Technology

  • January 15, 2021

    BlackBerry, Facebook Drop Patent Fight Over Messaging Tech

    BlackBerry and Facebook have agreed to end a patent dispute accusing each other of infringing numerous patents relating to messaging technology.

  • January 15, 2021

    Apple-VirnetX Judge Explains Why He Won't Grant New Trial

    A Texas federal judge made public on Friday his reasons for not granting Apple Inc. a redo over its $503 million patent trial loss to VirnetX Inc., saying among other things that VirnetX's closing arguments didn't unduly push the jury to "punish" its tech giant rival.

  • January 15, 2021

    Simpson, Davis Polk Steer Dating App Bumble's IPO Filing

    Bumble, the women-talk-first dating app, hopes to hit it off with investors amid a robust initial public offerings market, filing plans to go public on Friday under guidance from Simpson Thacher and underwriters' counsel Davis Polk.

  • January 15, 2021

    Investors Say Grubhub Stock Claims Not 'Fraud By Hindsight'

    Grubhub investors urged an Illinois federal judge Friday not to toss out their securities fraud suit claiming the company lied about its ability to attract high-quality diners, arguing their complaint lays out a legal theory "far from 'fraud by hindsight.'"

  • January 15, 2021

    Thermo Fisher Shells Out $876M For Viral Vector Maker

    Lab equipment supplier Thermo Fisher said Friday that it coughed up €725 million ($876 million) in cash to purchase Henogen — a company that makes viral vectors to deliver genetic material into cells — from life science technology and services provider Novasep.

  • January 15, 2021

    NY, FTC Lead Charge To Expand Biometric Privacy Shields

    New York lawmakers and the Federal Trade Commission are the latest to step up pressure on companies to be upfront with consumers about the use of their biometric data, signaling that more laws and regulatory scrutiny are expected for the increasingly popular technology, attorneys say. 

  • January 15, 2021

    PTAB Axes Patent Involved In $4.3M Verdict Against Samsung

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has invalidated five claims of a Florida company's image editing patent at the heart of a $4.3 million jury verdict against Samsung, reversing an earlier decision that upheld the claims.

  • January 15, 2021

    FCC Inks $10M Fine For Racist Political Robocaller

    After sending out thousands of racist robocalls in an attempt to sway public opinion against Black and Jewish political candidates, an Idaho white supremacist is being hit with nearly $10 million in fines from the Federal Communications Commission.

  • January 15, 2021

    Trump White House Finalizes 5G Network Security Plan

    The White House announced Friday it has finalized a four-pronged strategy to help the U.S. roll out safe and effective 5G networks, including promoting "core security principles" in new wireless infrastructure and encouraging global allies to do the same.

  • January 15, 2021

    Outgoing DOJ Antitrust Chief's Greatest Hits

    The Justice Department's top antitrust enforcer, Makan Delrahim, has been sticking song references in the titles of his policy speeches throughout his tenure, most recently announcing a decision about music licensing groups in remarks titled "And the Beat Goes On." Here, Law360 takes a look at the songs Delrahim has cited ahead of his expected departure from the agency Tuesday.

  • January 15, 2021

    What To Expect In High Court's Media Ownership Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court will wade into a more than two-decade-old dispute over media ownership rules on Tuesday and at long last attempt to address the Federal Communications Commission's contrasting obligations to promote both competition and diversity among radio and TV station owners and to eliminate unnecessary constraints on who can hold broadcast properties.

  • January 15, 2021

    Pandemic Again Delays Fired King & Spalding Atty's Trial

    King & Spalding LLP and a lawyer who said he was unlawfully fired for raising ethics concerns will have to wait until at least June to square off at trial, after concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic led a New York federal judge to scuttle plans to push forward in April.

  • January 15, 2021

    Amazon & Publishers Secretly Fixed E-Book Prices, Suit Says

    Amazon was hit Thursday with a proposed class action accusing the tech giant of putting a "stranglehold" on the e-book business by scheming with book publishers on price restraints that caused customers to overpay for digital books if they didn't shop on Amazon's website.

