Telecommunications

  • May 14, 2021

    Apple CEO, Execs On Deck For 3rd Week Of Epic Games Trial

    Apple Inc. is expected to call its top brass and corporate CEO Tim Cook to testify before the close of evidence over the next week in Epic Games' high-stakes antitrust bench trial over Apple's App Store payment policies, with the first defense witness taking the stand after Epic wraps its case-in-chief on Monday.

  • May 14, 2021

    Apple's App Store Runs On 79% Operating Margin, Judge Told

    An accounting expert hired by Epic Games Inc. testified during a high-stakes antitrust bench trial Friday that Apple Inc.'s App Store operating margins verged on an eye-watering 79% in 2018 and 2019, based on data he said he received "directly from the files" of Apple CEO Tim Cook.

  • May 14, 2021

    DC Circ. Shocked AT&T, Iowa Carrier In Dark About Own Deal

    AT&T and an Iowa-based local exchange carrier may finally be winding down their long-running rate dispute, but they weren't ready to field questions about a tentative deal Friday, which perplexed the D.C. Circuit panel assembled to hear their second appeal in the matter.

  • May 14, 2021

    Biden's Cybersecurity Order Likely To Reach Beyond Gov't

    The Biden administration has taken a major step toward curtailing a growing scourge of cyberattacks with a new executive order that not only imposes heightened cybersecurity requirements on the federal government and its contractors but also sets a strong example that's likely to rub off on private companies.

  • May 14, 2021

    Biden Deletes Trump's Social Media 'Censorship' Order

    The Biden administration walked back a number of Trump-era executive orders on Friday, including a measure aiming to restrict social media companies from censoring online content that critics lambasted as an attack on the First Amendment.

  • May 14, 2021

    Feds Push For Normal China Tariff Collection During Suit

    Government attorneys took a broad swipe at the raft of challenges to punitive tariffs on Chinese goods Friday, telling the U.S. Court of International Trade that collection of the levies should continue normally while the case plays out.

  • May 14, 2021

    Senate To Debate $110B Tech Funding Bill To Outdo China

    The U.S. Senate plans to move Monday toward passing a major $110 billion package to fund research and technology to hone the country's competitive edge against China, after lawmakers tacked on a raft of provisions including those opposing boycotts of Israel.

  • May 14, 2021

    Facebook Can't Block Order To Halt EU-US Data Transfers

    Facebook on Friday was stopped from blocking an early-stage ruling from a European Union privacy regulator that may prevent the company from sending European users' data to the U.S. in a case that could affect any company that serves consumers on both sides of the Atlantic.

  • May 14, 2021

    Verizon Wants Out Of Call Center Workers' Bias, Pension Suit

    Verizon urged a Manhattan federal judge Friday to throw out a swath of collective action and individual claims from two Black former customer service representatives, saying the plaintiffs waited five years to sue after they identified their race discrimination and pension interference claims.

  • May 14, 2021

    Pipeline Ransomware Attack Could Raise Cyber Insurance Bar

    The ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline Co., the latest high-profile example of a growing threat, may make it tougher for companies to negotiate cyber insurance policies without first bolstering their technological defenses, experts said.

  • May 14, 2021

    Japanese Patent Fund Must Serve Huawei In China In 3G Suit

    A judge has overruled an order permitting a Japanese patent fund to serve two China-based Huawei subsidiaries out of jurisdiction, saying on Friday that although refusing alternative service might be gamesmanship it is a game the telecommunications giant is "entitled to play."

  • May 13, 2021

    Apple's Trial Witness Drop Leaves Epic 'Scrambling'

    Epic Games Inc.'s counsel told a California federal judge presiding over a high-stakes antitrust trial Thursday that its legal team was "scrambling," after Apple Inc. dropped a scheduled witness due to what the judge characterized as an "extraordinary circumstance."

  • May 13, 2021

    Pot Businesses Face Texting Bans, Industry Group Says

    The National Cannabis Industry Association says some of its members that use text messaging to market their products and stores are finding themselves shut out of texting platforms, as the industry faces lawsuits over unwanted texts and cell service providers crack down on marketing messages.

  • May 13, 2021

    Turner Sports Anchor Fired For Prioritizing Kids, Suit Says

    Former Turner Sports anchor Casey Stern on Wednesday accused the sports network and parent Warner Media of refusing to accommodate him as he cared for his children, who were suffering domestic abuse, and ultimately firing him for prioritizing his family, according to a discrimination suit filed in Georgia federal court.

  • May 13, 2021

    IP Forecast: Cox Case To Restart Patent Jury Trials In Del.

    Cox Communications is getting ready to defend its high-speed networking technology from a patent-holding company's infringement claims in the first patent trial in Delaware federal court to go before a jury since the pandemic began — plus all the other major intellectual property matters that are on deck for the coming week.

  • May 13, 2021

    Google's Fiber Deal In Iowa Hurts Competition, Telecom Says

    A Mediacom subsidiary is asking the Federal Communications Commission to review a "discriminatory" deal between West Des Moines, Iowa, and Google's internet service provider that temporarily grants Google exclusive rights to a $50 million fiber network pipeline project.

  • May 13, 2021

    Italy Fines Google €100M Over Blocked EV Charging App

    Italy's competition enforcer fined Google €100 million ($120.9 million) on Thursday for allegedly abusing its dominance by blocking a company from launching an app to help drivers find and book slots at electric vehicle charging stations while on the move.

