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Telecommunications

  • September 19, 2018

    Qualcomm Can't Fast-Track Bid To Ax Apple's Patent Claims

    Qualcomm has failed to convince a California federal judge to hasten proceedings on its effort to dust aside certain patent-related claims by Apple in the pair’s ongoing legal brawl, with the judge agreeing on Wednesday with Apple’s argument that “extreme expedited treatment” was not warranted.

  • September 19, 2018

    NTIA's Redl Says Spectrum Sharing Is The Future Of 5G

    For National Telecommunications and Information Administration head David Redl, the government’s vast land and spectrum holdings are an untapped resource that can help make 5G a reality.

  • September 19, 2018

    EEOC Hits Cable Co. With Suit Over Absence, Leave Policies

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleged in a federal lawsuit Wednesday that a Hawaiian communications company that’s now part of Spectrum regularly denied disabled employees a reasonable accommodation of leave, flouting the Americans with Disabilities Act.

  • September 19, 2018

    FCC Clears Nominet To Run TV 'White Space' Database

    The FCC has found database operator Nominet fit to operate technology used to monitor spectrum bands held by broadcasters in order to direct unlicensed users toward unused gaps on the airwaves.

  • September 19, 2018

    FCC Must Rein In Local Cable Franchise Fees, Groups Say

    The Federal Communications Commission should clarify that internet services provided by cable companies are generally not subject to fees imposed by local franchising authorities, according to public comments posted Tuesday and Wednesday.

  • September 19, 2018

    Calif. IPhone Users Win Cert. In 'Broken' FaceTime Suit

    A California federal judge Tuesday certified a class of California consumers claiming that Apple Inc. “broke” its FaceTime service on iPhones using older operating systems, but declined to certify a nationwide class because the laws in question differ from state to state.

  • September 19, 2018

    Pai Says FCC Still Probing Sinclair's Honesty In Tribune Deal

    Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has told lawmakers that the agency's in-house judge is still reviewing allegations that Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. was not honest in its attempt to acquire the Tribune Media Co., according to a letter released Wednesday.

  • September 18, 2018

    Dutch Telecom Says Tech Co.'s $37M Suit Must Be Arbitrated

    Dutch telecom Veon Ltd. and its erstwhile Italian subsidiary have urged a California federal court to send to arbitration an approximately $37 million dispute with an information technology company over alleged fraud, saying the technology company is obligated to honor its contractual promise to arbitrate disputes.

  • September 18, 2018

    Dems Want Calif. Net Neutrality Bill Signed Despite Pai

    Democrats are urging California Gov. Jerry Brown to sign what is considered the nation's toughest net neutrality law after FCC Chairman Ajit Pai dragged the legislation as “a radical, anti-consumer” measure.

  • September 18, 2018

    Apple's Payment Of €14.3B Irish Tax Would End EU Case

    Ireland has fully recovered €14.3 billion ($16.7 billion) in disputed taxes and interest from Apple Inc., the country’s finance minister announced Tuesday, prompting a top European Union official to say the move would end a court case to recoup alleged illegal aid.

  • September 18, 2018

    Mason Seeks $200M From S. Korea Over Samsung Merger

    A Mason Capital Management LLC investment fund and its general partner have launched a $200 million arbitration claim against South Korea stemming from its alleged interference in the controversial 2015 merger of two Samsung affiliates, according to documents released Tuesday by the country’s Ministry of Justice.

  • September 18, 2018

    FCC's Rosenworcel Sees Ways To Bridge The Internet Gap

    For Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, the digital age will be a success only if the government does all it can to connect underprivileged people with high-speed internet service and help local communities better serve their own residents.

  • September 18, 2018

    DC Circ. Sides With Copyright Board In SoundExchange Suit

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday refused to alter a ruling by the Copyright Royalty Board that set how much streaming services like Pandora Radio must pay for music until 2020, rejecting the argument that the board had used improper benchmarks from the private market.

  • September 18, 2018

    Rural Advocates Tout Planned Sprint, T-Mobile 5G Rollout

    The planned $59 billion merger of Sprint and T-Mobile would likely accelerate economic growth in rural regions through the rollout of the telecoms' proposed 5G network, farm state advocates have told the Federal Communications Commission.

  • September 18, 2018

    Cut Phone Captioning Costs, Broadband Cos. Tell FCC

    The Federal Communications Commission should control the spiraling costs of FCC-backed internet protocol phone captioning for the hard of hearing by further tamping down on misuse and waste in the programs and considering rate caps, broadband services have told the agency.

  • September 18, 2018

    Mobile Industry Lauds FCC's 39 GHz Reorganization Plan

    Major wireless carriers broadly support the Federal Communications Commission's plan to clear and auction the fragmented 39 GHz spectrum band, according to comments posted Tuesday, but others warned that the FCC is taking the wrong approach to license sizes and distribution.