  • January 15, 2021

    Space Internet Biz OneWeb Brings Total Funding To $1.4B

    Newly emerged from bankruptcy, space-based internet provider OneWeb said Friday it's now raised $1.4 billion in financing thanks to new investments from SoftBank and Hughes.

  • January 15, 2021

    Davis Polk, Latham Guide Game Maker Playtika's $1.9B IPO

    Mobile gaming company Playtika began trading on the Nasdaq Friday after pricing an upsized $1.9 billion initial public offering that was guided by Latham & Watkins LLP and Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP.

  • January 15, 2021

    Thoma Bravo's Cadwalader-Led SPAC Rakes In $900M Via IPO

    Shares for a special purpose acquisition company backed by private equity firm Thoma Bravo debuted on the stock exchange after the company landed $900 million in an initial public offering steered by Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP and Latham & Watkins LLP that was among the largest of its kind to tap the market Friday.

  • January 15, 2021

    Texas IT Staffing Co. Settles Immigration Bias Claims

    A Dallas area IT staffing agency has agreed to pay a $34,000 civil penalty to settle claims it discriminated against lawful permanent residents by requiring them to provide proof of work authorization as a prerequisite to submitting applications to clients, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • January 15, 2021

    Video Tech Co. Founder Charged In Pump-And-Dump Scheme

    The founder of a Silicon Valley video streaming service and an investment manager have been indicted for allegedly orchestrating a pump-and-dump stock fraud scheme, Illinois federal prosecutors announced Friday.

  • January 15, 2021

    Taxation With Representation: Baker, Wachtell, Shearman

    In this week's Taxation With Representation, New Fortress Energy snaps up two liquefied natural gas firms for $5 billion, health care products company Steris buys Cantel Medical Corp. for $3.6 billion, and cryptocurrency platform Bakkt goes public.

  • January 15, 2021

    FCC Terminates Plans To Auction T-Band

    The Federal Communications Commission formally halted plans to auction off the T-Band, a swath of radio frequencies that first responders use to communicate across different networks.

  • January 15, 2021

    DOJ Won't Scrap Long-Standing Music Licensing Orders

    The U.S. Department of Justice will leave in place a pair of court orders that have governed music licensing groups BMI and ASCAP for nearly 80 years, saying Friday that there isn't enough consensus to change or kill them right now.

  • January 15, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen China's Huawei facing a patent fight, oil trading giant Mercuria sue a petroleum company and a spread-better file a claim against real estate tycoon Robert Tchenguiz. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • January 15, 2021

    NLRB Sets Mail Election In Amazon Warehouse Union Bid

    About 6,000 workers at an Amazon.com warehouse in Alabama will vote by mail on whether to form a union starting next month after a National Labor Relations Board regional official set terms for the closely watched organizing drive Friday.

  • January 14, 2021

    Cyberpunk 2077 Maker Hit With Investor Suit Over Game Flop

    The Polish company behind the highly anticipated video game Cyberpunk 2077 knew the bug-ridden game was "virtually unplayable" on Xbox and PlayStation systems but misled investors as to its technical viability and pressed on with its release, actions that tanked the company's stock value, shareholders said Thursday.

  • January 14, 2021

    Intel Says Fortress Entities Breached Patent License Deal

    Intel Corp. told a Delaware state court Thursday that Fortress Investment Group and its subsidiaries had violated the terms of a patent licensing agreement, claiming that one of the subsidiaries was suing it over patents that are covered by a 2012 agreement with another subsidiary.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Priorities For Employment-Based Immigration Reform

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    Maria Fernanda Gandarez and Avram Morell at Pryor Cashman propose six practical changes the incoming Biden administration should make to improve employment-based immigration for U.S. employers and remove barriers preventing foreign talent from contributing to economic recovery in the U.S.

  • Lessons From Economic Testimony In 2020 Merger Litigation

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    A look back at 2020 antitrust cases shows why economic evidence is likely to remain a key element in merger-enforcement litigation, despite the occasional anomaly, says Julie Elmer at Freshfields.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Shows Novelty's Role In Patent Eligibility

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    The recent Federal Circuit decision Simio v. FlexSim is the latest in a trend concerning a class of inventions that are patent ineligible because they’re not novel despite purporting to improve computer technology, and is informative for winning or surviving early motions to dismiss, say Braden Katterheinrich and JD Schneider at Faegre Drinker.

