Technology

  • December 4, 2017

    Twitter, Facebook, Google Slip Suit Over Texas Shooting

    A California federal judge on Monday dismissed a Dallas police sergeant’s suit against Twitter, Facebook and Google alleging their websites helped radicalize a terrorist who killed five officers, ruling the sergeant didn’t show how terrorist groups used the sites to influence the shooting.

  • December 4, 2017

    Motorola Accused Of Stifling Rival In Two-Way Radio Market

    Hytera Communications Corp. leveled a lawsuit against Motorola Solutions in New Jersey federal court on Monday alleging the telecommunications giant has unlawfully monopolized the land mobile radios market by using “carrot and stick” tactics to pressure dealers not to carry competitors’ products and “sham litigation” to ruin Hytera’s reputation.

  • December 4, 2017

    Aussie Watchdog To Eye Facebook, Google In Sector Review

    Australia's antitrust enforcer will open an investigation into whether Facebook, Google and other digital platform providers are using their market power to harm competition for media and advertising, the government said Monday.

  • December 4, 2017

    Zurich Wants Quick Win On Tech Data's SEC Investigation

    Zurich American on Friday asked an Illinois federal court to toss a suit from a tech distributor for failing to reimburse the company for millions of dollars spent responding to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation, saying investigations aren’t covered by the policy.

  • December 4, 2017

    Waymo Jury Could Hear Uber ‘Hid The Ball’ In Discovery

    A California federal judge wants to know whether Uber should have given Waymo an ex-employee’s letter alleging a corporate culture of secrecy, saying at a hearing Monday he’d have to tell the jury in the hotly anticipated trial over self-driving car trade secrets if there were attempts to “hide the ball” during discovery.

  • December 4, 2017

    Garmin's Atty Fees Bid Denied In Dropped Patent Suit

    Garmin International Inc. can’t collect attorneys’ fees after the owner of two patents on a product customization system dropped an infringement suit, according to a Texas federal court ruling on Friday that found the litigious patent owner hadn’t obviously filed the suit for extortion purposes.

  • December 4, 2017

    Microsoft Seeks Transfer Of Tribe, Texas Co. Patent Spat

    Microsoft Corp. told a Virginia federal court Friday that patent infringement litigation brought by the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe and Texas-based computer company SRC Labs LLC should be sent to Washington state, where the alleged wrongdoing took place, arguing the suit isn’t sufficiently connected to Virginia.

  • December 4, 2017

    Ireland, Apple Agree To Put $15B In Escrow For Tax Dispute

    The Ireland Department of Finance announced it has reached an agreement with Apple Inc. to put nearly $15 billion in escrow while its dispute with the European Commission over alleged unpaid taxes proceeds through the courts.

  • December 4, 2017

    Patent Holder Faces Uphill Google Fight At Fed Circ.

    A patent licensing company appeared to struggle Monday to convince a Federal Circuit panel to uphold its media search patents in Google’s challenge to a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision against the technology giant.

  • December 4, 2017

    Sony Says HannStar Flipped In Its Bid To Duck Antitrust Deal

    Sony told a California federal court on Friday that HannStar is still trying to escape a $4.1 million settlement over a scheme to fix prices for liquid crystal displays and has now flipped its position after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up its appeal in October.

  • December 4, 2017

    ESPN Ruling Further Narrows Video Privacy Law's Reach

    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling that ESPN didn't violate the Video Privacy Protection Act by disclosing app users’ data to an analytics company deals yet another blow to plaintiffs’ efforts to expand liability under the statute to cover streaming services and other new technologies, attorneys say.

  • December 1, 2017

    Sprint Accuses Charter Of Infringing Internet Call IP

    Sprint sued Charter in Delaware federal court Friday for allegedly infringing patents on technology that lets users make phone calls over the internet, the latest in a series of suits that have produced a verdict and settlements worth hundreds of millions of dollars for Sprint.

  • December 1, 2017

    VC Group Gets Win In Foreign Entrepreneur Rule Row

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday granted a venture capital group's bid to vacate a Trump administration rule that delayed an Obama-era regulation for international entrepreneurs, finding it unlawful because the government failed to give time for public notice or comment.

  • December 1, 2017

    CIBER Creditors Warn Of Uneven Recoveries In Del. Ch. 11

    Unsecured creditors of bankrupt information technology company CIBER Inc. objected Friday to the confirmation of the company’s Chapter 11 plan in Delaware federal court, alleging inadequate disclosures of plan details and impermissible, disparate treatment of creditors.

  • December 1, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Gives Microsoft, IBM New Shot To Ax Web Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Friday gave Microsoft and IBM a renewed opportunity to seek to invalidate two Parallel Networks webpage-management patents, finding that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board wrongly concluded the tech giants failed to show the patents are invalid.

  • December 1, 2017

    PTAB Won't Review Blackbird Data Storage Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board said Friday it would not review a patent that Blackbird Technologies has accused Netflix Inc. and Starz Entertainment LLC of infringing, finding a defensive patent group hadn’t shown various claims were likely invalid.

