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Telecommunications

  • August 10, 2018

    Sinclair Pumps Brakes On FCC Review After Merger Call-Off

    In the wake of its canceled merger with Tribune Media Co., Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. is gearing up for a fight before an administrative law judge even while urging the Federal Communications Commission to drop the proceeding that would probe whether it misled the agency during the merger review.

  • August 10, 2018

    Apple Fights App Store Monopolization Claims At High Court

    Apple Inc. urged the U.S. Supreme Court in an opening brief on Friday to toss a proposed consumer class action claiming the technology giant illegally monopolized the iPhone app market, arguing that it acts merely as an agent for developers who set their own prices.

  • August 10, 2018

    Internet Advocates Blast FCC Copper Retirement Plan

    Communications advocacy group Public Knowledge has told the Federal Communications Commission that rural consumers could be hung out to dry by the agency's decision to expedite the approval process for telecoms wanting to switch from copper to fiber networks.

  • August 10, 2018

    After System Delays, FCC Grants Funds To Alaska School

    The Federal Communications Commission awarded more than $300,000 in funding to a small Alaskan school district that had applied for the money in 2016 but had its application held up by technical errors in the government’s filing system, according to an order.

  • August 10, 2018

    Qualcomm To Pay Taiwan Watchdog $93M To End Patent Row

    Smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm Inc. on Friday announced a $93 million settlement with Taiwan's antitrust watchdog to resolve claims the company refused to sell local manufacturers chips unless they agreed to the terms of its patent licensing, even as its licensing fight with Apple and regulators around the globe continues unabated.

  • August 9, 2018

    Sinclair Investor Sues Over Withdrawn $3.9B Tribune Deal

    A Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. investor filed a putative securities fraud class action against the company Thursday in Maryland federal court, claiming it and its top brass mangled the review process of a planned $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media Co. by knowingly misleading the public about its divestitures.

  • August 9, 2018

    'Sue Me': $1B Tribune Case Charts Where Sinclair Turned Ugly

    Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. sabotaged the favorable odds of completing a highly profitable merger by picking fights with regulators, taunting the DOJ antitrust head to "sue me," and aggressively defending divestiture proposals that government officials were sure to reject, according to a new lawsuit. Here’s a look at the major mistakes Tribune alleges its would-be acquirer made leading up to the deal’s cutoff date Wednesday.

  • August 9, 2018

    'Smart Cities' Can Be Easily Hacked, Researchers Warn

    Hackers could remotely mount "supervillain-level" attacks on so-called smart cities — which use digital systems to coordinate city resources — by exploiting a series of basic security flaws, researchers warned at a cybersecurity conference on Thursday.

  • August 9, 2018

    Wireless Co. Ubiquiti Says Rival Sells Hacking Firmware

    Wireless networking company Ubiquiti Networks Inc. hit rival Cambium Networks Inc. with copyright infringement, fraud and antitrust claims in Illinois federal court over allegations Cambium is selling firmware that hacks Ubiquiti's devices and uses them as a launching point for its wireless service.

  • August 9, 2018

    Comcast Gets PTAB Nix Of TiVo's Programming Guide Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board invalidated as obvious an on-screen TV programming guide patent held by a TiVo Corp. subsidiary, handing a victory to Comcast Corp. in a wide-ranging intellectual property war between the two entertainment companies.

  • August 9, 2018

    FCC's O'Rielly Slams UN Telecom Regulator For Overreach

    Federal Communications Commissioner Michael O'Rielly torched a United Nations telecom agency that he says has strayed too far afield from its primary mission and suffers from structural and leadership problems.

  • August 9, 2018

    Tribune Kills $3.9B Sinclair Deal, Files Lawsuit

    Tribune Media Co. said Thursday it has ended its planned $3.9 billion combination with Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. and sued its former acquirer in Delaware for mangling the review process with “unnecessarily aggressive and protracted negotiations” with regulators.

  • August 8, 2018

    TV Industry Giants Fixed Local Ad Prices, Law Firm Says

    A Georgia-based law firm slapped the television industry’s largest media companies, including Tribune Media Co., Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., with a proposed class action in Illinois federal court Wednesday, claiming that they have been working together to inflate local advertising prices in violation of federal antitrust laws.

  • August 8, 2018

    Google, Microsoft Reveal Rare Collab Over Massive Chip Flaw

    Security researchers from Google and Microsoft on Wednesday revealed that they had an unusual ally — each other  —  as they raced to devise patches to fight the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" security bugs that exposed nearly every computer chip in the world to hackers.

  • August 8, 2018

    Mexican Hotel Can Subpoena Facebook For Info On Defamer

    A California federal court on Wednesday granted a Mexican hotel chain's request to force Facebook Inc. to disclose the identity of a user who used the social media platform to make allegedly defamatory statements about the hotel group, prompting national media attention and economic losses.

  • August 8, 2018

    Sen. Wants FCC To Weigh Sprint, T-Mobile Deal Benefits

    Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah has asked the U.S. Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission to consider the potential pro-competitive effects from a proposed merger of Sprint and T-Mobile as the agencies consider whether to greenlight the deal.

