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Telecommunications

  • October 10, 2018

    Treasury Rolls Out New Rules Widening CFIUS Authority

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury has rolled out a set of new temporary regulations expanding the authority of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, in an effort to ramp up protections for critical American technologies.

  • October 10, 2018

    Let Phone Cos. Do More To Block Robocalls, AGs Tell FCC

    New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood and 34 other state attorneys general have urged the Federal Communications Commission to create new rules that will authorize telephone service providers to block illegal robocalls made to consumers across the country.

  • October 10, 2018

    Man Who Sold Bank Info To Russian Trolls To Serve 6 Mos.

    A California man who pled guilty to selling stolen bank account information later used by Russian online trolls to arrange payments related to an alleged influence campaign intended to tip the 2016 election toward President Donald Trump was sentenced in D.C. federal court Wednesday to six months in prison.

  • October 9, 2018

    Class Action Says DirecTV Partner Regularly Docks Wages

    DirecTV’s largest installation partner, MasTec Inc., was hit with a class action on Tuesday claiming the Florida-based service provider docks employee wages when customers complain about technical glitches to DirecTV.

  • October 9, 2018

    Google Appeals €4.3B EU Fine In Android Antitrust Case

    Google Inc. said Tuesday that it has appealed a record €4.34 billion ($5.04 billion) fine the European Union’s antitrust enforcer doled out in July for abusing the dominance of its Android mobile phone operating system, just before its mid-October compliance deadline.

  • October 9, 2018

    Top 3 Groups Lobbying The FCC

    Lobbyists at the Federal Communications Commission stepped up their arguments last month for why the agency should approve the proposed Sprint-T-Mobile merger and doubled down on backing changes to local small-cell siting rules and the Citizens Broadband Radio Service framework.

  • October 9, 2018

    Mexico Looks To Nix Telco Owners' $500M NAFTA Claim

    Mexico has urged an international tribunal to toss a $500 million North American Free Trade Agreement arbitration claim from a telecommunications company's investors who say the country destroyed their business in favor of Mexico's dominant telecom, arguing the claims are based on a "wholly illogical and improbable idea."

  • October 9, 2018

    Congress Told Satellite Retransmission Act Should Expire

    The National Association of Broadcasters has urged Congress not to renew legislation that allows satellite companies to transmit out-of-market TV stations into a local market, saying the legislation unfairly benefits the companies and hurts consumers by denying them important local news and charging them higher prices.

  • October 9, 2018

    FCC Moves To Bolster Small AM Radio Stations

    The Federal Communications Commission has floated several ways to boost access to the airwaves for small AM radio stations, especially at night, while also preventing these smaller stations from interfering with some of the most powerful stations on the AM band.

  • October 9, 2018

    Infrastructure Group Calls On FCC To Harmonize Tower Regs

    The Wireless Infrastructure Association has told the Federal Communications Commission that it should harmonize competing rules that apply to expanding already installed wireless facilities as a way to speed up 5G deployment.

  • October 9, 2018

    Apple Opposes Qualcomm's Dismissal Bid In Patent Fight

    Apple asked a California federal court to deny Qualcomm’s bid to dismiss portions of a sweeping patent case, saying the chipmaker's promise not to sue over nine patents does not address other claims at issue in the dispute.

  • October 9, 2018

    Network Capacity Buyers Shut Out Of EU Merger Row

    The European Union's top court ruled Tuesday that the European Commission made no legally binding decisions, and thus created no appeals rights, when dealing with telecommunications companies that tried to pick up network capacity that Telefónica Deutschland Holding AG was forced to shell out as part of a merger deal.

  • October 9, 2018

    Trump Says China 'Not Ready' To Strike Tariff Truce

    President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he has rebuffed China’s efforts to hold negotiations aimed at ending the two governments’ escalating tariff battle, declaring that Beijing is “not ready” to make necessary concessions to the U.S. government.

