Telecommunications

  • June 15, 2021

    LG Settles With Ex-Microsoft Worker Days Before IP Jury Trial

    LG Electronics has inked a confidential settlement with a former Microsoft employee over his widely asserted cellphone security patent, just days before the dispute was to go before a jury in a Texas federal court.

  • June 15, 2021

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    COVID-19 pandemic reopening plans over the past week focused on summer festivities, paving the way for the return of the New York State Fair at full capacity, a $95 million tourism comeback plan for California and the possibility of permanent to-go cocktails in Pennsylvania.

  • June 15, 2021

    US, EU Pledge Cooperation As Metal Tariff Battle Lingers

    The U.S. and European Union forged a new high-level dialogue on technology and trade issues at their bilateral summit Tuesday, but they remain at odds over how to resolve a dispute over U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum.

  • June 15, 2021

    Lina Khan Named FTC Chair After Confirmation

    Hours after she was confirmed Tuesday as the latest member of the Federal Trade Commission, Lina Khan was named its new chair and sworn in.

  • June 14, 2021

    FCC Issues Best Practices To Rein In Hospital Robocalls

    The best way to get hospitals on board with a set of protocols designed to protect them from a barrage of illegal robocalls is to provide education and outreach about how the practices will benefit them, according to the Federal Communications Commission.

  • June 14, 2021

    CenturyLink Asks Minn. Regulator To Ditch Old Landline Rules

    Landlines aren't as important as they used to be and telecoms shouldn't have to give them priority for repairs, CenturyLink told Minnesota's utility regulator in a petition to update the rules to allow companies to focus on bolstering broadband.

  • June 14, 2021

    Insurer Settles Over Defending Hulk Hogan Sex Tape Suit

    Cox Radio Inc. and Hiscox Insurance Co. agreed to settle a dispute Monday over whether Hiscox refused in bad faith to cover legal bills a Cox radio station incurred fighting claims that one of its DJs leaked a sex tape of retired pro wrestler Hulk Hogan.

  • June 14, 2021

    FTC Poised For 3rd Dem As Senate Sets Final Vote On Khan

    Senators teed up Lina Khan for final confirmation to the Federal Trade Commission on Monday, pushing forward to give Democrats on the FTC a third, decisive vote that could help usher in a new wave of far more aggressive antitrust enforcement.

  • June 14, 2021

    Steam Game Platform Owner Appeals EU Geo-Blocking Ruling

    Valve Corp. has appealed a decision from European enforcers imposing a €1.6 million ($1.94 million) penalty on the Steam video game platform's owner for allegedly helping publishers prevent cross-border sales of some games through a practice known as geo-blocking.

  • June 14, 2021

    IT Biz Says 'Catch-All' Exclusion Doesn't Bar BIPA Coverage

    Illinois-based information technology company Wynndalco Enterprises is pushing back against its insurer's attempt to avoid covering two biometric privacy class actions, saying a policy exclusion cited by the insurer doesn't bar claims made under Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act.

  • June 14, 2021

    Mass. Justices Back Barstool's Phone Trick On Mayor

    A Barstool Sports podcast host who lied about his identity to land an interview with a Massachusetts mayor didn't break a state law banning secret recordings, Massachusetts' high court said Monday.

  • June 11, 2021

    AT&T Pushes Back Against Parts Of Biden Broadband Plan

    Communications giant AT&T is pushing back on elements of the Biden administration's infrastructure proposals, particularly a plan to partner with local governments, asserting support for municipalities could become politicized and broadband affordability hasn't reached a crisis level.

  • June 11, 2021

    WTO Ends Trump's Case Over China's Patent Rules

    The World Trade Organization quietly ended its investigation into China over its patent licensing rules on Friday, two years after the Trump administration put the case on ice in lieu of intellectual property negotiations with Beijing.

  • June 11, 2021

    House Lawmakers Float Bipartisan Big Tech Bills

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced a package of legislation in the U.S. House on Friday aimed at reining in large technology companies and restoring competition in digital markets, including a measure barring the tech giants from competing on their own platforms.