  • August 8, 2018

    Verizon, Vehicle IP Spar Over Navigation Patent At Fed. Circ.

    Mobile navigation app patent holder Vehicle IP LLC urged a Federal Circuit panel Wednesday to revive its infringement claims against a Verizon Wireless affiliate, saying a lower court, for a second time, improperly inserted restrictive language into its claim construction when it axed the suit.

  • August 8, 2018

    Chinese Telecom Co. Slams FCC National Security 'Blacklist'

    Chinese smartphone maker Huawei has slammed the Telecommunications Industry Association for supporting a proposed Federal Communications Commission rule that would ban the use of an $8.5 billion fund to buy products or services from companies that pose a threat to U.S. security.

  • August 8, 2018

    FCC Told New Small Satellite Rules Could Create Space Junk

    SpaceX, researchers and space launch and satellite companies have told the Federal Communications Commission that they generally support plans to streamline the license requirements for small satellites capable of beaming broadband signal back to Earth, but also cautioned that untested satellites could create an orbiting pile of space junk.

  • August 8, 2018

    O'Melveny Guides Skyworks' $405M Avnera Acquisition

    California chipmaker Skyworks Solutions Inc., with assistance from O'Melveny & Myers LLP, has inked an agreement to buy semiconductor supplier Avnera Corp. for $405 million in cash, the companies said on Wednesday, in a deal meant to strengthen Skyworks’ wireless connectivity capabilities.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Hood Reviews 'Lawyering From The Inside Out'

    Judge Denise Hood

    Law professor Nathalie Martin's new book, "Lawyering From the Inside Out: Learning Professional Development Through Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence," can be of value to any lawyer aiming to achieve greater productivity, relieve the stress of the legal profession and focus on goals, says U.S. District Chief Judge Denise Page Hood of the Eastern District of Michigan.

  • 3 Top E-Discovery Case Law Lessons Of 2018 (So Far)

    Casey Sullivan

    The blockbuster e-discovery cases, with big sanctions and bigger controversies, have been few and far between this year. But that doesn’t mean the legal questions around e-discovery have been answered. Let’s take a closer look at three cases worthy of our attention, says Casey Sullivan, an attorney at discovery technology provider Logikcull.

  • Opinion

    Law Schools Must Take A Stand Against Mandatory Arbitration

    Isabel Finley

    Later this week, Harvard Law students will begin bidding on interview slots with the nation’s top law firms. Our institutions owe it to their students not only to require firms to disclose mandatory arbitration provisions in new associate contracts, but also to bar employers from on-campus recruiting if they require these provisions, says Isabel Finley, a third-year student at Harvard Law School and president of the Harvard Women’s Law Association.

  • Myths And Facts About Using TAR Across Borders

    John Tredennick

    Many legal teams involved in cross-border matters still hesitate to use technology assisted review, questioning its ability to handle non-English document collections. However, with the proper expertise, modern TAR can be used with any language, including challenging Asian languages, say John Tredennick and David Sannar of Catalyst Repository Systems.

  • 2 Takeaways From The AT&T-Time Warner Ruling

    Nathaniel Wackman

    A D.C. federal judge's decision last month in United States v. AT&T contains important insights that will be influential well beyond the confines of the now-completed $85 billion merger between AT&T and Time Warner, say Nathaniel Wackman and Lee Van Voorhis of Jenner & Block LLP.

  • Roundup

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer

    From Lawmaker To Lawyer

    Earlier this year, Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., made headlines with his decision to leave Congress and return to law. ​​In this series, former members of Congress who made that move discuss how their experience on the Hill influenced their law practice.

  • Opinion

    A Trump Supreme Court Nominee Can Be Defeated

    Nan Aron

    The Senate Republican leadership and the Trump administration are racing to fill Justice Anthony Kennedy’s spot on the U.S. Supreme Court. Does opposition to their plans have any chance of success? My answer is yes, because the stakes are so high, people are so engaged, and the records of those short-listed are so deeply troubling, says Nan Aron, president of Alliance for Justice.

  • Is It Time For A Challenge To Chevron Deference?

    Joseph Diedrich

    In a recent concurring opinion, outgoing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy expressed some skepticism over the scope of the "Chevron deference" doctrine, which requires federal courts to defer to an administrative agency’s "reasonable" interpretation of an ambiguous statute. Overturning or limiting Chevron could have a profound effect on the power of federal agencies, says Joseph Diedrich of Husch Blackwell LLP.

  • Limiting Law Firms' Professional Liability Risks: Part 3

    Stuart Pattison

    As clients increasingly look to limit their own liability exposure, they can reasonably expect that their retained counsel should do the same. In this context, a carefully crafted, thoughtfully presented engagement letter can help a law firm strike a successful balance between protecting itself and preserving a client relationship, say Stuart Pattison and John Muller of Sompo International Holdings Ltd.

  • New Stats On Millennial Attorney Disciplinary Actions

    Jean Edwards

    In this analysis of disciplinary action trends in the legal industry, Edwards Neils LLC managing member Jean Edwards examines data provided by bar organizations for 17 states and the District of Columbia.