We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close

Technology

  • August 14, 2018

    Investors Sue MoviePass Owners As Stock Bottoms Out

    Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc. investors filed a putative class action suit against the company alleging that it misled the public on the profitability of moviegoing subscription service MoviePass Inc. before the stock bottomed out, according to a filing in New York federal court Monday.

  • August 14, 2018

    Nelson Mullins Adds Corporate Partner in Atlanta Office

    Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP has brought on a corporate attorney who previously worked in private practice as a partner in the firm’s Atlanta office.

  • August 14, 2018

    Microsoft Avoids $47M Danish Transfer Pricing Bill

    Microsoft’s Danish arm does not have to pay a tax bill of more than 308 million krone ($47 million) after Denmark’s authorities failed to prove the tech giant had undercharged for marketing services, Danish court documents said.

  • August 14, 2018

    1 NASA Small-Biz Contract, 1 Giant Leap For Plantkind

    Nanotechnology development company UbiQD Inc. said that it has nabbed a NASA contract that will help fund its work on a nanoparticle film intended to bolster crop growth and production during in-space missions and planetary explorations.

  • August 13, 2018

    Investors Secure Class Cert. In Biotech Stock-Drop Case

    A California federal judge on Monday certified a shareholder class alleging that biotech company NantKwest didn’t tell investors the company had incurred over $114 million in executive compensation expenses for its chief executive officer prior to its $225 million initial public offering in 2015.

  • August 13, 2018

    LED Co. Wins $66M In Trade Secrets Row With Chinese Rival

    A California jury awarded LED lighting company Lumileds LLC $66 million on Friday, finding that the chairman of China’s Elec-Tech International Co. Ltd. had paid a former Lumileds employee to steal trade secrets so that he could implement them in his company’s products.

  • August 13, 2018

    David Boies On How Dyslexia Shaped His Practice

    One of the country’s highest-profile litigators, the Boies Schiller Flexner LLP chairman was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in his 30s. In an interview with Law360, he talks about practicing law with the learning disability.

  • August 13, 2018

    BigLaw’s Mental Health Stigma Shows Signs Of Fading

    Sometimes viewed as an “invisible” disability, mental illness has long been forced under wraps because of the risk attorneys could face bias and stigma. Here’s how lawyers, law firms and other groups are starting to take on the status quo.

  • August 13, 2018

    Apple Seeks To Stop Class Action Bid Over Cracked Watches

    Apple urged a California federal judge Friday to toss a proposed class action accusing the company of selling millions of watches with defective screens that can crack or shatter, saying the watch that prompted the suit broke after the warranty expired.

  • August 13, 2018

    Pai Pens Letter Defending Net Neutrality Rollback

    Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai defended a decision to cut back regulations on internet providers in a policy change that ended so-called net neutrality, saying in a letter made public Friday that the move has freed up competition among broadband providers.

  • August 13, 2018

    Qualcomm's $1.8M Fee Award Upheld In Shipping IP Row

    Freight shipping company R+L Carriers Inc. must fork over $1.8 million to pay Qualcomm Inc.’s attorneys’ fees in a dispute over a shipping logistics patent, the Federal Circuit found Monday, affirming a lower court's ruling that the carrier’s infringement claims against the telecom giant were flawed.

  • August 13, 2018

    FedEx Knocks Out Part Of Intellectual Ventures Tracking IP

    The U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board has invalidated portions of a patent held by Intellectual Ventures that covers shipping and tracking technology, agreeing with FedEx that prior art makes several of the patent claims obvious.

  • August 13, 2018

    SEC Gets Judgment Against Convicted Fitbit Stock Fraudster

    A New York federal judge on Friday signed off on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s consent judgment with Robert W. Murray, a Virginia man serving a two-year sentence for orchestrating a $100 million market manipulation scheme that quickly drove up the price of Fitbit Inc. stock, enjoining him from future securities violations.

  • August 13, 2018

    Facebook Wants Calif. Cambridge Analytica Suit Tossed

    Facebook Inc. on Friday urged a California federal court to dismiss five derivative suits filed by shareholders against the social network's board of directors after the Cambridge Analytica data privacy scandal, saying the investors have not shown that company brass were aware of the research firm's data siphoning.

  • August 13, 2018

    Thales Extends $5B Data Encryption Offer Amid Probes

    The Thales Group said that it has extended the acceptance period for its planned $5 billion purchase of Gemalto NV, as competition authorities in several jurisdictions give the tie-up a close look over concerns about hardware components used for data encryption.

