenter And The High Court's Shift On 4th Amendment

    Sarah Hall

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Carpenter is a clear departure from other Fourth Amendment precedent involving information possessed by third parties and individuals’ activities that occur in public. It questions the very premises on which those precedents were based in light of modern technologies, say Sarah Hall and Brian Lanciault of Thompson Hine LLP.