  • September 18, 2018

    Industry, Consumers Face Off Over FCC High-Speed Bar

    The Federal Communications Commission’s annual assessment of nationwide broadband access is just getting underway, but already industry players and consumer groups are divided over whether the commission should raise the bar for what qualifies as high-speed internet service.

  • September 18, 2018

    Beijing Tees Up New Duties After Trump's $200B Strike

    The mounting trade imbroglio between the U.S. and China continued to intensify Tuesday as Beijing plowed ahead with new duties on $60 billion in U.S. goods, a day after President Donald Trump whacked $200 billion worth of Chinese goods with tariffs of his own.

  • September 18, 2018

    EU Lays Out Sweeping Vision For WTO Reform

    As the global trading system sags amid rising tensions between the U.S. and its partners, the European Union on Tuesday unveiled an informal proposal to reform the World Trade Organization by modernizing its rules, improving its oversight function and repairing its hobbled dispute settlement system.

  • September 17, 2018

    Israeli Gov’t Contractor Settles Securities Suit With $3M Deal

    Ability Inc. agreed to pay $3 million to investors to resolve a securities suit accusing the Israeli government contractor of making misleading financial statements during its bid to buy Cambridge Capital Acquisition Corp., according to a deal approved by a New York federal judge on Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Stanford's Jeff Fisher Talks Supreme Court

    Jeffrey Fisher

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Stanford Law School professor Jeffrey Fisher discusses his motivation for teaching, arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and what the court might look like if Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed.

  • Calif.'s New Rules For Lawyers Move Closer To ABA Model

    Mark Loeterman

    The first comprehensive overhaul of California's Rules of Professional Conduct in nearly 30 years becomes operational on Nov. 1. Some of the new rules mirror the model language used by the American Bar Association, but many continue to reflect California’s unique approach to certain ethical questions, says Mark Loeterman of Signature Resolution LLC.

  • Know The Limits To Atty Public Statements During A Trial

    Matthew Giardina

    The balancing act between protecting attorneys’ speech rights and ensuring unbiased adjudications was highlighted recently in two cases — when Michael Cohen applied for a restraining order against Stephanie Clifford's attorney, and when Johnson & Johnson questioned whether a Missouri talc verdict was tainted by public statements from the plaintiffs' counsel, says Matthew Giardina of Manning Gross & Massenburg LLP.

  • In Calif., Questions Remain On Law Firm Conflict Waivers

    Richard Rosensweig

    In Sheppard Mullin v. J-M Manufacturing Co., the California Supreme Court ruled last month that a law firm's failure to disclose a known conflict with another current client did not categorically disentitle the firm from recovering fees. But the court didn’t provide hoped-for guidance on how to write an enforceable advance conflict waiver, says Richard Rosensweig of Goulston & Storrs PC.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Faegre Client Development Chief Melanie Green

    Melanie Green

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Melanie Green, chief client development officer at Faegre Baker Daniels LLP.

  • 2 Courts Accept Contract Terms That Limit TCPA Exposure

    Meredith Slawe

    No other appellate court has followed the Second Circuit's Telephone Consumer Protection Act decision in Reyes. However, two district courts within the Eleventh Circuit recently did — holding that consent to be contacted cannot be unilaterally revoked where such consent was obtained in a bargained-for contract, say attorneys with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Widener's Rod Smolla Talks Free Speech

    Rodney Smolla

    In this new series featuring law school luminaries, Widener University Delaware Law School dean Rodney Smolla discusses teaching philosophies, his interest in First Amendment law, and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court in Virginia v. Black.

  • New Pass-Through Deduction Will Pass Over Many Lawyers

    Evan Morgan

    A few weeks ago, the IRS proposed regulations related to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act's 20 percent deduction on qualified business income for pass-through entities. The guidance offers long-awaited clarity, but is mostly bad news for many law firms, says Evan Morgan of Kaufman Rossin PA.

  • How Reckless Judicial Impeachments Threaten Rule Of Law

    Jan van Zyl Smit

    Judicial impeachment fever seems to be spreading through the states, with West Virginia legislators recently voting to remove their state's entire Supreme Court, and lawmakers in Pennsylvania and North Carolina threatening the same. These actions are a serious threat to judicial independence, says Jan van Zyl Smit of the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Fogel Reviews 'Good Judgment'

    Judge Jeremy Fogel

    In this time of partisan conflict over judicial selection, a new book by Canadian jurist Robert J. Sharpe —​ "Good Judgment" — represents a refreshing, deeply thoughtful departure from binary arguments about how and why judges make decisions, says U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel, director of the Federal Judicial Center.