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Technology

  • October 15, 2018

    ITC Bans Toshiba Memory Device Imports That Crib US Patent

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has banned Toshiba Corp. from importing certain memory devices that rip off Taiwan-based Macronix International Co. Ltd.’s patented semiconductor technology, reversing an earlier finding by an administrative law judge that the Japanese electronics giant’s imports did not violate tariff laws, according to a Monday notice in the Federal Register.

  • October 15, 2018

    Glilot Closes AI, Cybersecurity-Focused Fund With $110M

    Venture capital fund Glilot Capital Partners said on Monday that it has closed its third fund with $110 million in contributions that will be used to invest in Israel-based early-stage startups focusing on artificial intelligence, big data and cybersecurity.

  • October 12, 2018

    Will The Future Of The Supreme Court Bar Be Female?

    While women have made significant inroads into the elite world of U.S. Supreme Court advocacy, last term the number of women arguing at the court hit a decade low. Was it an off year? Or a sign of progress stalled?

  • October 12, 2018

    Supreme Court Women: A Vet & 1st-Timer Talk Gender Disparity

    In exclusive on-camera interviews with Law360, the most prolific female U.S. Supreme Court advocate of the past decade and a first-timer reflect on the status of women in a field still dominated by men.

  • October 12, 2018

    Web's Sophistication Doesn't Fit Title II Box, FCC Argues

    The Federal Communications Commission is building its case that it rightly overturned Obama-era net neutrality rules and changed the regulatory classification of web services, telling the D.C. Circuit in an opening brief that the internet's sophisticated functions are best described as a Title I information service instead of a Title II utility.

  • October 12, 2018

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen Deutsche Bank sue an Italian wealth management bank, several hotels lodge competition claims against Visa and MasterCard and the 200-year-old company behind British bank notes bring a pensions action against HSF. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • October 12, 2018

    PTAB Partly Axes Music Choice Patent In Row With Rival

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Thursday gave a partial win to Stingray Digital Group Inc. in its bitter patent fight with rival music channel provider Music Choice, finding that part of a Music Choice patent for on-demand entertainment systems is invalid as obvious.

  • October 12, 2018

    Broadcom Says EU OK'd $18.9B CA Inc. Deal

    Broadcom Inc.'s $18.9 billion buy of New York-based software company CA Inc. got the green light under the European Union's antitrust laws, clearing the way for the deal's closure by Nov. 5., Broadcom told the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday.

  • October 12, 2018

    ‘Cheerleading’ Not Fraud, HP Atty Tells Startup Trial Jury

    A Hewlett Packard Malaysia manager was merely "cheerleading" when she described possible future work to a startup that now claims it was duped into providing tens of millions of dollars in free services and software, HP's attorney argued Friday at the close of a California federal trial.

  • October 12, 2018

    Google Data Leak Exposes Breach Disclosure Conundrums

    Google is facing widespread backlash after the revelation of its decision not to notify the public of an incident that exposed 500,000 users' data, highlighting not only the tricky waters companies must navigate in breach disclosure deliberations, but also the importance of ensuring such discussions remain under wraps, attorneys say.

  • October 12, 2018

    Chinese Spy Denies He Tried To Steal GE Aviation IP

    A member of China's intelligence agency pled not guilty Friday to charges he attempted to gather trade secrets from jet engine manufacturer GE Aviation, but an Ohio federal judge said he should remain in prison until trial, citing inconsistent accounts about his employment.

  • October 12, 2018

    Fiat Taking A ‘Free Ride’ With Wireless Tech, Bluetooth Says

    Fiat Chrysler is selling cars it says are Bluetooth-compatible and is using the Bluetooth name in its marketing efforts without the tech company’s permission, according to a suit filed Thursday in Washington federal court.

  • October 12, 2018

    Insurer Can't Duck Yahoo's $4M Email Suit Coverage Row

    A California federal judge found on Friday that Yahoo's insurer largely failed to defend and indemnify the company for $4 million in attorneys' fees from multiple class actions accusing it of scanning customers' emails, but said it was up to a jury to decide whether the insurer's failures to come to Yahoo's aid were coverage errors or evidence of bad faith. 

  • October 12, 2018

    DOJ Says AT&T Can't Fix District Court's Errors

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday continued its bid to revive its challenge of AT&T Inc.'s purchase of Time Warner Inc., telling a D.C. Circuit panel that the company can't fix the economic and logical errors made by the lower court judge.

  • October 12, 2018

    Facebook Says 30M Users' Data Accessed In Recent Breach

    Facebook revealed Friday that hackers accessed a trove of sensitive data from nearly 30 million users, including search history and location information, in an unprecedented breach of its platform that has drawn regulators' attention.

