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Technology

  • August 16, 2018

    'Grand Theft Auto' Cheater Barred From Selling Cheats

    A New York federal judge issued an order Thursday stopping an unemployed Georgia man from selling cheat programs used in Grand Theft Auto video games, finding that the company behind the series of games had shown it has a good chance at proving the programs violated the company's copyright.

  • August 16, 2018

    $25M Beats Royalties Winner Likely Getting Interest, Fees

    A California judge on Thursday tentatively ruled that an entrepreneur who won $25.25 million at trial for his work on Beats Electronics LLC’s first headphones is entitled to roughly $5.6 million in prejudgment interest, and said that he will likely award attorneys’ fees in the future.

  • August 16, 2018

    Will Law Schools Start Counting ‘Generation ADA’?

    No one is tracking law students with disabilities to see where the education system may be failing them, but some advocates are working to change this dynamic and build a better pipeline.

  • August 16, 2018

    Ancestry.com Says 23andMe DNA Patent Invalid Under Alice

    Ancestry.com sought to nix allegations it infringed 23andMe Inc.’s technique for determining whether two customers are related by comparing DNA samples, telling a California federal judge Thursday that the patent is invalid under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Alice standard because it’s not inventive and relies on natural phenomenon.

  • August 16, 2018

    Judge Rips Twombly For Straining Resources In IP Row

    A California federal judge appeared unswayed Thursday by SAP America Inc. and HP Inc.’s arguments that a software company hasn't met the stringent pleading standards required under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Twombly decision, saying Twombly has created more work than it’s saved, and "you get to the point where we’re wasting time and resources when you know what their pleading is."

  • August 16, 2018

    Miss. High Court Won't Let Google Slip Student Privacy Suit

    Mississippi's highest court has refused to entertain Google's challenge to a ruling that kept alive a suit lodged by the state's attorney general over the tech giant's allegedly unlawful collection and use of public school students’ personal information, a conclusion that was met with opposition by the court's chief justice. 

  • August 16, 2018

    Electronics Giants Agree To Settle Battery MDL For $43.5M

    Indirect purchasers who allege a slew of battery makers engaged in price-fixing lithium ion batteries told a California federal court on Wednesday that Samsung SDI Co. Ltd., NEC Tokin Corp. and Toshiba Corp. have agreed to settle their multidistrict litigation claims for a total of $43.5 million.

  • August 16, 2018

    Full Fed. Circ. Says Axed Suits Still Start AIA Time-Bar Clock

    The full Federal Circuit ruled Thursday that patent suits that are voluntarily dismissed start the clock on the one-year window the accused party has to file an inter partes review petition, saying the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's contrary holding misread the America Invents Act.

  • August 16, 2018

    Tribes Allowed To Intervene In Small-Cell Rule Challenges

    The D.C. Circuit on Thursday allowed several tribes to intervene in combined challenges to a Federal Communications Commission rule that exempts from environmental and historic reviews small-cell fixtures necessary for building up next-generation or 5G networks.

  • August 16, 2018

    Auto Software Maker Seeks Temporary Ban On Rival's Sales

    A car software company urged a Washington federal court Thursday to temporarily bar a rival from selling competing products that allegedly were made with hacked trade secrets, asserting that an anonymous informant supplied it with images and communications that back up its contentions.

  • August 16, 2018

    Mandamus Not A Tool To Fight IPR Rejections: Fed. Circ.

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday accused Power Integrations Inc. of using mandamus proceedings to try to skirt the law by urging the appeals court to reconsider the merits of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s decision not to review three ON Semiconductor patents.

  • August 16, 2018

    Facebook Sued Over Allegedly Bogus Advertising Stats

    The owner of a Kansas-based aromatherapy fashion business has filed a proposed class action suit in California federal court against Facebook alleging the social media giant grossly inflates so-called potential-reach demographic figures that dictate advertising rates and guide clients in choosing what markets in which to place their ads.

  • August 16, 2018

    Groups Urge FTC To Fine Facebook Amid EU Data Row

    EPIC and a coalition of like-minded internet consumer groups urged the Federal Trade Commission on Thursday to slap Facebook with a hefty fine and conclude the agency's investigation into the Cambridge Analytica scandal by September or potentially see the legal basis for transferring data across the Atlantic grind to a halt.

  • August 16, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Reverses Part Of $7.3M Apple Patent Verdict

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday upended a jury verdict that required Apple Inc. to pay $7.3 million to Core Wireless Licensing SARL, which claimed iPads and iPhones infringed two of its patents covering wireless communications technology.

  • August 16, 2018

    Free Speech Group Backs Trump In 2nd Circ. Twitter Appeal

    Free speech organization the Coolidge-Reagan Foundation on Wednesday stood behind President Donald Trump in his Second Circuit appeal challenging a lower court's decision deeming his blocking of critics from his personal Twitter account unconstitutional, saying the ruling misconstrued the First Amendment.

