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Telecommunications

  • August 8, 2018

    Sen. Wants FCC To Weigh Sprint, T-Mobile Deal Benefits

    Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah has asked the U.S. Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission to consider the potential pro-competitive effects from a proposed merger of Sprint and T-Mobile as the agencies consider whether to greenlight the deal.

  • August 8, 2018

    Verizon, Vehicle IP Spar Over Navigation Patent At Fed. Circ.

    Mobile navigation app patent holder Vehicle IP LLC urged a Federal Circuit panel Wednesday to revive its infringement claims against a Verizon Wireless affiliate, saying a lower court, for a second time, improperly inserted restrictive language into its claim construction when it axed the suit.

  • August 8, 2018

    Chinese Telecom Co. Slams FCC National Security 'Blacklist'

    Chinese smartphone maker Huawei has slammed the Telecommunications Industry Association for supporting a proposed Federal Communications Commission rule that would ban the use of an $8.5 billion fund to buy products or services from companies that pose a threat to U.S. security.

  • August 8, 2018

    FCC Told New Small Satellite Rules Could Create Space Junk

    SpaceX, researchers and space launch and satellite companies have told the Federal Communications Commission that they generally support plans to streamline the license requirements for small satellites capable of beaming broadband signal back to Earth, but also cautioned that untested satellites could create an orbiting pile of space junk.

  • August 8, 2018

    O'Melveny Guides Skyworks' $405M Avnera Acquisition

    California chipmaker Skyworks Solutions Inc., with assistance from O'Melveny & Myers LLP, has inked an agreement to buy semiconductor supplier Avnera Corp. for $405 million in cash, the companies said on Wednesday, in a deal meant to strengthen Skyworks’ wireless connectivity capabilities.

  • August 8, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Nixes Wi-Fi One's 2nd En Banc Bid In Patent Row

    The full Federal Circuit has rejected Wi-Fi One LLC’s bid for a second en banc rehearing of a patent case that established the inter partes review time bar can be appealed, clearing the way for the company to try to bring the issue before the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • August 8, 2018

    Monitronics Seeks Coverage In $28M Robocall Settlement

    A home security company has sued its insurers in Texas federal court, claiming they refused to honor their agreements and indemnify the company for a $28 million settlement in multidistrict litigation that accused the company of making calls to numbers listed on the National Do Not Call Registry.

  • August 7, 2018

    Cable Installer Strikes Deal With Workers In OT Suit

    Grayco Communications LP has agreed to shell out individual payments to a group of cable workers who alleged they were stiffed on overtime pay in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act, according to a proposed settlement filed Tuesday in Louisiana federal court.

  • August 7, 2018

    Sprint, Others Allowed To Join Fight Over FCC Small-Cell Rule

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday allowed Sprint Corp., the National Association of Tribal Historic Preservation Officers and others to step into a challenge to a Federal Communications Commission order exempting small-cell fixtures for next-generation, or 5G, networks from certain environmental and historic regulatory reviews.

  • August 7, 2018

    State PUCs Tell FCC Unbundling Could Concentrate Power

    State utility regulators recently pushed back against an industry group’s proposal that the Federal Communications Commission free legacy wireline companies from rules that require them to share their telephone networks with competitors at capped rates.

  • August 7, 2018

    Nez Perce Say 2.5 GHz Band Over Reservation Being Wasted

    The Nez Perce tribe has told the Federal Communications Commission that a company Sprint has acquired owns the rights to the underused 2.5 gigahertz spectrum above its reservation, but the company is not making use of the spectrum.

  • August 7, 2018

    Insurer Can’t Pause TCPA Case For FCC Rulemaking

    Farmers Insurance can't pause a proposed Telephone Consumer Protection Act class action, a Missouri federal judge ruled, saying that planned rulemaking by the Federal Communications Commission redefining automatic telephone dialing systems could take years.

  • August 7, 2018

    Mass. Top Court Nixes 911 Suit, Bars LLC Whistleblowers

    Four years of legal wrangling over 911 emergency dispatch surcharges that telephone providers pay in Massachusetts ended on Tuesday with a succinct ruling from the state's top court saying a limited liability company had no business trying to recoup roughly $200 million on behalf of the state government.

  • August 7, 2018

    Tech Co. Investor Accuses Executives Of Insider Trading

    A shareholder for a fiber optics equipment manufacturer accused the company’s directors and officers in Texas federal court on Tuesday of violating the Securities and Exchange Act by misleading shareholders about the company’s falling sales and selling off hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of shares before the company’s stock value dropped.

  • August 6, 2018

    Agencies Finalize Rules For $110M Grants To Modernize 911

    The U.S. Department of Commerce and the Department of Transportation have published final rules in the Federal Register for a $110 million grant program to facilitate support for text message, video and other internet protocol technologies at 911 call centers around the country.

