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Texas

  • September 20, 2018

    Houston Pill Mill Doc, Clinic Chief Each Get 35 Years In Prison

    A Houston doctor and the owner of the pain management clinic where she worked were each sentenced to 35 years in prison by a federal judge in Texas on Thursday for their roles in running what prosecutors called the “most prolific hydrocodone pill mill in Houston.”

  • September 20, 2018

    HTC Says Ericsson Waived Arbitration In SEP Royalties Row

    HTC America Inc. urged a Texas federal court on Thursday to deny Ericsson Inc.'s bid to arbitrate claims that the Swedish telecommunications company overcharged for aging standard-essential patents, saying Ericsson waived its right to force arbitration of the dispute.

  • September 20, 2018

    IHeartMedia Gets OK To Solicit Creditor Votes On Ch. 11 Plan

    A Texas bankruptcy judge issued an order Thursday approving the disclosures and solicitation materials for iHeartMedia Inc.'s Chapter 11 plan, which is expressly opposed by the broadcast media giant's unsecured creditors and has faced challenges from federal authorities.

  • September 20, 2018

    Dallas Hospital Gets Staffing Co. Race Bias Suit Trimmed

    A federal judge in Texas has trimmed a race discrimination lawsuit brought by staffing agency White Glove Staffing Inc. against Methodist Hospitals of Dallas, finding that three of the African-American employees alleging discrimination failed to show they were “similarly situated” to the lead plaintiff.

  • September 20, 2018

    Objector Atty's Offer To Quit Law In Ill. Awaits Ruling

    An Illinois federal judge said Thursday she will decide in October whether to enter judgment against a Texas attorney accused of running an extortion scheme through objections to class action settlements after he offered to stop practicing law in Illinois to end Edelson PC’s suit, a move Edelson opposes.

  • September 20, 2018

    Nursing Home Takes Death Suit To Texas Justices

    A Texas nursing home is taking its fight over a man’s death to the state Supreme Court, saying Thursday that the suit has moved forward only because an appeals court allowed the late patient’s daughter to use an impermissibly flawed expert report.

  • September 19, 2018

    Cuban Pledges $10M After Mavericks Probe Finds Harassment

    Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban will donate $10 million to organizations supporting women in sports and combating domestic violence after an independent investigation corroborated 20 years of allegations of sexual harassment and assault in the Mavericks organization, the NBA announced Wednesday.

  • September 19, 2018

    Some Claims In BP Deepwater Suits Time-Barred, Judge Says

    A Texas federal judge on Tuesday dismissed some claims against BP PLC from more than a dozen of the investor suits in multidistrict litigation related to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill, finding that a 2017 U.S. Supreme Court ruling clarified that certain claims based on company statements from before the spill are time-barred.

  • September 19, 2018

    Glassdoor Fights Order To Hand Over Reviewers' Identities

    Counsel for Glassdoor Inc. told the Texas Supreme Court in oral arguments Wednesday that a state free speech law should defeat a trial court's order that the company hand over the identities of two individuals who posted anonymous negative reviews of an online lingerie retailer.

  • September 19, 2018

    No Need To Reconsider Immunity At PTAB, Fed. Circ. Hears

    Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. and other generic-drug companies challenging Allergan PLC patents for dry-eye medication Restasis urged the full Federal Circuit on Tuesday not to reconsider an earlier decision that tribal sovereign immunity doesn’t apply in reviews at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.

  • September 19, 2018

    Texas Employer Beats Suit From Worker Who Suffered Stroke

    A Texas appeals court on Wednesday tossed a suit accusing a company of failing to provide an employee with medical care after he exhibited stroke symptoms at work, saying the employee did not present evidence that the company owed a legal duty to provide him medical care.

  • September 19, 2018

    Cheniere Tells Texas Judges To Allow Foreclosure In LNG Row

    Cheniere Energy Inc. had the contractual right to initiate foreclosure proceedings against a business partner's subsidiary after it failed to pay back a $46 million loan, and a trial court wrongly enjoined it from doing so, a Texas appellate court was told in oral arguments in Houston on Wednesday.

  • September 19, 2018

    EPA Asks 5th Circ. To Uphold Effluent Rule Delay

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has asked the Fifth Circuit to uphold its decision to postpone parts of an Obama-era rule that set limits on how much toxic metal can be discharged with power plants’ wastewater, an action environmental groups have said is illegal.

  • September 19, 2018

    Oil Field Workers' Attys Get $2.4M Fees, Costs In OT Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Tuesday awarded attorneys representing a group of oil field workers more than $2.38 million in fees and costs after two juries found an energy company failed to pay them overtime, but denied the attorneys’ requests to bill at Washington, D.C., market rates.

  • September 19, 2018

    Contractor Says Insurer Can't Appeal Sports Complex Fight

    Members of a contractor joint venture have urged a Texas federal judge not to allow Mt. Hawley Insurance Co. to appeal a ruling that required it to defend them against a lawsuit over allegedly faulty construction on a San Antonio-area sports complex, saying Mt. Hawley does not have an adequate question that needs review by the Fifth Circuit.

  • September 19, 2018

    Texas Standing-Desk Maker Reaches Deals In Patent Probe

    A desk maker in Texas on Tuesday said it has reached deals with several companies to end a U.S. International Trade Commission probe into its complaint that the companies, which are located in the U.S. and China, infringed patents for its standing desk platforms.

