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Technology

  • October 12, 2018

    Venture-Backed Software Co. Anaplan Raises $263.5M In IPO

    Venture-backed cloud software provider Anaplan Inc. debuted on the market Friday after raising $263.5 million in its New York initial public offering, guided by Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve Franklin & Hachigian LLP.

  • October 12, 2018

    Deals Rumor Mill: Sears, SoftBank, Athenahealth

    Sears Holdings Corp. reportedly plans to close as many as 150 of its stores as part of its restructuring plan, Nomura and Goldman Sachs are among the banks SoftBank has tapped related to the public offering for its Japanese wireless business, and upward of five would-be buyers are eyeing Athenahealth.

  • October 12, 2018

    How Attys Can Help PE Clients In The Wake Of A Cyberattack

    They say the best offense is a good defense, but in today’s world it simply isn’t possible for private equity firms to totally protect themselves from a potential cyberattack, meaning PE clients will need attorneys who can quickly and carefully help clean up the mess while limiting any legal exposure in the event of a cyber incident.

  • October 12, 2018

    FTC Knocks Nokia's Stance Against Cellphone Part Licensing

    Qualcomm Inc. must license its patented cellphone components under its obligations with standard-setting groups, contrary to arguments Nokia made backing Qualcomm in an ongoing antitrust suit, the Federal Trade Commission told a California federal judge Thursday.

  • October 12, 2018

    Class Attys Defend 'Boss, Give Money' Notice On WeChat

    Attorneys bringing a proposed class action accusing a New York City car service of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act have argued that they should not be sanctioned for posting a notice of the case on the Chinese social media site WeChat in a post titled “Boss, Give Money.”

  • October 12, 2018

    Microchip Says Taiwanese Co. Stole Microcontroller IP

    Microchip Technology Inc. is accusing a Taiwan-based rival of infringing six patents that cover electronic components that control computer fans, memory and other elements to create nearly identical products in a suit in Delaware federal court.

  • October 12, 2018

    T-Mobile, AT&T Spar Over Vouchers In FCC Spectrum Auction

    Mobile companies this week wrangled over details of an upcoming FCC spectrum auction intended to open up bandwidth for next-generation wireless services, with T-Mobile suggesting in a filing that the commission should consider scrapping a pre-auction voucher exchange, while Verizon and AT&T say the exchange should be kept with minor tweaks.

  • October 12, 2018

    Taxation With Representation: Kirkland, Gibson Dunn

    In this week’s Taxation With Representation, Precision Drilling Corp. nabs Trinidad Drilling Ltd. for $796 million, Antero Midstream GP snagged Antero Midstream Partners’ outstanding common shares for $7.2 billion, TransDigm Group Inc. scoops up Esterline Technologies Corp. for $4 billion, and Imperva Inc. goes private in a $2.1 billion deal with Thoma Bravo LLC.

  • October 12, 2018

    USCIS Overstepping Authority With H-1B Regs, IT Group Says

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is violating various federal regulations by requiring that employers seeking to use H-1B visas list upfront where and when employees will work during the time the worker will use the visa, an information technology trade organization said in District of Columbia federal court on Thursday.

  • October 11, 2018

    HP Treated Startup Like Slaves, Jury Told As Trial Wraps

    A startup alleging Hewlett Packard took tens of millions of dollars in software and services for a Malaysian banking-system project without paying it told jurors during closing arguments Thursday it was roped into “involuntary servitude," while HP's lawyers countered the startup improperly threatened to walk off the job.

  • October 11, 2018

    Lawmakers Chide Google For Not Admitting Data Leak

    Three top Senate Republicans sent a scathing letter to Google on Thursday for not disclosing a security flaw the company says could have exposed personal data from hundreds of thousands of users of its social media site Google+, a day after Senate Democrats called for the Federal Trade Commission to investigate.

  • October 11, 2018

    Ex-Associate Sues Chicago Firm Over Fee-Sharing Deal

    A former associate at a small Chicago-area firm has alleged in an Illinois state court suit that the firm's owner violated their fee-sharing agreement by withholding a share of fees from a whistleblower suit against IBM Corp.

  • October 11, 2018

    Split PTAB Rejects Intel Challenges To Semiconductor Patent

    A split Patent Trial and Appeal Board has declined to review a semiconductor patent challenged by Intel, finding the arguments Intel made were “substantially similar” to the ones considered by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office during prosecution.

  • October 11, 2018

    Vehicle Registration Co. Must Show Docs In Antitrust MDL

    An Illinois federal judge has refused to quash a digital registration company's request for discovery from a vehicle information services firm in antitrust multidistrict litigation, saying the pretrial process shouldn't stop just because the case might eventually get dismissed.

  • October 11, 2018

    Tablet Co. Execs Ink $2.5M Deal Over Pump-And-Dump Claims

    The trustee of bankrupt children’s tablet maker Fuhu Inc. has asked the Delaware bankruptcy court to approve a $2.5 million settlement to end a lawsuit in which the trustee alleged the company’s co-founder and its CEO drove it into Chapter 11 with a pump-and-dump scheme.

