Technology

  • December 4, 2017

    Motorola Accused Of Stifling Rival In Two-Way Radio Market

    Hytera Communications Corp. leveled a lawsuit against Motorola Solutions in New Jersey federal court on Monday alleging the telecommunications giant has unlawfully monopolized the land mobile radios market by using “carrot and stick” tactics to pressure dealers not to carry competitors’ products and “sham litigation” to ruin Hytera’s reputation.

  • December 4, 2017

    Aussie Watchdog To Eye Facebook, Google In Sector Review

    Australia's antitrust enforcer will open an investigation into whether Facebook, Google and other digital platform providers are using their market power to harm competition for media and advertising, the government said Monday.

  • December 4, 2017

    Zurich Wants Quick Win On Tech Data's SEC Investigation

    Zurich American on Friday asked an Illinois federal court to toss a suit from a tech distributor for failing to reimburse the company for millions of dollars spent responding to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation, saying investigations aren’t covered by the policy.

  • December 4, 2017

    Waymo Jury Could Hear Uber ‘Hid The Ball’ In Discovery

    A California federal judge wants to know whether Uber should have given Waymo an ex-employee’s letter alleging a corporate culture of secrecy, saying at a hearing Monday he’d have to tell the jury in the hotly anticipated trial over self-driving car trade secrets if there were attempts to “hide the ball” during discovery.

  • December 4, 2017

    Garmin's Atty Fees Bid Denied In Dropped Patent Suit

    Garmin International Inc. can’t collect attorneys’ fees after the owner of two patents on a product customization system dropped an infringement suit, according to a Texas federal court ruling on Friday that found the litigious patent owner hadn’t obviously filed the suit for extortion purposes.

  • December 4, 2017

    Microsoft Seeks Transfer Of Tribe, Texas Co. Patent Spat

    Microsoft Corp. told a Virginia federal court Friday that patent infringement litigation brought by the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe and Texas-based computer company SRC Labs LLC should be sent to Washington state, where the alleged wrongdoing took place, arguing the suit isn’t sufficiently connected to Virginia.

  • December 4, 2017

    Ireland, Apple Agree To Put $15B In Escrow For Tax Dispute

    The Ireland Department of Finance announced it has reached an agreement with Apple Inc. to put nearly $15 billion in escrow while its dispute with the European Commission over alleged unpaid taxes proceeds through the courts.

  • December 4, 2017

    Patent Holder Faces Uphill Google Fight At Fed Circ.

    A patent licensing company appeared to struggle Monday to convince a Federal Circuit panel to uphold its media search patents in Google’s challenge to a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision against the technology giant.

  • December 4, 2017

    Sony Says HannStar Flipped In Its Bid To Duck Antitrust Deal

    Sony told a California federal court on Friday that HannStar is still trying to escape a $4.1 million settlement over a scheme to fix prices for liquid crystal displays and has now flipped its position after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up its appeal in October.

  • December 4, 2017

    ESPN Ruling Further Narrows Video Privacy Law's Reach

    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling that ESPN didn't violate the Video Privacy Protection Act by disclosing app users’ data to an analytics company deals yet another blow to plaintiffs’ efforts to expand liability under the statute to cover streaming services and other new technologies, attorneys say.

  • December 1, 2017

    Sprint Accuses Charter Of Infringing Internet Call IP

    Sprint sued Charter in Delaware federal court Friday for allegedly infringing patents on technology that lets users make phone calls over the internet, the latest in a series of suits that have produced a verdict and settlements worth hundreds of millions of dollars for Sprint.

  • December 1, 2017

    VC Group Gets Win In Foreign Entrepreneur Rule Row

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday granted a venture capital group's bid to vacate a Trump administration rule that delayed an Obama-era regulation for international entrepreneurs, finding it unlawful because the government failed to give time for public notice or comment.

  • December 1, 2017

    CIBER Creditors Warn Of Uneven Recoveries In Del. Ch. 11

    Unsecured creditors of bankrupt information technology company CIBER Inc. objected Friday to the confirmation of the company’s Chapter 11 plan in Delaware federal court, alleging inadequate disclosures of plan details and impermissible, disparate treatment of creditors.

  • December 1, 2017

    Fed. Circ. Gives Microsoft, IBM New Shot To Ax Web Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Friday gave Microsoft and IBM a renewed opportunity to seek to invalidate two Parallel Networks webpage-management patents, finding that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board wrongly concluded the tech giants failed to show the patents are invalid.

  • December 1, 2017

    PTAB Won't Review Blackbird Data Storage Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board said Friday it would not review a patent that Blackbird Technologies has accused Netflix Inc. and Starz Entertainment LLC of infringing, finding a defensive patent group hadn’t shown various claims were likely invalid.