  • December 1, 2017

    Chancery Tosses Shareholder Suit Over Oracle Merger

    The Delaware Chancery Court on Thursday dismissed a suit disputing a 2016 merger between Oracle Corp. and a cloud service provider, saying the objecting shareholder failed to show a single shareholder or shareholder group forced through an unfair deal.

  • December 1, 2017

    Google Nears Win In Gender Pay Row, But Fight To Continue

    A California state judge on Friday said that she will probably toss a California Equal Pay Act putative class action alleging that Google Inc. pays women less than men who do the same work, but said she will let the three plaintiffs amend their complaint to add specifics to their allegations.

  • December 1, 2017

    DOD Avoids Lowest-Cost Process For IT Contracts, GAO Says

    The U.S. Defense Department has made sparse use of a procurement structure that prioritizes low cost above all other factors when awarding high-dollar contracts for information technology services, the Government Accountability Office said Thursday.

  • December 1, 2017

    Apple, Samsung And Others Prevail In LTE Patent Row

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Thursday invalidated numerous claims in a patent related to LTE wireless technology that the owner, Evolved Wireless LLC, has accused Apple, Samsung and other smartphone makers of infringing.

Expert Analysis

  • Being There: Defending Depositions

    Alan Hoffman

    Defending depositions is challenging. The lawyer is the only shield and protector for the witness and the client. The rules of engagement are less than clear, and fraught with ethical perils. Difficult judgment calls often must be made in the heat of battle. This is where lawyers really earn their keep, says Alan Hoffman of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • The Aftermath Of Impression Products V. Lexmark

    Brian Kacedon

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's May decision in Impression Products v. Lexmark, the patent exhaustion landscape is likely to be shaped by two issues: When is a transaction properly viewed as a license rather than a sale, and are licenses attached to the product on sale enforceable? Answers might be gleaned from existing case law, say Brian Kacedon and Kevin Rodkey of Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett & Dunner LLP.

  • 3 Recent Bid Protest Decisions You Should Know About

    Thomas McLish

    Three October bid protest decisions from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and the Government Accountability Office — in Sonoran, IPKeys and CliniComp — may affect how government contractors approach the proposal and protest process, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Legal Fallout For Harvey Weinstein’s Hired Hands

    Nicole Kardell

    There is a difference between a lawyer or investigator seeking evidence to defend against allegations and correct misrepresentations, and, on the other hand, using duplicitous means to gather information and intimidate alleged victims and journalists. Client advocacy does not mean winning at all costs, says Nicole Kardell of Ifrah Law PLLC.

  • Visa Alternatives To Consider When H-1B Isn't An Option

    Andrew Greenfield

    Recently, a strong economy, coupled with a low unemployment rate for college-educated professionals has resulted in U.S. employers having just over a 30 percent chance of having their H-1B petitions selected for adjudication. Fortunately, there are alternatives employers can consider when they are unable to obtain the foreign professional resources they need, says Andrew Greenfield of Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy LLP.

  • Jury Persuasion In An 'Alt-Fact' World

    Shelley Spiecker

    Today's climate of “alternative facts” has jurors making decisions based on beliefs, emotions and social affiliations that often go unacknowledged or underappreciated. To present their case in the most persuasive manner possible, litigators should consider adapting to their audience when it comes to four psychological factors, say consultants with Persuasion Strategies, a service of Holland & Hart LLP.

  • Are 'Smart' Courts Smart Enough For IP Disputes?

    Junqi Hang

    Remote video appearance is already in use for certain trials, hearings, and arbitration and mediation proceedings. But the methodology of court remoteness and the concept of "smart" courts may not be able to accommodate intellectual property cases, which tend to be complex in subject matter, say Junqi Hang and Jingqiang Zhang of Dragon Intellectual Property Law Firm.

  • Applying The Investors' Playbook To Legal Career Planning

    Howard Cohl

    Nothing has been more instrumental in my role as a legal recruiter than what I learned from a variety of hedge fund managers, venture capitalists and investment bankers — how to analyze a deal and make a decision quickly. It boils down to the traditional SWOT analysis, says Howard Cohl, director in Major Lindsey & Africa’s emerging markets group.

  • How IT And Procurement Pros Can Inform Law Firm Budgeting

    Steve Falkin

    As law firms begin preparing for their annual budget review, Steve Falkin and Lee Garbowitz of HBR Consulting discuss why firm leaders should give their internal information technology and procurement teams a seat at the table.

  • Misclassification Claims Threaten Gig Economy Business

    Tracey Diamond

    Recent gig economy cases in New York and California are either pending or were settled before the court could issue a determinative judgment as to the proper classification of workers. But the facts of the cases and the settlement details provide valuable insight into the potential risks and exposure for gig economy companies, say attorneys with Pepper Hamilton LLP.