  • May 13, 2021

    Deals Rumor Mill: Full Truck Alliance, A-Rod, Vice Media

    China’s Full Truck Alliance could be worth $20 billion after an IPO, Alex Rodriguez and an entrepreneur might pay $1.5 billion for two Minnesota basketball teams, and a proposed SPAC merger could value Vice Media at about $3 billion. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • May 13, 2021

    Call Center Workers Are Employees, DOL Tells 9th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged the Ninth Circuit to uphold a Nevada federal court ruling that a telemarketing business misclassified call center workers as independent contractors and owed nearly $1.5 million in damages, in a case the government has flagged as "significant."

  • May 13, 2021

    Cumulus Says Worker's Separation Pact Blocks ERISA Suit

    Cumulus Media urged a Georgia federal judge to deal the final blow to a proposed class action accusing it of mismanaging employees' retirement plan, saying the sole remaining named plaintiff had signed an "unambiguous" separation agreement that blocked him from suing.

  • May 13, 2021

    5th Circ. Won't Reboot T-Mobile Ex-Worker's Trans Bias Case

    The Fifth Circuit won't revive a former T-Mobile store worker's suit claiming his transgender status motivated the telecommunications giant to fire him after he took six months off and requested indefinite medical leave, saying the employee hadn't linked his ousting to his gender.

  • May 12, 2021

    Ericsson To Pay Nokia €80M To Nix FCPA Probe-Related Claim

    Ericsson has agreed to pay Nokia €80 million ($97 million) to end a damages claim related to the 2019 resolution of allegations by U.S. agencies that the Stockholm-based telecom giant violated the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, it was announced Wednesday.

  • May 12, 2021

    House Dems Urge Facebook To Ax WhatsApp Privacy Update

    A group of U.S. House Democrats on Tuesday became the latest to put heat on Facebook to scrap plans to require WhatsApp users to consent to policy changes that would expand the sharing of data between the companies, arguing that the move violates Facebook's past privacy promises and would be particularly detrimental to the messaging service's large population of Hispanic users. 

  • May 12, 2021

    Epic Antitrust Judge Doubts Apple Expert's Amex Comparison

    A California federal judge presiding over Epic's high-stakes antitrust trial appeared skeptical Wednesday of a professor's testimony that Apple's anti-steering provisions are akin to restrictions upheld by the high court in Ohio v. American Express, noting that brick-and-mortar stores advertise various payment methods, while the virtual App Store does not.

  • May 12, 2021

    Amazon 'Annihilated' Evidence In Patent Suit, Tech Cos. Say

    Amazon has admitted it systematically "annihilated" all evidence over the first six years of a Texas federal court suit accusing the online retail giant of infringing networking patents, the tech companies suing it claimed Wednesday in a bid for sanctions.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Steps For Law Firms Rethinking Flexible Work Post-COVID

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    A flexible work environment will be key to recruiting and retention efforts post-pandemic, so law firms must develop comprehensive policies that solidify expectations and boundaries on accommodations such as flextime, remote work and reduced hours, says Manar Morales at the Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What UK's New Merger Controls Mean For Private Equity

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    Expansive notification and approval requirements under the U.K.’s new merger control regime — the National Security and Investment Act — along with a lack of clarity about when they go into effect, pose unique challenges for private equity sponsors, as well as their investors and portfolio companies, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Judge's Rebuke Of Mass. AG Has Lessons For All Attorneys

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    A Massachusetts federal judge’s recent rebuke of the state Attorney General’s Office for refusing to respond to discovery requests in Alliance for Automotive Innovation v. Healey highlights six important considerations for attorneys who want to avoid the dreaded benchslap, say Alison Eggers and Dallin Wilson at Seyfarth.  

  • How 5-Year-Old Defend Trade Secrets Act Has Met Its Goals

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    Case law and data reveal that, five years after its enactment, the Defend Trade Secrets Act has opened up federal courts to litigants and has proven effective against extraterritorial misappropriation, while concerns about inconsistency and overuse of ex parte seizures have not borne out, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Font Considerations To Give Your Legal Briefs An Edge

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    Following the D.C. Circuit’s recent notice discouraging use of the font Garamond in legal briefs, Jason Steed at Kilpatrick looks at typeface requirements and preferences in appellate courts across the country, and how practitioners can score a few extra brief-writing points with typography.

  • How Biden's First 100 Days Will Affect Gov't Contractors

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    Joseph Berger and Thomas Mason at Thompson Hine examine the significant opportunities for government contractors arising from actions during the first 100 days of the Biden administration, which set the stage for unprecedented investment in national infrastructure, domestic manufacturing, research and development, clean energy, pandemic response and economic recovery.

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • Functionality's Role In Oracle Copyright Ruling Isn't So Novel

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    In its recent Google v. Oracle decision, the U.S. Supreme Court seemingly revived the copyright fair use factor concerning functionality, highlighting its significant role, particularly in technological contexts, but this accords with a long-standing minority view, says Andrew Michaels at the University of Houston Law Center.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • Biden Infrastructure Plan Will Be Challenging To Implement

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    President Joe Biden's $2 trillion American Jobs Plan proposes incentives for environmental remediation of legacy sites, and creation of more resilient and greener energy infrastructure — but fully implementing it would take many years, and require close coordination between the White House, Congress and federal agencies, says Robert Middleton at Schiff Hardin.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Supreme Court Is Right In Limiting Gov't Agency Authority

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    Although the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decisions in Facebook v. Duguid and AMG Capital Management v. Federal Trade Commission limit government agencies' power against robocallers and scam artists, they ultimately protect Americans from the greater threat of government overreach, says Eric Troutman at Squire Patton.

  • Economic Sanctions And Export Controls: A Q1 Update

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    Attorneys at Kirkland discuss first-quarter developments in U.S. export controls and economic sanctions and what they may indicate about the Biden administration's national security and foreign policy agenda. 

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

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