  • August 6, 2018

    Comment System Take-Down Not Cyberattack, FCC Confirms

    A drastic spike in public comments brought down the FCC’s online system last summer following a segment about net neutrality on the HBO program “Last Week Tonight,” the Federal Communications Commission’s inspector general has concluded in a report, changing the agency’s original narrative that it had been the target of a cyberattack.

  • August 6, 2018

    ZwillGen Nabs Oath Atty To Aid Cos. With Gov't Data Demands

    ZwillGen has picked up an attorney with more than a decade of experience handling law enforcement and security matters both in the government and in-house at Oath and its predecessor Yahoo to help lead ZG Subpoena Solutions, which assists companies in navigating third-party requests for their data. 

  • August 6, 2018

    Split PTAB Denies Apple's Bid For IPR On Uniloc Patent

    In a 2-1 decision Monday, a Patent Trial and Appeal Board panel declined to review Apple’s challenge to a Uniloc patent related to technology for connecting telephones and computers, which the nonpracticing entity has asserted against the tech giant in one of several infringement cases it initially launched in Eastern Texas.

  • August 6, 2018

    Inmate Class Wins Cert. In GTL Phone Call Rate Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge Monday certified a national class of inmates in a suit alleging that Global Tel Link Corp. overcharged them up to 100 times the market rate for phone calls and failed to disclose charges related to administrative costs.

  • August 6, 2018

    Judge Got AT&T-Time Warner Case Wrong, DC Circ. Told

    The U.S. Department of Justice told the D.C. Circuit on Monday that a lower court ignored a fundamental economic model and basic corporate principles when it rejected the agency's effort to block AT&T's now-completed $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner.

Expert Analysis

  • Suddenly, ALJs Become Political Appointees

    Brian Casey

    Less than three weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission, President Donald Trump signed an executive order applying the court’s rationale in Lucia to the hiring — and firing — of all administrative law judges in the federal government, making them entirely beholden to the heads of their agencies or the president for their jobs, says Brian Casey of Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

  • New Privacy Laws' Unintended Impact On Bankruptcy Sales

    Walt Sapronov

    When the next downturn occurs, bankruptcies and opportunities for investors to pick up distressed assets on the cheap will follow. Where those assets include customer lists or other personal information protected by new privacy laws in the EU and California, those sales will become more difficult, say Walt Sapronov and Paul Kouroupas of Sapronov & Associates PC.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • AT&T Win May Help Partial Ownership Transactions

    Jon Dubrow

    While U.S. District Judge Richard Leon was careful to note that his opinion in the AT&T-Timer Warner merger trial was narrow, his evaluation of the evidence undercut the government's theoretical economic model in a way that may have broader applications, says John Dubrow of McDermott Will & Emery LLP.

  • Modern Communication Brings E-Discovery Challenges

    Thomas Bonk

    As new communications platforms displace email, the legal industry is awkwardly grappling with complex e-discovery questions. Fortunately, this environment provides a very fertile ground of incentives for innovation in both e-discovery technology and service offerings, says Thomas Bonk of Epiq.

  • Opinion

    It's Not All About The Benjamins, Baby (Lawyer)

    J.B. Heaton

    Notwithstanding the latest salary war among prominent law firms, I urge my middle-aged and older colleagues to help the recent graduates we know focus on the long term. Even if the salary is the same, there is a big difference between an institutional firm and the relatively younger firms matching BigLaw, says J.B. Heaton, a University of Chicago business law fellow and former partner at Bartlit Beck.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Hood Reviews 'Lawyering From The Inside Out'

    Judge Denise Hood

    Law professor Nathalie Martin's new book, "Lawyering From the Inside Out: Learning Professional Development Through Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence," can be of value to any lawyer aiming to achieve greater productivity, relieve the stress of the legal profession and focus on goals, says U.S. District Chief Judge Denise Page Hood of the Eastern District of Michigan.

  • 3 Top E-Discovery Case Law Lessons Of 2018 (So Far)

    Casey Sullivan

    The blockbuster e-discovery cases, with big sanctions and bigger controversies, have been few and far between this year. But that doesn’t mean the legal questions around e-discovery have been answered. Let’s take a closer look at three cases worthy of our attention, says Casey Sullivan, an attorney at discovery technology provider Logikcull.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Must Take A Stand Against Mandatory Arbitration

    Isabel Finley

    Later this week, Harvard Law students will begin bidding on interview slots with the nation’s top law firms. Our institutions owe it to their students not only to require firms to disclose mandatory arbitration provisions in new associate contracts, but also to bar employers from on-campus recruiting if they require these provisions, says Isabel Finley, a third-year student at Harvard Law School and president of the Harvard Women’s Law Association.