  • October 12, 2018

    Telehealth Pilot Needn't Fund New Infrastructure, FCC Told

    Health care and broadband providers are urging the Federal Communications Commission to focus its $100 million telehealth pilot program on existing connections, as well as investing in internet-enabled applications and services, instead of using the program to build out new connections.

  • October 12, 2018

    What Construction Attys Must Know To Avoid Software Pitfalls

    New software and updates for existing programs roll out so often that it's important for construction lawyers to stay informed about what's running on clients' projects in order to minimize cybersecurity risks and avoid problems, including confusion about access rights and notice requirements.

  • October 12, 2018

    11 Firms To Lead IPOs Raising $1.8B Amid Market Volatility

    Eleven firms are scheduled to guide nine initial public offerings projected to raise more than $1.8 billion during the week of Oct. 15, steering a lineup led by information technology and gambling companies that are going public under renewed market volatility.

  • October 12, 2018

    VC Lawyer Returns To Winston To Lead Tech Practice

    Veteran venture capital attorney Rick Ginsberg has returned to Winston & Strawn LLP to lead the Chicago firm’s technology and emerging companies group, after 11 years at DLA Piper.

  • October 12, 2018

    ADT Hit With Stock-Drop Suit Over SEC Disclosures

    Electronic home security business ADT Inc., its directors and controlling shareholders failed to disclose competition in the market and ongoing litigation in filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, ultimately causing the company's stock price to drop, according to a complaint filed in Florida federal court Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Aatrix, Berkheimer And The Future Of Patent Eligibility

    Robert Maier

    The Federal Circuit in Aatrix and Berkheimer may have limited the role of district courts in determining patent eligibility cases. Though these two cases provide some additional guidance, there appears to still be a wide range of viewpoints within the Federal Circuit as to the correct approach to Section 101, say Robert Maier and Jonathan Cocks of Baker Botts LLP.

  • The Trump Admin. Approach To Data Privacy, And Next Steps

    Alan Raul

    On Tuesday, the Trump administration released an ambitious proposal to modernize consumer privacy policy. But there are questions as to how it plans to achieve these laudable goals, say Alan Raul and Christopher Fonzone of Sidley Austin LLP.

  • Chatting With Ex-USPTO Chief About Patent News, IP Strategy

    Eli Mazour

    During a recent interview with Eli Mazour of Harrity & Harrity LLP, David Kappos discussed his time as director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and as head of intellectual property at IBM, reacted to patent-related developments, and provided wide-ranging advice to those in and outside of the IP field.

  • How Corporate Reputation Risk Is Exacerbating D&O Liability

    Nir Kossovsky

    At a time when the materiality of corporate reputation risk is widely recognized, but institutional safeguards against that risk are not, what are the implications for directors and officers? The current state of play is not comforting, says Nir Kossovsky of Steel City Re.

  • 5 More GC Tips For Succeeding As A New Associate

    Jason Idilbi

    Jason Idilbi, former BigLaw associate and general counsel of the tech startup Passport Labs Inc., returns to Law360 to share recent thoughts on best practices for newer associates — whether they are serving external clients or senior attorneys within their firms.

  • Opinion

    To Help Keep The Tech Bull Running, FCC Must Forbear

    Jonathan Spalter

    When the Telecommunications Act was passed in 1996, texting, social media and other nonvoice forms of communication were still far off on the horizon. That is why the Federal Communications Commission should forbear from enforcing outdated rules in order to modernize innovation policy, says Jonathan Spalter, CEO of USTelecom.

  • Preparing For Battle: IP Considerations During Trade War

    Lori Meddings

    The new U.S.-China tariffs expand the impact of the trade war on U.S. companies and their suppliers overseas. Tariffs can create negative consequences for intellectual property rights holders due to the reaction that suppliers might have if demand drops, or margins are significantly cut, say Lori Meddings and Li Zhu of Quarles & Brady LLP.

  • Many Crypto Exchanges May Now Need Colorado Licenses

    Sarah Auchterlonie

    Ever since cryptocurrencies appeared on the scene, states have scrambled to determine whether their money transmission laws and licensure requirements apply to cryptocurrency exchanges. Last week, Colorado joined the minority of jurisdictions with clear guidance on the issue, say attorneys with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck LLP.

  • Open-Source Software In Connected Vehicles: Pros And Cons

    Marjorie Loeb

    As automobiles become part of the internet of things, some automakers and their suppliers are turning to open-source software to reduce costs, accelerate development and enhance interoperability. But a disciplined and thoughtful approach is needed to evaluate software licensing terms, functionality, stability and security, say attorneys with Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Block Reviews 'Tough Cases'

    Judge Frederic Block

    In a new, extraordinary book, "Tough Cases: Judges Tell the Stories of Some of the Hardest Decisions They’ve Ever Made," 13 of my judicial brethren have courageously and dramatically humanized the judicial process, says U.S. District Judge Frederic Block of the Eastern District of New York.