Technology

  • November 17, 2017

    Groups, Tech Experts Knock Automated Vetting Initiative

    A slew of tech experts and civil rights groups are raising the alarm over the Trump administration's proposed “extreme vetting initiative” for immigrants, sending letters to the Department of Homeland Security on Thursday arguing the program would likely be discriminatory.

  • November 17, 2017

    Inseego Suit Cites Representations Not In Deal, Sellers Say

    Attorneys representing the sellers of Feeney Wireless LLC in a $50 million merger with Inseego Corp. told a Delaware state court judge that fraud claims from the buyer should be tossed because they cite representations made by the seller that were not included in the agreed-upon terms of the transaction.

  • November 17, 2017

    Facebook Sheds User Tracking MDL For Third And Final Time

    A California federal judge on Friday tossed for the third and final time sprawling multidistrict litigation accusing Facebook of unlawfully tracking users' browsing activity after they signed off, ruling that plaintiffs had failed to identify an actual contract that prohibited the social media site's behavior. 

  • November 17, 2017

    Cybersecurity Veteran Joins Crowell & Moring's SF Office

    Crowell & Moring LLP has picked up Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP’s leading cybersecurity and data privacy attorney, who has experience representing major tech companies including Facebook and Microsoft, to serve as a partner in its San Francisco office.

  • November 17, 2017

    Gilstrap Denies Another Post-TC Heartland Transfer Bid

    Eastern District of Texas Judge Rodney Gilstrap has refused to transfer multiple patent infringement suits filed by Nichia Corp. against television and lightbulb makers, finding that the companies consented to litigate the disputes in Texas and they can’t “take back” that admission in the wake of the Supreme Court’s May TC Heartland decision.

  • November 17, 2017

    Open Questions Surrounding The Next-Gen TV Standard

    The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to allow broadcasters to begin using the new internet protocol-based television standard, but the immediate impacts of voluntarily adopting ATSC 3.0 still remain clouded. Here, Law360 gets experts' take on 3 open questions surrounding the advent of ATSC 3.0.

  • November 17, 2017

    House Committee Presses Equifax For More Breach Details

    House Energy and Commerce Committee leaders on Friday dialed up the heat on Equifax over a massive data breach that compromised 145.5 million Americans' personal and financial records, demanding more answers to questions related to the software vulnerability that was exploited, the credit bureau's response to the incident and a potential second compromise in mid-October.

  • November 17, 2017

    VC-Backed Stitch Fix Ekes Gain After $120M IPO Prices Low

    Shares of venture-backed e-commerce startup Stitch Fix Inc. barely gained on Friday after pricing a downsized $120 million initial public offering, making it one of five issuers spanning the technology, real estate, banking and life science sectors to debut on public markets.

  • November 17, 2017

    Facebook Cites Alice In Bid To Escape Search Patent Suit

    Facebook Inc. invoked the U.S. Supreme Court’s Alice decision on Thursday in an attempt to rid itself of an infringement suit over organized search results, telling a California federal court that people have been organizing information as long as they’ve been gathering it.

  • November 17, 2017

    Cozen O’Connor Snags Ex-DLA Piper IP Litigator

    A DLA Piper litigator who has represented information technology company Micro Focus in a copyright lawsuit and a shareholder group in a merger-related intellectual property dispute — and is the grandson of a DLA Piper founder — has joined Cozen O’Connor.

  • November 17, 2017

    Seagate, Hulu IP Attys Say Don't Negotiate With NPEs

    An Uber Inc. intellectual property executive and IP counsel at Seagate and Hulu lambasted patent licensing companies for filing frivolous suits during an event in Silicon Valley on Thursday, with all of them agreeing that they take a "don't negotiate with terrorists" strategy in fighting nonpracticing entities.

  • November 17, 2017

    Google Seeks Final Ruling Protecting Search Results

    Google urged a California federal judge Friday to permanently stop enforcement of an order from Canada’s highest court that would compel the tech titan to scrub worldwide searches of results from a company accused of selling products containing stolen trade secrets.

  • November 17, 2017

    Broadsoft Shareholders Sue To Block $1.9B Cisco Deal

    A proposed class of BroadSoft Inc. shareholders say Cisco Systems Inc.’s $1.9 billion bid for the company gives them a raw deal, accusing the telecommunications software company and its executives in Maryland federal court Thursday of keeping them in the dark ahead of a special vote on the proposed deal.

  • November 16, 2017

    Ignition Interlock Co. Seller Is Withholding Escrow, Buyer Says

    The private equity firm that purchased ignition interlock device maker 1A Smart Start Inc. in 2015 filed suit in Delaware late Wednesday, saying the seller is trying to claim escrowed funds from the deal despite failing to achieve a favorable result in a tax dispute, as required in the escrow agreement.

  • November 16, 2017

    PTAB Chief Debunks Patent Myth As Petitions Soar

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's chief judge said Thursday that he wants to debunk the notion that patent owners are getting "gang tackled” as the PTAB receives more review petitions than ever, arguing that 84 percent of the time a single petitioner challenges the patent.

  • November 16, 2017

    Startup Tells 9th Circ. $1B IP Holder Not A 'Sham' Co.