  • October 11, 2018

    ITC Lifts Vizio Import Ban After Graphics Patent Settlement

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has agreed to spare TV maker Vizio Inc. from a set of orders barring the company from importing graphics systems found to infringe a U.S. patent in light of a recent licensing agreement between Vizio and the patent owner, according to a Thursday notice in the Federal Register.

  • October 11, 2018

    Rural Groups Urge FCC To Keep Old 3.5 GHz Rules

    Consumer group Public Knowledge was among 20 organizations to sign on to a letter to the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday, urging the agency to preserve existing rules for the 3.5 GHz band that allow small providers to offer broadband service in rural areas.

  • October 11, 2018

    HTC Told To Reveal Google Transaction Records To Ericsson

    HTC must hand over records of a Google transaction in its lawsuit accusing Ericsson of overcharging for aging standard-essential patents, after a judge said the information may aid Ericsson's counterclaims accusing the Taiwanese smartphone maker of offering unfair licensing rates.

  • October 11, 2018

    5G Boost From T-Mobile Merger Said To Benefit Taxpayers

    A national tax reform group has endorsed the proposed merger of Sprint Corp. and T-Mobile US Inc., telling the Federal Communications Commission that combining the telecoms will help them roll out 5G networks and save taxpayers money by reducing subsidies.

  • October 11, 2018

    Clinton-Era NTIA Head Says FCC's 5G Order Is Wrong

    The Federal Communications Commission erred in adopting a recent order that imposes standard rates and terms on 5G “small cells,” and its actions are likely to widen the so-called digital divide, said the National Telecommunications and Information Administration chief under the Clinton administration on Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Hurdles Ahead For California's Female Director Mandate

    Teresa Johnson

    Many believe that California's new law requiring a minimum number of female directors at public companies is necessary. But the law also faces a number of criticisms, and its implementation may well be delayed or even blocked by constitutional challenges, say attorneys with Arnold & Porter.

  • Why It’s Time To Rethink Illinois Brick

    Samuel Miller

    In Apple v. Pepper, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether iPhone owners who purchase apps from Apple’s app store should be considered “direct purchasers” under federal antitrust laws. The court should use this opportunity to reevaluate the direct purchaser analysis it established in Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, says Samuel Miller of UC Hastings Law School.

  • Do Facebook's Targeted Job Ads Violate Title VII?

    Kristen Sinisi

    For the past 50 years, Title VII issues related to classified employment ads arranged by sex remained relatively well-settled. However, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission charges against Facebook’s targeted advertising platform recently resurrected them, says Kristen Sinisi of Bernabei & Kabat PLLC.

  • Can Defrauded Crypto Investors Hope To Recover Anything?

    Brett Theisen

    While insolvencies and fraud in the cryptocurrency space will create many issues of first impression for the courts, some valuable lessons can be found in more traditional fraud cases, such as the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme, says Brett Theisen of Gibbons PC.

  • Opinion

    Skip The New 'Civility Courses' And Think Like A Lawyer

    Alex Dimitrief

    As we watch what passes for political discourse in our nation’s capital, it’s understandable that universities are launching programs on how to cope with ideological disputes. But our country needs fewer people who profess to be open-minded and more people who engage in and honor the conclusions of reasoned debates, says Alex Dimitrief of General Electric Co.

  • UK Product Liability Law In The Autonomous Vehicle Era

    Sarah Batley

    The United Kingdom is positioning itself as the go-to location to develop, test and drive automated vehicles, and has already enacted legislation to provide an insurance model for AVs. But it is not yet clear whether existing U.K. product liability law will be able to accommodate the challenges posed by this new technology, say attorneys with Jones Day.

  • The Broad Impact Of H-1B Premium Processing Suspension

    Yeon Me Kim

    With U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' recent decision to extend and expand the suspension of premium processing for certain H-1B petitions, employers now face uncertain processing times, and workers' ability to safely and promptly change employers is severely limited, say attorneys with Hammond Young Immigration Law​​​​​​​ LLC.

  • Why Law Firms Should Monitor The Dark Web

    Anju Chopra

    Dark web monitoring allows law firms to see what sensitive information may have made its way onto the thriving global underground marketplace where cybercriminals buy and sell exposed data. It can also help lawyers advise clients on a wide range of legal and business matters, say Anju Chopra and Brian Lapidus of Kroll.

  • Does Rule 45 Protect Nonparties From Undue Burden?

    Matthew Hamilton

    Interpretations of Rule 45 protections vary but what's clear is that "undue burden" does not mean no burden at all. To avoid the costs of compliance with a subpoena, a nonparty should be ready to demonstrate its disinterest in the litigation and the anticipated cost and burden of compliance, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Energy Storage: Ready For Takeoff

    Stuart Solsky

    Energy storage has been called the “Swiss army knife” of the electric grid because of the many services it can perform, enhancing both traditional and renewable electric generation. Recent federal and state regulatory developments mean that energy storage is poised to be a major game changer in electric power markets, say attorneys with Baker Botts LLP.