  • August 16, 2018

    FCC’s Pai Says Debunked Cyberattack Put Him In A Pickle

    Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai on Thursday defended his decision to delay publicly disavowing since-debunked claims that a cyberattack brought down its public comment system last year, telling lawmakers that an agency watchdog’s request to keep mum put him in a difficult position.

  • August 16, 2018

    Battery Makers Seek To Dodge Buyer Claims In Antitrust MDL

    Panasonic Corp. and Sanyo Electric Co. have asked a California federal court to let them out of indirect purchasers' claims in multidistrict litigation over alleged lithium ion battery price-fixing, arguing that the consumers had provided no evidence that they paid unfairly spiked prices for batteries sold by the companies.

  • August 16, 2018

    A Chat With Ogletree Knowledge Chief Patrick DiDomenico

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Patrick DiDomenico, chief knowledge officer at Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • August 16, 2018

    Duane Morris Nabs Epstein Becker Immigration Pro In NY

    Duane Morris LLP has said it hired a former Epstein Becker Green member who’s experienced in representing technology, finance and retail companies in a range of immigration matters.

  • August 16, 2018

    Squire Patton Nabs 3 Leaders Of Dissolved IP Boutique

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP has swallowed intellectual property boutique Singularity LLP, snagging a trio of veteran tech litigators from the dissolved boutique as part of the global firm’s efforts to bolster its intellectual property presence in the Bay Area.

Expert Analysis

  • Sidewalks: The Next Mobility Frontier

    Michele Satterlund

    Sidewalks are an increasingly integral part of how people and goods are transported. While some jurisdictions are banning certain technologies from their sidewalks, others are recognizing the importance of expanding mobility options, says Michele Satterlund, an attorney with McGuireWoods LLP and lobbyist with McGuireWoods Consulting.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: How To Play The Long Game

    Arun Subramanian

    One of us was a clerk when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg read her Ledbetter dissent from the bench, inviting Congress to act, and the other clerked a few years later, when RBG's prominently displayed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act served as a daily reminder that dissents are not just for show, say Arun Subramanian and Mark Musico of Susman Godfrey LLP.

  • Inside The Latest Congressional Hearing On Crypto

    Todd Friedman

    Following a July hearing by the House Committee on Agriculture on the regulation of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology, Todd Friedman of Silver Miller recaps the views of various stakeholders — from the former head of JPMorgan's blockchain program to a former chairman of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: In Pursuit Of Precision

    Trevor Morrison

    As clerks for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we learned early on that, when preparing a memorandum or draft opinion, it was essential to present any opposing argument in its strongest possible light. There is a lesson here for today's public debates, says Trevor Morrison, dean of NYU Law School.

  • ReadyTech And The Future Of The Privacy Shield

    Jason Sarfati

    Despite the Federal Trade Commission’s commitment to continue regulating and enforcing the Privacy Shield program — as evidenced by a settlement last month with ReadyTech — the program itself has recently been placed in jeopardy, says Jason Sarfati of Arent Fox LLP.

  • Crypto Economy Presents Novel Challenges For Insurers

    Thomas Caswell

    In cryptocurrency insurance, volatility disproportionately affects every stage of an insurance policy's life cycle from underwriting to adjustment of losses. This creates real challenges — especially when it comes to valuing losses, say Thomas Caswell and Dennis Anderson of Zelle LLP.

  • The Pros And Cons Of Licensing Technology

    Toni Hickey

    Statistics show that licensing activity is at an all-time high. Still, companies should carefully consider whether and how to license technology, as licensing arrangements can present a conundrum for both intellectual property owners and licensees, say Toni Hickey of Cummins Inc. and William Barrow and Charles Harris of Mayer Brown LLP.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: My RBG Guide To Judging

    Goodwin Liu

    I clerked for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the days of RBG bobbleheads and “You Can’t Spell Truth Without Ruth” T-shirts. I had no idea I would become a judge, and I feel lucky every day that I had the chance to learn from her, says California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

  • 3D Gun Legality After Defense Distributed Settlement, Ruling

    Kelsey Wilbanks

    A month after the U.S. Department of Justice reached a settlement allowing Defense Distributed to legally publish and share its 3D printable gun files on the internet, a Washington federal court granted a preliminary injunction. The reach of permissible file sharing for do-it-yourself plastic guns in the age of 3D printing just took an unexpected turn, says Kelsey Wilbanks of Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC.

  • Responding To Fed. Circ.'s Latest Patent Damages Test

    Eric Phillips

    Although the Federal Circuit's decision last month in Power Integrations v. Fairchild appears to raise the bar on using an entire product as the royalty base, other recent decisions appear to relax requirements for certain plaintiffs or even provide an alternate path to the same damages figure, say Eric Phillips of VLF Consulting Inc. and Amol Parikh of McDermott Will & Emery LLP.