    Startup Indiezone Inc. told the Ninth Circuit on Thursday that a lower court erred in sanctioning it and its lawyer for bringing a “sham” company into its case alleging former employees conspired to steal its $1 billion e-commerce processing software, saying new evidence showed the co-plaintiff was legitimate.

  • November 16, 2017

    Broadcasters Cleared By FCC To Use Next-Gen TV Standard

    The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to allow broadcasters to begin implementing the next-generation TV standard known as ATSC 3.0, to the chagrin of Democratic commissioners, who said the move will be a boon for industry but a setback for consumers.

  • November 16, 2017

    FCC Clears Path For 5G Technology

    The Federal Communications Commission took action to free up spectrum for 5G on Thursday, the same day the chair of a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee touted the benefits of the fifth-generation wireless broadband technology during a hearing on its development and potential challenges.

  • November 16, 2017

    Avenue Capital $6M MagnaChip Fraud Deal Tossed Again

    A California federal judge on Thursday refused for the second time to grant preliminary approval to a $6.2 million deal between MagnaChip Corp.'s majority shareholder Avenue Capital and the semiconductor products maker's common stock investors who sued for an alleged fraud scheme in which Avenue sold its shares at inflated prices.

  • November 16, 2017

    Chinese Fintech Jianpu Raises $180M After IPO Prices Low

    Online financial planning platform Jianpu Technologies Inc. said Thursday it raised $180 million after pricing 22.5 million shares at $8 each — below its projected range of $8.50 to $10.50 — representing the latest Chinese financial technology firm to complete a U.S. IPO.

Expert Analysis

  • From Snaps To Tweets: The Craft Of Social Media Discovery

    Matthew Hamilton

    Courts have consistently held that social media accounts are subject to established discovery principles but are reluctant to allow parties to rummage through private social media accounts. Recent case law confirms that narrowly tailored information requests get the best results, say Matthew Hamilton, Donna Fisher and Jessica Bae of Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • The Battle Over 3rd-Party Releases Continues

    Matthew Kelsey

    Bankruptcy courts have taken divergent approaches to analyzing whether they have jurisdiction to approve nonconsensual third-party nondebtor releases. While the New York bankruptcy court's recent decision in SunEdison provides another data point for the debate, it leaves some questions unanswered, say attorneys with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • How The Gov't Defends PTAB Partial Institution Rule

    Jason Nolan

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s persuasive brief in SAS Institute v. Matal — set for oral argument on Nov. 27 — suggests this inter partes review case may improve the government’s winning percentage at the U.S. Supreme Court, says Jason Nolan of Duane Morris LLP.

  • An Interview With Former DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson

    Randy Maniloff

    Jeh Johnson, the former secretary of homeland security, was kind enough to let me visit him to reflect on his diverse career. He told stories that left me speechless. And yes, the man who was responsible for the Transportation Security Administration removed his shoes when going through airport security. You bet I asked, says Randy Maniloff of White and Williams LLP.

  • With Integration Pilot Program, Drones Are Ready To Fly

    Patrick Reilly

    The White House recently announced it will cull regulatory restrictions on the use of unmanned aircraft systems, and will allow state and local governments to submit proposals for drone testing. Companies interested in drones should understand how federal rules impact licensing of pilots, registration of drones and more, say Patrick Reilly and Blake Angelino of Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • Hurdles To Consider When Securing A Personnel File

    Michael Errera

    Attorneys should follow seven key points to ensure that their discovery requests and pleadings are appropriately prepared to overcome common hurdles that may be encountered when requesting production of a personnel file, say Michael Errera and Paul Ferland of Foran Glennon Palandech Ponzi & Rudloff PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Gilstrap Reviews 'Alexander Hamilton'

    Judge Rodney Gilstrap

    While Alexander Hamilton is the subject of a hit Broadway musical and renewed biographical examinations, professor Kate Brown takes us down a road less traveled in her book "Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law" — showing Hamilton as first, last and foremost an American lawyer, says U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap of the Eastern District of Texas.

  • The Oracle Audit: Lessons From The Only Licensee Suit

    Arthur Beeman

    Today, 97 percent of Fortune 500 companies license at least some Oracle-branded software. And, as licensees like Mars are discovering, Oracle may subject customers to an expansive auditing process. Early retention of counsel provides a licensee’s best shot at quickly resolving the audit process while avoiding the expensive and restrictive quick fixes that Oracle might propose, say attorneys with Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • The Case For Creating A Mediation Department At Your Firm

    Dennis Klein

    There are at least four reasons supporting the need for some form of a mediation group within a law firm, especially in firms with larger practices, according to Dennis Klein, owner of Critical Matter Mediation and former litigation partner at Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP.

  • Why Trade Secret Litigation Is On The Rise

    Jeffrey Mordaunt

    The insight we gathered from analyzing federal trade secret cases decided since 1990 paints a clear picture of the far-ranging effects that the Defend Trade Secrets Act, patent law and the changing labor landscape will have on trade secret litigation going forward, say Jeffrey Mordaunt and Joshua Swedlow of Stout Risius Ross LLC.