  • June 11, 2021

    Justices Urged To Nix 'Devastating' IPR Rulings In $44M Case

    Ultratec has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a series of 2019 Federal Circuit orders summarily affirming Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions that invalidated eight of its closed-caption patents, saying the decisions imperil a $44 million jury verdict it won against rival CaptionCall.

  • June 11, 2021

    FCC Orders Carrier To Repay AT&T, Verizon For Juicing Traffic

    The Federal Communications Commission has ordered a local phone carrier to repay millions of dollars it charged AT&T and Verizon for directing callers to highly trafficked conference calling services.

  • June 11, 2021

    Would Google Work As A Common Carrier? Experts Doubtful

    Conservative officials are trying a new way to rein in Big Tech, but experts from across the political spectrum wonder if the Ohio attorney general's lawsuit seeking to declare Google a common carrier can succeed legally or practically.

  • June 11, 2021

    NY's $15 Low-Income Internet Law Is Put On Hold

    A New York federal judge on Friday blocked the Empire State at least temporarily from enforcing a requirement for internet plans capped at $15 for qualifying low-income households, a plan that had triggered a legal challenge from across the telecom industry.

  • June 11, 2021

    Huawei Gets PTAB To Eye 2 Patents Involved In WDTX Suits

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has agreed to review whether two Brazos Licensing and Development communications patents are invalid, giving a boost to Huawei in its effort to fend off a dozen infringement suits from Brazos in the Western District of Texas.

  • June 10, 2021

    Bank Shakes TCPA Row After Facebook Autodialer Ruling

    A South Carolina federal judge has tossed a lawsuit accusing USAA Federal Savings Bank of violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by placing unwanted debt collection calls, finding that the dialing equipment the bank used didn't fit within the narrow autodialer definition recently laid out by the U.S. Supreme Court in a dispute involving Facebook. 

  • June 10, 2021

    Ill. City Goes After Netflix, Hulu Over Franchise Fees

    East St. Louis, Illinois, became the latest city to accuse Hulu and Netflix of illegally providing video service in its city limits by failing to comply with a state law and register as a franchise and pay fees for use of public rights-of-way.

  • June 10, 2021

    Google Poised To Escape Kids' Data Collection Suit

    A California federal judge indicated during a hearing Thursday that parents accusing Google and other companies of illegally collecting children's personal information through YouTube for targeted advertisements have so far failed to show that the plaintiffs' state law privacy claims aren't preempted by the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.

  • June 10, 2021

    Ex-NHLer Fired For Podcast Joke Can't Sue For Discrimination

    An NHL-player-turned-NBC-analyst who was fired for making off-color comments about a female co-worker on a podcast cannot sue for sex discrimination simply because he's a man, a New York federal judge said Thursday.

  • June 10, 2021

    Rural ISP Accuses Tribal Rival Of Frequency Extortion

    A small internet and wireless service provider has accused the Round Valley Indian Tribes and its preferred ISP, All Tribal Networks, of leveraging an improperly issued Federal Communications Commission radio license to interfere with the rural ISP's wireless transmissions and poach its customers.

  • June 10, 2021

    'Hijacked' Telecom's Investors Enter Brawl For $1.3B Award

    Investors in a satellite communications service provider have chased a division of India's space agency to the Ninth Circuit in their desperate fight to save a $1.3 billion arbitral award before government officials can liquidate the company.

Expert Analysis

  • What Private Cos. Can Learn From Biden Cybersecurity Order

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    Following the Colonial Pipeline hack, President Joe Biden's recent executive order mandating cybersecurity improvements at federal agencies offers a blueprint for private sector companies that need to modernize their own cybersecurity practices, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Don't Forget Due Diligence In Race For Lateral Associate Hires

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    Amid high demand for associates and aggressive competition to attract talent, law firms should take three key steps to conduct meaningful prehire due diligence and safeguard against lateral hiring mistakes that can hurt their revenue and reputation, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • Addressing Environmental Justice As Part Of ESG Initiatives

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    Recent calls for racial equity and government regulators' increasing focus on social and environmental concerns make this a good time for companies to integrate environmental justice into their environmental, social and governance efforts, say Stacey Halliday and Julius Redd at Beveridge & Diamond, and Jesse Glickstein at Hewlett Packard.