  • December 1, 2017

    Chancery Tosses Shareholder Suit Over Oracle Merger

    The Delaware Chancery Court on Thursday dismissed a suit disputing a 2016 merger between Oracle Corp. and a cloud service provider, saying the objecting shareholder failed to show a single shareholder or shareholder group forced through an unfair deal.

  • December 1, 2017

    Google Nears Win In Gender Pay Row, But Fight To Continue

    A California state judge on Friday said that she will probably toss a California Equal Pay Act putative class action alleging that Google Inc. pays women less than men who do the same work, but said she will let the three plaintiffs amend their complaint to add specifics to their allegations.

  • December 1, 2017

    DOD Avoids Lowest-Cost Process For IT Contracts, GAO Says

    The U.S. Defense Department has made sparse use of a procurement structure that prioritizes low cost above all other factors when awarding high-dollar contracts for information technology services, the Government Accountability Office said Thursday.

  • December 1, 2017

    Apple, Samsung And Others Prevail In LTE Patent Row

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Thursday invalidated numerous claims in a patent related to LTE wireless technology that the owner, Evolved Wireless LLC, has accused Apple, Samsung and other smartphone makers of infringing.

  • December 1, 2017

    LG Can't Shake Most Claims Over Shoddy Washers

    LG Electronics USA Inc. mostly lost its bid to escape a putative class action over allegedly defective washing machines on Thursday when a New Jersey federal judge said consumers could pursue claims that the company was aware of the defects and failed to disclose them.

Expert Analysis

  • How IT And Procurement Pros Can Inform Law Firm Budgeting

    Steve Falkin

    As law firms begin preparing for their annual budget review, Steve Falkin and Lee Garbowitz of HBR Consulting discuss why firm leaders should give their internal information technology and procurement teams a seat at the table.

  • Misclassification Claims Threaten Gig Economy Business

    Tracey Diamond

    Recent gig economy cases in New York and California are either pending or were settled before the court could issue a determinative judgment as to the proper classification of workers. But the facts of the cases and the settlement details provide valuable insight into the potential risks and exposure for gig economy companies, say attorneys with Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Getting Real About Artificial Intelligence At Law Firms

    Mark Williamson

    Artificial intelligence needs to be legally defensible in order to be useful to law firms. There are requirements for making this happen, says Mark Williamson, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hanzo Archives Ltd.

  • Proportionality, Not Perfection, Is What Matters

    John Rosenthal

    A few jurists and commentators have recently caused a stir in the e-discovery community by arguing that litigants should avoid using keyword searches to filter or cull a document population before using predictive coding. This “no-cull” rationale undermines the principle of proportionality at the heart of the recent changes to Federal Rule 26, say John Rosenthal and Jason Moore of Winston & Strawn LLP.

  • High Court Gets Ready To Weigh Privacy Vs. Public Safety

    Bob Anderson

    On Nov. 29, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in Carpenter v. United States — a case that could dramatically affect the future of surveillance, potentially requiring law enforcement to secure a warrant each time it seeks cell tower data and similar types of metadata, says Bob Anderson, leader of Navigant Consulting Inc.'s information security practice.

  • Dealing With H-1B Extensions In The New No-Deference Era

    Rabindra Singh

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director L. Francis Cissna recently implemented a new policy memo that specifically instructs all USCIS officers not to give deference to any previously approved nonimmigrant visa petition. In light of the policy shift, Rabindra Singh of Immigration Attorneys LLP shares a few practice pointers to consider before filing an H-1B extension petition.

  • Make Way For The 'Unicorns'

    Lucy Endel Bassli

    By "unicorn" I don’t mean the next great tech startup with a valuation of $1 billion. I mean the new breed of lawyers realizing that there are better ways to get their day jobs done, says Lucy Endel Bassli, assistant general counsel leading the legal operations and contracting functions at Microsoft Corp.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McConnell Reviews 'Unequal'

    Judge John McConnell

    As widespread claims of sexual misconduct continue to surface in the entertainment industry and beyond, a discussion of how judges treat workplace discrimination cases may be particularly timely. Here, U.S. District Judge John McConnell reviews the book "Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law," by professors Sandra Sperino and Suja Thomas.

  • Roundup

    Making Pro Bono Work

    Pro Bono Thumbnail

    In this series, attorneys explore the challenges and rewards of pro bono volunteering in the legal profession.

  • Being There: Preparing Witnesses For Depositions

    Alan Hoffman

    Preparing witnesses to be deposed is a critical element of discovery. It is important to remember that each witness is an individual with unique personal qualities, strengths and weaknesses. Getting to know the witness helps establish rapport and trust, says Alan Hoffman of Husch Blackwell LLP.