  • 4 Legal Industry Trends Litigation Financiers Are Watching

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    Some recent litigation developments demonstrate efforts by law firms and their clients to search for opportunities in the COVID-19 economic fallout, while others — such as the rise of contingency fee arrangements — reflect acceleration of tendencies that were already underway, says William Weisman at Therium Capital.

  • A Lawyer's Guide To Setting Well-Being Goals In 2021

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    In the face of rising client demands due to the pandemic and the changing regulatory environment, and with remote work continuing for the foreseeable future, lawyers should invest in their well-being by establishing inspiring yet realistic goals for 2021 — one month at a time, says Krista Larson at Morgan Lewis.

  • 4 Rulings That Will Shape Clickwrap Litigation In 2021

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    Clickwrap litigation is expected to increase this year, following several 2020 judgments that show the courts' growing sophistication on assessing online user agreements and a continued surge in user growth fueled by COVID-19, says Brian Powers of PactSafe.

  • Keyword Searches To Improve Your Privilege Doc Review

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    "Confidential" and other search terms commonly used to locate privileged documents during e-discovery are pretty ineffective, so practitioners should consider including specific types of keywords that are demonstrably better at targeting privilege, say Robert Keeling at Sidley and Rishi Chhatwal at AT&T.

  • State AGs' 2020 Actions Offer Hints At 2021 Priorities

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    A review of state attorney general actions in 2020 addressing consumer concerns including data privacy, product safety and marketplace competition can help companies prepare for the expected regulatory enforcement wave in 2021, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Opinion

    A Law Of The Digital Sea Could Expand Data Rights, Oversight

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    Democracies should implement a law of the digital sea that can balance innovation with individual rights and national security by mandating personal ownership of data, rigorously enforcing antitrust law, and empowering agencies like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to grade cyberhygiene, says Luke Schleusener at QOMPLX.

  • The Benefits Of More Alternative Dispute Resolution At GAO

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    While disruption amid the pandemic undoubtedly contributed to a 210% uptick in the use of alternative dispute resolution at the U.S. Government Accountability Office in fiscal year 2020, bid protest practitioners should hope the upward trend continues given the various efficiencies it brings to the procurement process, says Noah Bleicher at Jenner & Block.

  • ABA Approves Remote Practice, But Questions Remain

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    Lawyers working remotely during the pandemic while physically outside the jurisdictions in which they are licensed will find some comfort in a recent American Bar Association opinion sanctioning such practice, but there is ambiguity regarding the contours of what's allowed, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Keys To Creating Standout Law Firm Thought Leadership

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    Whether geared toward a global audience or a particular client, a law firm's articles, blog posts and client alerts should strive to be original by harnessing a few editorial tools and following the right distribution sequence, say Steven Andersen and Tal Donahue at Infinite Global.

  • Fed. Circ. Patent Decisions In 2020: An Empirical Review

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    Statistical analysis of last year's Federal Circuit patent cases reveals several differences from 2019, including a shift in the docket more toward appeals from district court cases, more affirmances, more nonprecedential opinions and fewer summary dispositions, says Dan Bagatell at Perkins Coie.

  • Perspectives

    Judges On Race: The Power Of Discretion In Criminal Justice

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    Judges should take into consideration the several points of law enforcement and prosecutorial discretion — from traffic stops to charging decisions and sentencing recommendations — that often lead to race-based disparate treatment before a criminal defendant even reaches the courthouse, say Judge Juan Villaseñor and Laurel Quinto at Colorado's Eighth Judicial District Court.

  • 7th Circ. Privacy Ruling Could Expand Article III Standing

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    The Seventh Circuit's recent decision in Fox v. Dakkota Integrated Systems, finding that unlawful retention of biometric data inflicts a particularized and concrete harm on a plaintiff in the same way that unlawful collection does, may lend itself to further expansion of the Article III injury-in-fact requirement for standing in a lawsuit, say attorneys at Orrick.

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