  • October 5, 2018

    Verizon Jumped Gun By Changing Call Fees, Pa. Agency Finds

    Verizon shouldn’t have decided on its own to reduce a telecom’s fees for calls that got routed through the internet based on its own view of a Federal Communications Commission order, a Pennsylvania judge has ruled.

  • October 5, 2018

    Wilkinson Barker Nabs Veteran Telecom Atty As Sr. Adviser

    Telecom industry attorney Michael Nelson has been snapped up as the new senior adviser for the Denver office of Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP, where he will run the public policy shop, the firm said Friday.

  • October 5, 2018

    Preliminary Privacy Settlement Over BART App OK'd By Judge

    A California federal magistrate judge has approved a preliminary settlement for a class that claims Bay Area Rapid Transit secretly collected riders' personal information through a mobile app promoted as a public safety measure.

  • October 5, 2018

    Apple Wants To Hang Up FaceTime Failure Suit

    Apple Inc. has urged a California federal court to toss a consumer class action alleging the tech giant intentionally broke the FaceTime video chat service on older iPhones, arguing iPhone 4 customers didn't adequately back up their damages claims and were improperly suing over the company's design choices.

  • October 5, 2018

    Verizon OK'd For Cell Tower, Ending Dispute With Mass. Town

    A Massachusetts federal court approved a settlement sought by Verizon when it overturned a Massachusetts town’s zoning board’s decision to deny the company an application to build a cell tower and gave it a special permit to construct the tower.

  • October 5, 2018

    Ericsson Insists HTC Must Prove SEP Royalties Breach

    Cellphone maker HTC America Inc., which is suing Swedish telecom Ericsson Inc. in Texas federal court for allegedly overcharging for aging standard-essential patents, bears the burden of proof for its breach-of-contract claim, Ericsson has said in a brief.

  • October 5, 2018

    Eastern European Bloc Backs Digital Tax

    A bloc of Eastern European states said Friday that they were supporting the European Union’s temporary digital tax.

Expert Analysis

  • Assessing 'Concreteness' Under Spokeo In Northern Illinois

    Alex Egbert

    The U.S. Supreme Court's Spokeo decision left lower courts to flesh out history's and Congress' “important roles” when developing a workable legal standard for deciding whether an intangible injury is sufficiently “concrete.” Not surprisingly, the Northern District of Illinois “concreteness” determinations relying on Congress’ role tend to be ad hoc, say Alex Egbert and Tony Hopp of Steptoe & Johnson LLP.

  • Standard-Setting Participation Can Affect Patent Enforceability

    Jim Burger

    The Federal Circuit's decision in Core Wireless v. Apple shows that failing to read the fine print on membership obligations to standards-setting bodies can lead to consequences for patents held by companies or acquired from other standards participants, say Jim Burger and Michael Parks of Thompson Coburn LLP.

  • 'High Availability' — A Key Term In Law Firm IT Strategy

    Jeff Norris

    While most law firm executives and partners may instinctively want to tune out terms like "high availability" and "disaster recovery" — concepts that IT managers usually worry about — there are five reasons you should lean in and wrestle with the vocabulary, say Jeff Norris of Managed Technology Services LLC and Greg Inge of information security consulting firm CQR.

  • The 'Post-Fact' Jury In The 'Fake News' Era

    Ross Laguzza

    The "fake news" phenomenon is ever more prominent in the political arena — but not in the jury box. At a trial, jurors don’t have to rely on the media or any other source to tell them the facts and issues, since they have a front-row seat to the action, says Ross Laguzza, a consultant at R&D Strategic Solutions LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • Internet Of Things Cos. Must Prepare For Law Enforcement

    Matthew Gardner

    As the internet of things device market develops, companies that proactively develop compliance strategies should be able to avoid many of the pitfalls that are sure to come as law enforcement changes the way it investigates cases, say attorneys at Wiley Rein LLP.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Japan's Balanced Approach To SEP Licensing

    David Kappos

    The Japan Patent Office's new guide to licensing for standard-essential patents maintains an admirable neutrality in tone, language and substance, making it an effective reference tool for all sides in SEP licensing, says David Kappos, a partner at Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP and former director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.