  • August 13, 2018

    Philippines' Watchdog Wins Grab Commitments For Uber Deal

    The competition enforcer for the Philippines said Friday that it has reached an agreement with Grab Inc. that will preserve competition for ride-hailing services in the country after Grab took over Uber Technologies Inc.’s Southeast Asia operations earlier this year.

  • August 13, 2018

    PTAB Says It Can't 'De-Institute' Review Post-SAS

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has denied Finjan Inc.’s bid to “de-institute” inter partes review on its computer security systems patent, after the board chose to review all challenged arguments following the U.S. Supreme Court's recent SAS Institute decision.

  • August 13, 2018

    PTAB Review Trumps State Immunity, DOJ Tells Fed. Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Justice has urged the Federal Circuit to find that state sovereign immunity does not extend to reviews at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, saying the court all but decided the issue in a recent case involving a Native American tribe.

  • August 13, 2018

    Judge Rips Tata's 'Hail Mary' Bid In Discrimination Suit

    A California federal judge on Friday rebuffed Tata Consultancy Services Ltd.’s attempt to chop away at a class action accusing the information technology company of discriminating against non-South Asian employees, calling it "a Hail Mary effort at limiting the scope of relief" months before trial.

  • August 13, 2018

    Electronics Co. Says $1.4M Supply Row Belongs In Court

    A Hong Kong manufacturer of wireless audio system, mobile app and "internet of things" solutions has urged a California federal court not to force it to arbitrate its $1.4 million dispute stemming from a supply agreement with a Nevada-based electronics supplier, saying the parties' agreements call for settling disputes in district court. 

Expert Analysis

  • New Risks For US Cos. Inadvertently Supporting North Korea

    Ellen Murphy

    Following a U.S. State Department advisory this week, companies conducting business abroad — particularly in the technology, medical and life sciences industries — should watch out for several areas of heightened risk that may have a nexus to North Korea, say attorneys with Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

  • The Emperor Of Alice’s Abstract Wonderland

    Andrew Michaels

    Stepping through Alice’s two-part test for determining whether a patent impermissibly claims an abstract idea often feels like falling down a rabbit hole. In his dissent last week in Interval Licensing v. AOL, Federal Circuit Judge S. Jay Plager proposed two solutions. I support one but am skeptical of the other, says Andrew Michaels, a professor at the University of Houston Law Center.

  • Are Blockchain Utility Tokens Securities?

    Douglas Pepe

    Many of the most important and promising blockchain projects involve crypto assets and tokens that are designed for — and have — a real use, separate and apart from their prospects as speculative investments. These cases do not fit neatly into a Howey analysis. They are the square pegs facing a regulatory round hole, says Douglas Pepe of Joseph Hage Aaronson LLC. 

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • Carpenter And The High Court's Shift On 4th Amendment

    Sarah Hall

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Carpenter is a clear departure from other Fourth Amendment precedent involving information possessed by third parties and individuals’ activities that occur in public. It questions the very premises on which those precedents were based in light of modern technologies, say Sarah Hall and Brian Lanciault of Thompson Hine LLP.

  • Biometrics And Geolocation Legislation: A Midyear Update

    Justin Kay

    In the first half of 2018, technology that determines where you are and who you are garnered significant attention. Less discussed are the legislative efforts underway in the federal government and in many states to regulate these emerging technologies, says Justin Kay of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

  • The Role Of IP In The Crypto Bubble

    Aaron Parker

    Crypto markets experienced a sharp downturn in the first half of 2018. But strategically positioned blockchain-related patent and trademark rights can help keep a company financially and technologically relevant through even turbulent times, say attorneys with Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett & Dunner LLP.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • How Courts Are Analyzing Copyright Protection For Software

    Mark Moore

    Two recent copyright decisions reflect a challenge for companies seeking to protect their software — courts' highly nuanced examinations of the functionality and structure of the software at issue in determining whether copyright protection is warranted, says ​​​​​​​Mark Moore of Reavis Page Jump LLP.

  • Opinion

    Buying Military Innovation: P3s Are Not The Best Approach

    Daniel Schoeni

    Experts debate the best strategy for the U.S. Department of Defense's technological leap forward. Options include public-private partnerships and open systems architecture. Innovation is best served by the latter, says Daniel Schoeni, a judge advocate with the U.S. Air Force.