  • How Tech Race Bill Expands CFIUS Purview To Academia

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    A recently proposed bill that extends Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States oversight to certain foreign funding of U.S. academic institutions highlights policymakers’ view that higher education institutions are not exempt from ongoing policy and legal efforts to press the U.S.-China technology race, says Hdeel Abdelhady at MassPoint Legal.

  • Lessons In Civility From The Alex Oh Sanctions Controversy

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    Alex Oh’s abrupt departure from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and admonishment by a D.C. federal judge over conduct in an Exxon human rights case demonstrate three major costs of incivility to lawyers, and highlight the importance of teaching civility in law school, says David Grenardo at St. Mary's University.

  • Opinion

    Biz Record Admissibility Rule Must Adapt To An ESI World

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    The federal rule that permits the use of business records as evidence must be amended to address the unreliability of electronically stored information and inconsistent court frameworks on email admissibility, say Josh Sohn and Nadia Zivkov at Stroock.

  • Overlooked Patent Cases: Preclusion's Effect On Settlement

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    Recent, potentially overlooked federal district court decisions expanding the scope of a patent litigation preclusion doctrine demonstrate that parties must consider the long-reaching preclusive impact of dismissing suits with prejudice when drafting terms of settlement agreements, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Opinion

    Justices Must Weigh Class Cert. Denial Stats In Goldman Case

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    In resolving the issues presented in Goldman Sachs v. Arkansas Teacher Retirement System, the U.S. Supreme Court should consider the infrequency with which class certification is denied in securities class actions, and the high costs inflicted on publicly traded companies and their investors, say Jared Gerber and Allison Kim at Cleary.

  • Insurance Could Be A Solution To Microchip Shortage Losses

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    To the extent that companies experiencing lost income from the global microchip shortage have contingent business interruption or dependent property coverage and can trace their impaired revenues to physical loss or damage to a supplier, there may be some potential for insurance recovery, says Micah Skidmore at Haynes and Boone.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Rodriguez Reviews 'When Machines Can Be Judge'

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    Katherine Forrest's new book, "When Machines Can Be Judge, Jury, and Executioner," raises valid transparency concerns about artificial intelligence tools used by judges when making bail and sentencing decisions, but her argument that such tools should be rejected outright is less than convincing, says U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez of the Western District of Texas.

  • Transferring EU Data To US After New Contractual Safeguards

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    To comply with forthcoming European Commission standard contractual clauses, EU companies transferring personal data to the U.S. should consider sending U.S. intelligence agencies a supplemental letter to ensure they recognize transfers as U.S. person communications that cannot be targeted, says Alan Raul at Sidley.

  • 5 Steps For Law Firms Rethinking Flexible Work Post-COVID

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    A flexible work environment will be key to recruiting and retention efforts post-pandemic, so law firms must develop comprehensive policies that solidify expectations and boundaries on accommodations such as flextime, remote work and reduced hours, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What UK's New Merger Controls Mean For Private Equity

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    Expansive notification and approval requirements under the U.K.’s new merger control regime — the National Security and Investment Act — along with a lack of clarity about when they go into effect, pose unique challenges for private equity sponsors, as well as their investors and portfolio companies, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • How 5-Year-Old Defend Trade Secrets Act Has Met Its Goals

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    Case law and data reveal that, five years after its enactment, the Defend Trade Secrets Act has opened up federal courts to litigants and has proven effective against extraterritorial misappropriation, while concerns about inconsistency and overuse of ex parte seizures have not borne out, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

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