  • September 19, 2018

    NRA Atty's Admission Debacle Shows Need For Ethics Candor

    The recent expulsion of a National Rifle Association lawyer from a Virginia case underscores that attorneys should err on the side of disclosure and treat a request to practice in a different jurisdiction as an open-ended call for any information a judge might want.

  • September 18, 2018

    Chancery Rejects Texas Forum For Quantlab Control Dispute

    A key dispute at the heart of a battle for control of high-speed trading firm Quantlab Financial LLC remained in Delaware’s Chancery Court Tuesday after a vice chancellor rejected a motion to dismiss or stay the action in deference to an earlier-filed lawsuit on the same issue in Texas.

  • September 18, 2018

    Texas Judge Skeptical Of Bid To Skirt Noncompete Arbitration

    A Texas appellate judge on Tuesday said during oral argument the lawyer for a former insurance finance employee had “some explaining to do,” questioning the employee’s argument her bid to void a noncompete agreement doesn’t belong in arbitration.

  • September 18, 2018

    NextEra Wants 3rd Circ. To Revisit $275M EFH Breakup Fee

    NextEra, the once-proposed buyer of the assets of Energy Future Holdings Corp., told a Delaware bankruptcy judge Tuesday that it intends to seek a rehearing before the Third Circuit Court of Appeal on its right to a $275 million breakup fee after a three-judge panel denied its appeal last week.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Law360's Global 20 Doesn't Acknowledge Global Networks

    Glenn Cunningham

    While I read with interest Law360's report analyzing the top 20 global law firms of 2018, I also noticed it doesn't tell the whole story. Global networks of independent law firms compare favorably with multinational firms in terms of geographic coverage, legal expertise, and awareness of local cultures and customs, says Glenn Cunningham of Interlaw Ltd.

  • How Texas' Anti-SLAPP Law Applies To Medical Peer Review

    Jesse Coleman

    Recent decisions both in state and federal courts have made it clear that Texas' anti-SLAPP statute likely now applies to all causes of action arising out of facts related to the medical peer review process. This will greatly increase hurdles for plaintiffs in future legal actions involving medical peer review, say Jesse Coleman and Brian Wadsworth of Seyfarth Shaw LLP.

  • Takeaways From 5th Circ. Wind Farm Scam Case

    Kip Mendrygal

    The misappropriation of funds charge can leave defense attorneys struggling throughout trial to distinguish personal expenses from legitimate business expenses. The Fifth Circuit's decision in U.S. v. Spalding sheds light on how to handle these situations, but also sets out the battles that attorneys won’t win, say Kip Mendrygal and Mario Nguyen of Locke Lord LLP.

  • Guest Feature

    Chris Dodd Talks Dodd-Frank, Nuremberg Trial, Hollywood

    Randy Maniloff

    Attorney Randy Maniloff recently sat down with former Sen. Christopher Dodd at his new office at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. The goal? To discover things we might not know about the author of some of the most important legislation of the last few decades.

  • A Big Verdict Highlights Hazardous Trucking Practices

    John Jose

    The $90 million verdict handed down against Werner Enterprises by a Texas court in May highlights the dangers that can arise when trucking companies pair an experienced driver with a student, then allow the veteran driver to rest while the student behind the wheel faces dangerous driving conditions. Until this practice is changed, we can anticipate more lawsuits like Werner, says John Jose of Slack Davis Sanger LLP.

  • What Kavanaugh's Writing Tells Us About His Personality

    Matthew Hall

    People with certain personality traits tend to use certain words. A computer analysis of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s D.C. Circuit opinions reveals that he is highly extraverted, which means that he would be a prominent voice on the U.S. Supreme Court, says Matthew Hall, a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

  • How Courts Are Analyzing Copyright Protection For Software

    Mark Moore

    Two recent copyright decisions reflect a challenge for companies seeking to protect their software — courts' highly nuanced examinations of the functionality and structure of the software at issue in determining whether copyright protection is warranted, says ​​​​​​​Mark Moore of Reavis Page Jump LLP.

  • Opinion

    3 Pros, 3 Cons Of Litigation Finance

    Ralph Sutton

    An educated guess puts the number of new litigation funders launched in the past 18 months at 30 — an astonishing number, with more to come. Is this a blessing to our legal system or something more akin to tulip mania? Maybe both, says Ralph Sutton, founder and CEO of litigation funding firm Validity Finance LLC.

  • Modern Communication Brings E-Discovery Challenges

    Thomas Bonk

    As new communications platforms displace email, the legal industry is awkwardly grappling with complex e-discovery questions. Fortunately, this environment provides a very fertile ground of incentives for innovation in both e-discovery technology and service offerings, says Thomas Bonk of Epiq.

  • Opinion

    It's Not All About The Benjamins, Baby (Lawyer)

    J.B. Heaton

    Notwithstanding the latest salary war among prominent law firms, I urge my middle-aged and older colleagues to help the recent graduates we know focus on the long term. Even if the salary is the same, there is a big difference between an institutional firm and the relatively younger firms matching BigLaw, says J.B. Heaton, a University of Chicago business law fellow and former partner at Bartlit Beck.