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Telecommunications

  • September 18, 2018

    DC Circ. Sides With Copyright Board In SoundExchange Suit

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday refused to alter a ruling by the Copyright Royalty Board that set how much streaming services like Pandora Radio must pay for music until 2020, rejecting the argument that the board had used improper benchmarks from the private market.

  • September 18, 2018

    Rural Advocates Tout Planned Sprint, T-Mobile 5G Rollout

    The planned $59 billion merger of Sprint and T-Mobile would likely accelerate economic growth in rural regions through the rollout of the telecoms' proposed 5G network, farm state advocates have told the Federal Communications Commission.

  • September 18, 2018

    Cut Phone Captioning Costs, Broadband Cos. Tell FCC

    The Federal Communications Commission should control the spiraling costs of FCC-backed internet protocol phone captioning for the hard of hearing by further tamping down on misuse and waste in the programs and considering rate caps, broadband services have told the agency.

  • September 18, 2018

    Mobile Industry Lauds FCC's 39 GHz Reorganization Plan

    Major wireless carriers broadly support the Federal Communications Commission's plan to clear and auction the fragmented 39 GHz spectrum band, according to comments posted Tuesday, but others warned that the FCC is taking the wrong approach to license sizes and distribution.

  • September 18, 2018

    Industry, Consumers Face Off Over FCC High-Speed Bar

    The Federal Communications Commission’s annual assessment of nationwide broadband access is just getting underway, but already industry players and consumer groups are divided over whether the commission should raise the bar for what qualifies as high-speed internet service.

  • September 18, 2018

    Beijing Tees Up New Duties After Trump's $200B Strike

    The mounting trade imbroglio between the U.S. and China continued to intensify Tuesday as Beijing plowed ahead with new duties on $60 billion in U.S. goods, a day after President Donald Trump whacked $200 billion worth of Chinese goods with tariffs of his own.

  • September 18, 2018

    EU Lays Out Sweeping Vision For WTO Reform

    As the global trading system sags amid rising tensions between the U.S. and its partners, the European Union on Tuesday unveiled an informal proposal to reform the World Trade Organization by modernizing its rules, improving its oversight function and repairing its hobbled dispute settlement system.

  • September 17, 2018

    Israeli Gov’t Contractor Settles Securities Suit With $3M Deal

    Ability Inc. agreed to pay $3 million to investors to resolve a securities suit accusing the Israeli government contractor of making misleading financial statements during its bid to buy Cambridge Capital Acquisition Corp., according to a deal approved by a New York federal judge on Monday.

  • September 17, 2018

    Calif. Starts Ball Rolling With Novel Internet Of Things Law

    California is poised to become the first state to enact rules mandating security features for internet-connected devices, marking a modest first step in what is likely to be a flurry of activity in the coming years to more tightly regulate emerging technologies at the state and federal levels, experts say.

  • September 17, 2018

    Cities' Input Shut Out Of Infrastructure Order, FCC Told

    Local government stakeholders were silenced during the process of drafting the Federal Communications Commission's upcoming order that sets timelines and fee schedules for new small cells, and localities' views have been consistently misrepresented to the commission, according to a member of the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee.

  • September 17, 2018

    AT&T's Quick Win In Ethernet Patent Suit Upheld By Fed. Circ.

    The Federal Circuit on Monday affirmed a Texas district court’s decision to grant AT&T a quick win in Advanced Media Networks' suit alleging the telecommunications giant infringed on a patent covering technology used to wirelessly connect to the internet, saying that a key term was construed correctly.

  • September 17, 2018

    Charter Pushes For Cable Rate-Control Relief In Mass., Hawaii

    An emerging threat from new online TV streaming competitors calls for freeing the cable business from rate caps in dozens of Massachusetts markets and a Hawaiian island, telecom giant Charter has argued in a new request to the Federal Communications Commission.

  • September 17, 2018

    FCC's O'Rielly Talks Spectrum Auctions And Innovation

    For FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly, speeding spectrum auctions and coordinating international policy goals are some of the keys to rolling out 5G networks and unlocking future telecom innovations.

  • September 17, 2018

    Perkins Coie Adds Veteran Telecom, Media Partner In D.C.

    Perkins Coie LLP announced Friday that it has hired a former partner at Steptoe & Johnson LLP with experience advising satellite, telecommunications and new media companies on regulatory issues, and expertise in net neutrality.

  • September 17, 2018

    North Korea Hits Back At Sony, WannaCry Hacking Charges

    North Korea has shot back at a U.S. federal complaint alleging that a North Korean government-backed programmer was behind the 2014 hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. and destructive "WannaCry" cyberattacks that cost the global economy hundreds of millions of dollars, calling the charges a "smear campaign."

  • September 17, 2018

    TelexFree Admits Massive Telecom Scam, Securities Abuses

    The scam corporations behind one of the world's largest pyramid schemes, TelexFree Inc. and TelexFree LLC, admitted Monday to securities fraud that federal agents believe swindled more than 1 million people, a move signaling the end of criminal charges and a lawsuit that halted the massive scheme in its tracks in 2014.

  • September 14, 2018

    The Privacy Fight For Digital Data Warrants Is Just Starting

    Lower courts are already grappling with the U.S. Supreme Court's June ruling in Carpenter v. U.S. telling authorities to get a warrant for cellphone location data, which privacy lawyers say is just the tip of the iceberg as disputes loom about other types of digital data that can reveal intimate details about someone's life.

  • September 14, 2018

    US Must Push For Flexible Int'l Spectrum Use, Experts Say

    Global superpowers tasked with coordinating international spectrum often do not share the same favorable view of flexible use of the airwaves, and these competing interests are likely to be problematic in the next year when the standards-setting body ITU convenes, policy experts said Thursday during Mobile World Congress Americas events in Los Angeles.

  • September 14, 2018

    Telecom Groups Ask Justices Not To Hear Net Neutrality Suit

    Three major telecommunications groups submitted a brief Friday urging the U.S. Supreme Court not to review a D.C. Circuit decision that upheld the 2015 Open Internet Order, which the Federal Communications Commission overturned in 2017.

  • September 14, 2018

    Indian Telecom Co. Wants $563M Satellite Deal Award OK'd

    An Indian telecommunications company asked a Washington federal court to confirm an over $562.5 million award stemming from claims that a commercial division of its country’s space program unlawfully axed a satellite-leasing deal, saying multiple international tribunals and arbitrators have found that the termination was wrong.

Expert Analysis

  • The 'Post-Fact' Jury In The 'Fake News' Era

    Ross Laguzza

    The "fake news" phenomenon is ever more prominent in the political arena — but not in the jury box. At a trial, jurors don’t have to rely on the media or any other source to tell them the facts and issues, since they have a front-row seat to the action, says Ross Laguzza, a consultant at R&D Strategic Solutions LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Lipez Reviews 'Last Great Colonial Lawyer'

    Judge Kermit Lipez

    In his new book, "The Last Great Colonial Lawyer: The Life and Legacy of Jeremiah Gridley," Charles McKirdy argues that Gridley — someone I had never heard of — was the last great colonial lawyer, and that his cases illuminate his times. The author largely substantiates both claims, says First Circuit Judge Kermit Lipez.

  • Internet Of Things Cos. Must Prepare For Law Enforcement

    Matthew Gardner

    As the internet of things device market develops, companies that proactively develop compliance strategies should be able to avoid many of the pitfalls that are sure to come as law enforcement changes the way it investigates cases, say attorneys at Wiley Rein LLP.

  • Interview Essentials For Attorneys On The Move

    Eileen Decker

    Across the country this fall, recent law school graduates, law firm associates and experienced professionals will interview for positions in private practice and government service. Sharing tips on how to stand out in this high-pressure, hypercompetitive process are Eileen Decker, former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, and Keith Jacoby, co-chairman of Littler Mendelson PC’s class action practice group.

  • Japan's Balanced Approach To SEP Licensing

    David Kappos

    The Japan Patent Office's new guide to licensing for standard-essential patents maintains an admirable neutrality in tone, language and substance, making it an effective reference tool for all sides in SEP licensing, says David Kappos, a partner at Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP and former director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  • Roundup

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Clerking For Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the U.S. Supreme Court 25 years ago and is not planning to retire anytime soon — she has hired clerks through 2020. What's it like to assist Justice Ginsburg? In this series, former clerks reflect on the experience.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 3 Surprises

    David Post

    It had never occurred to me that judges don’t always love the way their appellate cousins review their work and tell them — in public — all the things they got wrong. I was frequently struck by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s acute awareness of the delicacy of this relationship, says attorney David Post.

  • ERISA Class Actions After Epic Systems

    James Baker

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's opinion in Epic Systems v. Lewis employed the same analytics used by Justice Antonin Scalia in three previous decisions. They strongly suggest the court would allow a mandatory arbitration clause with a class action waiver in the Employee Retirement Income Security Act context, says James Baker of Baker McKenzie.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: A Superhero Supreme

    Burden Walker

    As a clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, my job was to mirror my boss’ views and values in everything I did. Years later, I find that I am still striving to live up to the values Justice Ginsburg instilled in me, as both a lawyer and a spouse, says Burden Walker, an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland.

  • Series

    Clerking For Ginsburg: 4 RBG Lessons On Having It All

    Rachel Wainer Apter

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is everything she is cracked up to be​ — f​eminist icon​, brilliant jurist​, fierce dissenter. She is also an incredible boss, mentor and friend.​ ​Her advice has shaped how I have tried to balance building a career and ​raising children, says Rachel Wainer Apter, counsel to the New Jersey attorney general.